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One For The Good Guys

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  • One For The Good Guys

    Police: Robbery Suspect Killed In Shootout With Guard
    I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
    -Lieutenant Commander Data
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  • #2
    I wonder if they're going to catch hell for having a "plainclothes guard" in the store, since "a plainclothes guard isn't a visible deterrant, and therefore, this was obviously a guard waiting to kill a would-be robber."

    I like how the police haven't released their names, and aren't charging them with a crime (yet).

    This is how my use of deadly force would be handled in Florida was explained to me:

    1. You shoot someone.
    2. You call your boss immediately.
    3. You call 911.
    4. The media will hear the call go out on the radio, and haul to the location.
    5. You will have your weapon, duty gear, and belt removed from you.
    6. You will be handcuffed, and "arrested."
    7. You will be taken to the police station, away from the media, and questioned.
    8. You may or may not be charged with unlawful homicide.

    The gist of the being "arrested," stripped of your weapon, gear, and belt is so that the media see you're being treated like a criminal, and not a police officer. Because the media will usually try for the "vigilante justice security guard" story.

    The best case I ever heard of was a man who scored Distinguished Master, 100% accuracy with his .38 revolver, was roasted in the paper. The media alledged since he was an expert shot,he should of trick-shot and disarmed the suspects, instead of center mass. We were told, by our employer, to ensure that we were not higher than 90% on our requals.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
      I wonder if they're going to catch hell for having a "plainclothes guard" in the store, since "a plainclothes guard isn't a visible deterrant, and therefore, this was obviously a guard waiting to kill a would-be robber."

      I like how the police haven't released their names, and aren't charging them with a crime (yet).

      This is how my use of deadly force would be handled in Florida was explained to me:

      1. You shoot someone.
      2. You call your boss immediately.
      3. You call 911.
      4. The media will hear the call go out on the radio, and haul to the location.
      5. You will have your weapon, duty gear, and belt removed from you.
      6. You will be handcuffed, and "arrested."
      7. You will be taken to the police station, away from the media, and questioned.
      8. You may or may not be charged with unlawful homicide.

      The gist of the being "arrested," stripped of your weapon, gear, and belt is so that the media see you're being treated like a criminal, and not a police officer. Because the media will usually try for the "vigilante justice security guard" story.

      The best case I ever heard of was a man who scored Distinguished Master, 100% accuracy with his .38 revolver, was roasted in the paper. The media alledged since he was an expert shot,he should of trick-shot and disarmed the suspects, instead of center mass. We were told, by our employer, to ensure that we were not higher than 90% on our requals.
      Mr. Corbier, according to stories like this you've posted it appears to me this is how Florida treats their security in general. The media in my state has said some pretty defamatory things, but when it's deemed the force used was justice served, there have been some pretty positive portrayals in the media. It's not quite that bleak everywhere. The media making unrealistic statements like "he should have trick-shot the suspect" should really be met with legal action. Statements like that are designed to defame, not to provide any constructive input. This seems indicative of a severe case of social prejudice toward us there.
      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

      Comment


      • #4
        Indeed, they should be sued. But, by a poor guy who's being investigated for capital murder, originally making 7-8 dollars an hour, its not going to happen.

        I will note, however, that Tampa Bay Online had an editorial about how "security guards are getting what they deserve," in that they're being recongized as a law enforcement entity and hitting one will now be a felony.

        Florida Senator Crist (R) noted that "there is private sector law enforcement." I'm waiting for someone to remind the good Florida Senator, publically, that security guards are security guards, and not law enforcement officers.

        That's just the way politics work.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

        Comment

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