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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    I very rarely even glimpse at that website anymore. It seems heated posts are all that remain on their forums.
    Amen........

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Many cops look down on corrections officers, as seen on O.com. Just read the heated posts that occur when CO's say that they should be extended PC.
    I very rarely even glimpse at that website anymore. It seems heated posts are all that remain on their forums.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Many cops look down on corrections officers, as seen on O.com. Just read the heated posts that occur when CO's say that they should be extended PC.

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by histfan71
    Here in California county jails at least, with the exception of newly-graduated deputies, the deputies assigned to the jail or to transportation were the ones who could not handle it out on the streets.

    The California Department of Corrections (CDC) and the California Youth Authority (CYA) who run the state prisons for adults and juveniles respectively are totally different animals. The Corrections Officers who work there are true corrections professionals who want to work in the prisons, while most sheriff deputies who work in the jail just want to get out on patrol.
    While I agree that many working the jails are there to work their way out onto the streets, I can't agree that those in the department I worked for (in California) in the jail were the ones who "could not handle it out on the streets". Some couldn't, but those were judged individually. The majority of us chose custody as a professional choice. I also worked as an officer in the Colorado prison system in the late 80's. Between the two groups I'd choose the men and women I worked with in the county jail.

    I had many contacts with other agencies officers (I ran the custody gang & classification units) as well as CDC & CYA staff - and from them learned that they too have their balance of good and not so good people.

    I say we have to look at the individual, not the general group, to determine their capabilities, their "fit" in the work, and their professionalism.

    And this applies as well to the officers in our security department here too.

    Just my opinion.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    I've never understood how many cops look down on custody officers (whether or not they are sworn). They sure liked getting any tips we could pass along to help them solve their cases (I was able to help one department solve an open gang murder based on information I came across in the jail).
    Here in California county jails at least, with the exception of newly-graduated deputies, the deputies assigned to the jail or to transportation were the ones who could not handle it out on the streets.

    The California Department of Corrections (CDC) and the California Youth Authority (CYA) who run the state prisons for adults and juveniles respectively are totally different animals. The Corrections Officers who work there are true corrections professionals who want to work in the prisons, while most sheriff deputies who work in the jail just want to get out on patrol.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    I worked custody(jail) by choice - and didn't want to work the streets. I found custody to be just the challenge I wanted.

    I've never understood how many cops look down on custody officers (whether or not they are sworn). They sure liked getting any tips we could pass along to help them solve their cases (I was able to help one department solve an open gang murder based on information I came across in the jail).

    Besides, if (IMO) you want to learn about people and how they think, behave, etc....try custody work for a year. It'll beat any college degree in social behavioral science.
    That is so very true. Sheriff Dan Tehan(?), Hamilton County Ohio, stated in closed session of the Sheriffs Association in 1971, much valuable information came from those prisoners relating to crimes that were either unsolved or never reported to law enforcement.
    I keep saying over and over again, the same thing applies to street people. If they are handled properly and kindly, they represent a treasure trove of valuable information. In your capacity, you can act on it or pass it to that agency that has jurisdiction.
    My partner and I helped DEA and a military investigative agency break up a cocaine smuggling ring based on just such a source.
    For health reasons, we were both reassigned. Loose lips...
    aka Bull, thank you for fiving us that insight.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • aka Bull
    replied
    I worked custody(jail) by choice - and didn't want to work the streets. I found custody to be just the challenge I wanted.

    I've never understood how many cops look down on custody officers (whether or not they are sworn). They sure liked getting any tips we could pass along to help them solve their cases (I was able to help one department solve an open gang murder based on information I came across in the jail).

    Besides, if (IMO) you want to learn about people and how they think, behave, etc....try custody work for a year. It'll beat any college degree in social behavioral science.
    Last edited by aka Bull; 05-23-2006, 11:55 AM.

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  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Unless your in this county then its almost all contract corrections....Corrections Corporation of America (aka Corrupt Corrections of America) runs all the jails in this county. (Except for the State's Work Camp)

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Because of states like mine, where the position of "jailer" is non-sworn, less wage, and not considered a law enforcement position. The "House of Corrections" runs the jail, not the Sheriff's Department. In my county, they use non-sworn corrections officers who go through a 2 week jailer academy, and are employees of the Sheriff's Department.

    Road deputies assigned to the jail division transport prisoners (That way, they can chase/arrest/kill escapees) from the court to the jail. Otherwise, its all un-sworn Corrections Officers.

    Now, in Florida, most counties have sworn correctional deputies. The only problem is that the Sheriff invests lots of money in you as a correctional deputy, so if you want to transfer to road... Its going to be awhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    Don’t get me started on the jail thing. Why is jail duty considered a lesser or demeaning aspect of LE???
    It shouldn't be.
    County Sheriff Deputies are trained in the same academy, work patrol, state courts and maintain county jails. The caution is always the same, lose concentration for a moment and you might not go home at night.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    I had one partner "sentenced" to jail duty...
    Don’t get me started on the jail thing. Why is jail duty considered a lesser or demeaning aspect of LE???

    Leave a comment:


  • darrell
    replied
    I have taken discounts but not freebies..

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  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Free coffee? They probably have ''bigger fish to fry." Discounted meals might be a different matter. Did you ever check with your superiors?
    I had one partner "sentenced" to jail duty for a year because his Sergeant disciplined him for accepting a piece of pie with coffee on the house. Dumb and petty - yes. It all depended on how your supervisor felt that day really (in general) and about you (specifically). Our department policy (as many too have) is NO GRATUITIES!

    I was a supervisor before I left the department. I never worried about what the others said or did with what they got, it never happened to me once I got promoted - my crew just wouldn't do it in front of me. Most supervisors had a "just please don't let me hear/see it attitude).

    When you got two kids to raise you don't take chances that could make them awful hungry while you're between jobs.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    I love how these posts remind me of things & get me going off on past experiences .

    One of the 3 hotels I work for was the first Holiday Inn in Canada. It was near the international airport. It was a 2 story hotel like most of the original Holiday Inns, more of a motor court than an hotel. In the mid 80's the hotel had turned part of the 2nd floor into a detention centre which was rented to the governement to detain people who arrived illegally by plane until they could be deported. There were bars on the windows & a cage in the parking lot where the prisoners would be taken out of the van & brought into the hotel. After a few years this centre was closed down. I'm told it was because Holiday Inn did not like the fact that one of their hotels was being used as a jail!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Another side of this discussion is about those that abuse the freebees. One of my hotels located by the airport has always given the police free meals. The Montreal Police usually come for breakfast & the Surete du Quebec which patrol the highway stop by for desert & coffee at the end of their evening shifts. About 5 years ago the Montreal Police changed to Community Policing with smaller districts. The one station that patrolled the area of the hotel was broken into two, one on the north side of the borough & one on the south side where the hotel is located. The guys from the new district north of the hotel which no longer patrolled our area continued to come for free food. Cops from other nearby districts that used to work in the old large one would even join them. Some mornings there would be 10 police cars parked in the front of the hotel. Enough was enough, we had to contact the stations & make it clear that only people from the station that covered our hotel were allowed free food!
    The Hilton I was stationed at had this problem. Not only were they there for free food, they would stay there, and make it a "base of operations." No patrol requirement in that sector, since the sector was Ybor City and 4 blocks long.

    We would have guys come in from as far as 3 sectors away. I got bored one time and started asking guys their squads. We had about five squads of people. One squad is a unit assigned to a geographical area.

    The general manager relied on them for general security services whenever he was around to make our nights even brighter. Never mind the fact that the hotel owners had contract security. Those don't do anything, you know.

    The management company started ordering the free food and drink be placed on a City of Tampa Police account to track how much profit is being lost. At Hilton's inflated rates for food and drink (It was not a full service hotel, so it was little microwave food, etc), it was several thousand a month. That they billed the city for!

    Even better was that they'd all park in front of the hotel. 10 deep. A Hilton Inspection Team arrived. They grabbed me since I was the only one standing (everyone else was sitting) and I had rank on. We wore nearly identical uniforms, save for the patches and badges. The conversation was great:

    Her: "Hi. I work for Hilton Corporate. Is there a problem here?"
    Me: "No, no problem."
    Her: "Why are there so many of you here?"
    Me: "I'm sorry?"
    Her: "Police. Is there a problem, that there are so many of you here?"
    Me: "I'm the contract security. Those are police officers."
    Her: "Oh. They contract for police as well as security?"
    Me: "No, those are on-duty police officers. They work in Ybor City."
    Her: "I see. Does your manager know they're here?"
    Me: "Yes. He invites them. They handle any problems that come up."
    Her: "They don't call you for hotel issues?"
    Me: "No, they ask the police."
    Her: "Ok. Can you call the manager to me on your radio, or is it a police radio?"

    General Manager was told to remove the 10 police cars in 5 minutes, as well as remove all these police officers lounging in the lobby. Hilton's policy, according to her, was to NOT use armed police officers for security services, as they are both armed and their sworn duty to enforce law may conflict with Hilton enforcement policy. (Put a guest in their room before arresting them.)

    Now, the best part was, most of the cops figured out that something was Very Wrong(tm) when a Hilton person was talking to me, and I kept saying "police." They split. Quick. Left their cars in the lot.

    Our GM, never going the middle road, told me to find those policemen, and tell them that he's having their cars towed. And that they're not allowed to park here anymore.

    You can see the fun here. He's the good guy. Sit on the couch, drink our sodas, eat our sandwiches. I'm the bad guy. Get off my lawn, I'm going to tow your squad cars, Hilton says you're not allowed here anymore.

    Our call for service time dropped to 30 minutes for any call for a good six months after that.

    Leave a comment:

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