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do you accept discounts ??

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Another side of this discussion is about those that abuse the freebees. One of my hotels located by the airport has always given the police free meals. The Montreal Police usually come for breakfast & the Surete du Quebec which patrol the highway stop by for desert & coffee at the end of their evening shifts. About 5 years ago the Montreal Police changed to Community Policing with smaller districts. The one station that patrolled the area of the hotel was broken into two, one on the north side of the borough & one on the south side where the hotel is located. The guys from the new district north of the hotel which no longer patrolled our area continued to come for free food. Cops from other nearby districts that used to work in the old large one would even join them. Some mornings there would be 10 police cars parked in the front of the hotel. Enough was enough, we had to contact the stations & make it clear that only people from the station that covered our hotel were allowed free food!

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    In the 90's I worked as a corrections deputy in California. At a local establishment I frequented they knew where I worked and always made the coffee free and the meals discounted.
    A similar thing happened to me. A truckstop/casino opened up a few years back. Thing is, this town is home to 2 State prisons and numerous chemical plants with various private security firms employed.
    The first week the truckstop was open I stopped for dinner on the way home in my corrections uniform. First time in, I got a discount. Next time, no discount. Third time, discount. Fourth trip to the truckstop, no discount. I finially asked my waitress, WTF? The lady told me that the discount was meant for cops only and that there had been some confussion the first week between who the police were and who the corrections officers and security were. So, serving and giving discounts to about 100 people a day in uniforms who were not cops and it took them a week to figure things out? Stoopyd!!
    Yeah, if I go in for pancakes and am offered a discount I take it.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    A thought. Could there be a case made of bribery if the s/o accepting the freebie is a proprietary employee of a city owned business (our hospital is city owned), even though that s/o has no powers of arrest other than those of a private citizen?

    In the 90's I worked as a corrections deputy in California. At a local establishment I frequented they knew where I worked and always made the coffee free and the meals discounted. I tried refusing but always got the discount - so I took to leaving the full price laying on the table when I left. I just felt it was better not to jepordize my job over a bucks worth of coffee or a few dollar meal.
    Free coffee? They probably have ''bigger fish to fry." Discounted meals might be a different matter. Did you ever check with your superiors?

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by CAR54
    There's a nearby coffee shop that gives free coffee to the local police. I was in there one morning wearing my uniform and bomber jacket when the korean gal working there told me I didn't have to pay for my coffee. Evidently she thought I was a cop. I was TEMPTED to just accept the free coffee and quietly leave, but it occurred to me what happens the next time I walk in and there's a couple of real LEO's there, and the gal again offers me free coffee. I don't think the officers would find it too amusing and I doubt I'd fool them into thinking I was law enforcement.

    Of course maybe she just offered me the free coffee because she knows how poorly security guards are paid and took pity on me.
    You made the right decision. I had a similar experience and I refused the discount because I knew the clerk was confusing me with the police. They understand the difference now.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    There are a few convenience stores here that give us free coffee and that's just because they know us as frequent customers. They have the understanding we're not there to hang out for more than five minutes or so and are not providing security for their store. Having friends out there is a good thing.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Discounted coffee and donuts? YES, I'll accept them. As long as the store understands that I am a security officer and not the police.

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  • aka Bull
    replied
    A thought. Could there be a case made of bribery if the s/o accepting the freebie is a proprietary employee of a city owned business (our hospital is city owned), even though that s/o has no powers of arrest other than those of a private citizen?

    In the 90's I worked as a corrections deputy in California. At a local establishment I frequented they knew where I worked and always made the coffee free and the meals discounted. I tried refusing but always got the discount - so I took to leaving the full price laying on the table when I left. I just felt it was better not to jepordize my job over a bucks worth of coffee or a few dollar meal.

    Leave a comment:


  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    I like it when the store tries to hide that they give freebies to cops! The local Dunkin Donuts near me used to take the $10.00 bill from the cop & give him back 2 $5.00s!

    thats what the donut shop girls do with my 3yr old daughter because we have told her not to take things from shops without paying for them meaning dont steal and she now insists on paying for everything the only thing is she always expects change.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You have no more powers than a private citizen. You have no powers, no authority, no standing as an agent of the state. You are a private citizen, period.
    Actually that part is true as well here. A security guard has standing as an agent of the state since he is regulated by the state police, but also only has the status of a private citizen as far as the same limited arrest power and no immunity to liability. There are a few specific statutes that also apply to security, but our standing is still that of a private citizen.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    I like it when the store tries to hide that they give freebies to cops! The local Dunkin Donuts near me used to take the $10.00 bill from the cop & give him back 2 $5.00s!

    Leave a comment:


  • CAR54
    replied
    There's a nearby coffee shop that gives free coffee to the local police. I was in there one morning wearing my uniform and bomber jacket when the korean gal working there told me I didn't have to pay for my coffee. Evidently she thought I was a cop. I was TEMPTED to just accept the free coffee and quietly leave, but it occurred to me what happens the next time I walk in and there's a couple of real LEO's there, and the gal again offers me free coffee. I don't think the officers would find it too amusing and I doubt I'd fool them into thinking I was law enforcement.

    Of course maybe she just offered me the free coffee because she knows how poorly security guards are paid and took pity on me.

    Leave a comment:


  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    its more the shops i rarely get calls from that give the discounts.for example the bottle shop that requests security all the time for stupid reasons doesnt even give their employees a staff discount but the locksmiths cutts our keys for free,kfc if they have jobs going and we see one of the little crims fill in a job application and we dont know their address or name they give it to us and dont bother with that person.its just little things like that.but kfc gives a staff discount,the lollie shop does,kmart takes 50 percent off.kmart has their own security.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    See, that's strange to me, because Florida hammers into your skull from hour one, class one:

    You have no more powers than a private citizen. You have no powers, no authority, no standing as an agent of the state. You are a private citizen, period.

    You can't bribe a private citizen.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Does Texas have laws making "unjust compensation" a criminal offense? I've never heard of a state doing that for anyone but public officials and public employees. Florida's official position has always been, "You can't bribe a security guard, they have no authority to sway through compensation."
    It has to do with the state's definition of "public servant". According to that, a variety of people could be considered a public servant, depending on how they are representing the government or are exercising a governmental function even if legally unqualified.
    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statu...00.htm#1.07.00
    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statu...0.htm#36.07.00

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    One should also check with the state's statutes to find out what the definition of "bribery", "official corruption", "honorarium", etc is. That doesn't always apply to police officers or government officials. It may apply to others as well.
    Does Texas have laws making "unjust compensation" a criminal offense? I've never heard of a state doing that for anyone but public officials and public employees. Florida's official position has always been, "You can't bribe a security guard, they have no authority to sway through compensation."

    Leave a comment:

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