Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

do you accept discounts ??

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • do you accept discounts ??

    as you all know i work in a mall.some of the shops give mall employees a pretty generous discount.would you accept the discounts?.my fiancee picks me up every afternoon and the donut shop always has some donuts waiting for them they give them about $20 dollars worth of donuts.technically its not giving it to me but is that still classed as gifts and grattitudes.

  • #2
    Do I accept discounts?

    My word I do, at every given opportunity.

    The discounts are usually related to Union Card holders or being contracted to or employed by a retail organisation that offers staff discounts.

    Comment


    • #3
      This is going to be a long thread, I just know it.

      No, I don't personally accept discounts or free items because I've never been put in a situation to accept such things - no one's ever offered.

      Comment


      • #4
        Discount vs. Gratuity

        An employee discount is not a gratuity. If the discount is offered by your own company, it is a benefit. If it is offered by an outside business, you can bet they have some sort of financial arrangement with your company. Somewhere along the accounting trail, the business makes up for the discount.

        A gratuity is a service or merchandise offered with the expectation of special consideration. For example, a convenience store offers a free coke or cup of coffee in exchange for uniform presence/deterrence. Let’s say burglary alarms are simultaneously activated for two different stores, on the same block. Which one are you more likely to check first? The store that expects you to pay for everything or the store that feeds you for free?

        Is accepting a gratuity wrong? Technically, yes. However, most will see it as shades of gray.
        I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
        -Lieutenant Commander Data
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          First rule about "gratuities:" Unless you have some power vested in you by the Government, you cannot be bribed! Now that we have that out of the way, onto the "reality" of bribing a security guard.

          Accepting gratuities that your company is aware of, as is the client, is acceptable so long as they are enjoyed by all. Why? Companies frequently give discounts and other "perks" to their own employees and contractors as a method of loyalty to the company.

          I have worked sites where access to the kitchen was authorized for all employees working the night shift. What did that mean? Free food for 8 hours. Free soda, free food, just make sure the area is clean as you left it so you don't make a burden for the kitchen staff in the morning.

          Is this a gratuity? Yes. Is this an improper one? No. It is part of the "benefits package" and therefore acceptable.

          Now, when you are given things by people who are not paying your company for services, you need to consider why its happening. If your company has the patrol supervisor stop off at the local 7-11 every night to refuel the patrol vehicle, and you are spending 30-60 minutes in the 7-11 eating their food and drinking their drinks for free - you may actually be creating a contractual agreement between your company and 7-11 Stores for protection services!

          Yeah, its a long shot, but its enough to make your company dislike you. A lot. Because they've been sued for failing to be there, like clock work, like they always have been, to stop that robbery.

          Another issue is taking gratuties from those you will have to impartially take action against later on. Lets take the instance of a residential complex. You are the patrol officer who works it for 12 hour shifts. You know the residents.

          One of them offers you free food from a BBQ. Are you tempted to say yes? Are you tempted to say no? There's danger in both yes and no here. If you say no the wrong way, you may offend them. These might be the only folks who will call the police when you're being shot at. If you say yes, someone else may call foul for "bribing security."

          Know that unless you have official authority as an agent of the government (Campus Safety Officers take heed: You are an agent of the government if its a public school!) you cannot be arrested on federal/state/local charges of misprison of office or bribery. Even if you lapse in the performance of your duties and it is shown you show favoritism to the person who gave you gratuities. Why?

          You are not a public employee or public official. You are a private citizen who has a contractual obligation only. You can't be bribed!

          Now, what can happen to you is you can be fired.

          Simply check with your company policy as to "bribery." And if it says that you can't take bribes... Then don't, since its next to impossible to.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Employee discounts at other hotels, free rooms for back-to-back shifts & free meals are part of the benefits of working in an hotel. (The free meals are a taxable benefit).

            Now as for cash tips. I was always taught that it was not proper for Security to accept tips. This was back in the good old days when Security did ONLY Security work. In the 80s when major cutbacks were done in hotels they cut things like overnight Bellboy & Housekeeping services. We now have to deliver towels to rooms in the middle of the night & help a guest who is checking out before the Bellboys arrive at 07h00 with their luggage. For THESE duties my staff have been told they can accept a tip. For anything purely Security, no.
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
              ...Simply check with your company policy as to "bribery." And if it says that you can't take bribes... Then don't, since its next to impossible to.
              One should also check with the state's statutes to find out what the definition of "bribery", "official corruption", "honorarium", etc is. That doesn't always apply to police officers or government officials. It may apply to others as well.
              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

              Comment


              • #8
                some of the local fast food places give a 10-15% discount. I don't think i would take free though, thats a dark enough shade of gray to stay away from. a discount to take the edge off of the tax is nice though.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 1stWatch
                  One should also check with the state's statutes to find out what the definition of "bribery", "official corruption", "honorarium", etc is. That doesn't always apply to police officers or government officials. It may apply to others as well.
                  Does Texas have laws making "unjust compensation" a criminal offense? I've never heard of a state doing that for anyone but public officials and public employees. Florida's official position has always been, "You can't bribe a security guard, they have no authority to sway through compensation."
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                    Does Texas have laws making "unjust compensation" a criminal offense? I've never heard of a state doing that for anyone but public officials and public employees. Florida's official position has always been, "You can't bribe a security guard, they have no authority to sway through compensation."
                    It has to do with the state's definition of "public servant". According to that, a variety of people could be considered a public servant, depending on how they are representing the government or are exercising a governmental function even if legally unqualified.
                    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statu...00.htm#1.07.00
                    http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statu...0.htm#36.07.00
                    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      See, that's strange to me, because Florida hammers into your skull from hour one, class one:

                      You have no more powers than a private citizen. You have no powers, no authority, no standing as an agent of the state. You are a private citizen, period.

                      You can't bribe a private citizen.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        its more the shops i rarely get calls from that give the discounts.for example the bottle shop that requests security all the time for stupid reasons doesnt even give their employees a staff discount but the locksmiths cutts our keys for free,kfc if they have jobs going and we see one of the little crims fill in a job application and we dont know their address or name they give it to us and dont bother with that person.its just little things like that.but kfc gives a staff discount,the lollie shop does,kmart takes 50 percent off.kmart has their own security.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There's a nearby coffee shop that gives free coffee to the local police. I was in there one morning wearing my uniform and bomber jacket when the korean gal working there told me I didn't have to pay for my coffee. Evidently she thought I was a cop. I was TEMPTED to just accept the free coffee and quietly leave, but it occurred to me what happens the next time I walk in and there's a couple of real LEO's there, and the gal again offers me free coffee. I don't think the officers would find it too amusing and I doubt I'd fool them into thinking I was law enforcement.

                          Of course maybe she just offered me the free coffee because she knows how poorly security guards are paid and took pity on me.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I like it when the store tries to hide that they give freebies to cops! The local Dunkin Donuts near me used to take the $10.00 bill from the cop & give him back 2 $5.00s!
                            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                              You have no more powers than a private citizen. You have no powers, no authority, no standing as an agent of the state. You are a private citizen, period.
                              Actually that part is true as well here. A security guard has standing as an agent of the state since he is regulated by the state police, but also only has the status of a private citizen as far as the same limited arrest power and no immunity to liability. There are a few specific statutes that also apply to security, but our standing is still that of a private citizen.
                              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X