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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    I am probably going against the grain on this one. Officer Molly Bowden?s murder was a classic example of poor to nonexistent supervision. Why? At guard mount or supervisory briefings and inspection of officers and their equipment would have discovered the problem of unwarranted slack or movement. The supervisor tells an officer to stand fast for equipment check, the officer braces himself or herself. Equipment check includes the checking of break-away tie, if part of a duty uniform and the movement of the belt up and down and moving it from one side to the other to check for excess movement or slack. Correction of the problem may include the repositioning of belt and rig keepers or the addition of one or more keepers. Training and supervision do matter.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Arff312
    replied
    Ok i recently started with a second security company. For this company i am allowed to carry all the weapons i am certified in. So i had to change my belt set up. All gear is Bianchi accumold Nylon. All is personally owned including my radio. I dont like using company stuff. Ok here it goes.

    Double cuff case ( 2 sets of peerless cuffs)
    Badge holder (when in polo uniform)
    Silent key holder
    Stinger case (poly stinger inside)
    Leatherman blast
    D-Cell holder
    Swivel radio case (MT 2000 Radio)
    ASP side break holder (26 In. ASP Silver Baton)
    MK III Holder (Take down 10% OC)
    Nextel Case
    Pager/Glove case (2 pairs of gloves)

    I will post pictures if wanted. I also have a Basket Weave belt that follows the same set up.
    Last edited by Arff312; 12-22-2005, 11:13 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    Belt keepers are essential to officer safety



    Officer's sacrifice serves as reminder to law enforcement about the importance of belt keepers

    By Shelly Wilkison
    Newsline Editor
    [email protected]

    "Officer Molly," as she was called by the young people she inspired, never met a stranger. She was friendly and outgoing, and well-liked by her fellow officers.

    So when Molly Bowden, 26, passed away February 10th -- one month after being shot three times during a traffic stop -- her police family in Columbia, Missouri, was devastated. The community that was brought together during her month-long struggle to survive, grieved along with them. She was the first officer to be killed by gunfire in this city of about 100,000.

    Officer Bowden, who left behind her husband, also a Columbia police officer, two stepsons, her parents and a brother, also left law enforcement with lessons to be learned from her sacrifice.

    "It has been difficult for all of us and we're still going through the steps of the healing process," Columbia Police Chief Randall Boehm told Newsline recently.

    Chief Boehm said patrol car video of the shooting indicated Officer Bowden, who had been on the department less than three years after serving one year as a university police officer, had only 3.8 seconds to react after the suspect fired his first shot (that missed the officer) through the driver side window.

    As she moved to the rear of the vehicle to take cover, Richard Thiel Evans exited his vehicle and fired at Officer Bowden again. This time the bullet penetrated her neck and spine and she fell to the ground. Chief Boehm said the video shows the suspect moving around the car, and when he reached the officer, he fired two more shots from less than two feet away. One hit her in the lower jaw and the other struck her shoulder. The suspect then returned to his vehicle and fled the scene. Passersby saw the officer on the ground and used her radio to call for help.

    Columbia police found the killer the next day, and after a brief gunfight during which another officer was injured, the suspect killed himself.

    Upon examination of the officer's duty belt, her pistol was found still inside the triple-retention holster with only the back snap unfastened. A fellow officer reported in an email sent to Newsline that there was no belt keeper between the baton and her gun, and the baton was "moved forward so that it came between the belt and rear snap" of the holster.

    Chief Boehm said the department, which provides officers with a velcro duty belt, doesn't require belt keepers. He said some officers still wear them and others do not, but he believes that "the issue was time, and in that 3.8 seconds, she didn't have time to get her weapon drawn."

    With the development of duty belts that attach with velcro, Calibre Press warns officers not to forego belt keepers.

    "Belt keepers are designed to do two things -- they keep the inner belt and the outer belt connected and keep weapons appropriately spaced, which helps prevent them from getting in the way of one another," said Calibre Press consulting survival instructor LouAnn Hamblin, a 14-year police veteran from Van Buren Township, Michigan. "Impeding the movement required for deployment of any control device can cause serious problems for officers. Other weapons and non-essential items like cell phones, leatherman tools, etc. shouldn't impede the movement required to draw weapon systems like the pistol or Taser."

    As more agencies are requiring officers to carry collapsable batons and Tasers, accommodating them on an already crowded belt has become a challenge for many, especially smaller women and men. In order to find a place for everything, some may choose to eliminate belt keepers that can be one-half inch to three-quarters of an inch wide.

    But, survival instructors say with all of the control devices officers are required to carry, belt keepers have proven to be an essential part of the duty belt and proper use of them can keep officers safe. They say eliminating belt keepers to make room for additional weapons is the wrong choice.

    Officer Hamblin, who is 5 foot 5 inches tall and weighs 124 pounds, is the same size that she was when she first joined the force 14 years ago when the only items on her belt were a revolver, radio, mace, handcuffs and a flashlight. Since then, the department has required officers to carry a baton and a Taser, but Officer Hamblin has no room for the Taser.

    "I don't have the ability to carry one," she said. "I would have to give up my baton or OC spray to make room for it, so I'm not required to carry it."

    She said for her own safety, eliminating belt keepers to make room for a Taser wasn't an option. Holsters not separated from each other may make it more difficult to access a weapon. And when it comes to accessing a pistol, anything that restricts an officer's quick draw could prove deadly.

    Calibre Press Street Survival instructor Betsy Brantner-Smith, a 25-year veteran from Naperville, IL, said that until one year ago, she carried her collapsable baton right behind her pistol. Then, Officer Robert Hindi, inventor of the Hindi Baton Cap, suggested carrying the baton in front on the non-gun side so it wouldn't interfere with the pistol. The baton's holster can be canted at different angles for comfort and accessibility.

    "I have mine canted at a 45 degree angle in a cross-draw position," she said. "It is easy to access and doesn't interfere with movement or my ability to access my other equipment."

    Smith said after making the change, she spent lots of time training with the newly arranged duty belt to be certain that she could react quickly with her weapons in their new positions. Developing a new skill requires many repetitions, she said.

    The Calibre Street Survival Seminar advocates dynamic and realistic training with whatever equipment officers carry on their duty belts.

    "Above all, they need to be accessible and comfortable," Smith said. "Train with the stuff you're carrying, and train from the equipment's holstered position on the belt -- whether it's your baton, your spray, your handcuffs or your pistol."

    "If you train with your equipment, you know what all the possibilities are," Hamblin said.

    SECURITY HOLSTERS NEED MORE SPACE ON A BELT

    Throughout history, hundreds of peace officers have been killed because they lost control of their weapons during physical struggles with the bad guys. As a result, many law enforcement agencies today provide officers with security holsters that make it more difficult for a gun to be removed by anyone other than the officer.

    The Level III security holsters have two or three straps, depending on the make and model, that snap closed to secure a weapon in the holster.

    "Officers using this type of holster should be especially aware of other items on the duty belt that might restrict access to these snaps," said Hamblin. "Gunfights are won and lost in quarter-seconds, so every obstacle to employing lethal force can be costly to the officer."

    Because a Level III holster has a back snap, it is recommended that two belt keepers be used to separate the gun from a baton holster, Smith said. Without that separation, a baton holster is likely to stand in the way of the snap and/or the movement required to remove the gun from its holster once the strap has been unsnapped.





    Belt keepers are essential to officer safety. Not only do they secure the duty belt to the inner belt, they also provide space between weapon systems allowing officers to quickly access the tools they need to keep themselves safe. Survival instructors recommend placing two belt keepers behind the pistol, and suggest moving the baton holster to the front.

    (Photos provided by LouAnn Hamblin)





    SHIFTING GEAR

    Officer Hamblin reminds officers wearing velcro duty belts that belt keepers provide an added sense of security.

    "Every time an officer gets out of a car, or even stands up from a seated position, a belt can shift," she said. "If we get into a situation where we have to use a weapon, it's critical that it be in the right location. Otherwise, we lose valuable seconds that in the worst cases, might mean the difference between life and death."

    She said there have been many cases where duty belts shifted as officers struggled with suspects. Several years ago, a Chattanooga, Tennessee, police officer was killed with her own weapon following a struggle. When she was found, the gun holster side of her duty belt had shifted to the small of her back.

    "The whole issue is awareness," said Hamblin. "An officer has to be aware of his or her equipment, themselves and their environment. The duty belt is critial to our safety, and regardless of what model we choose or what weapons we store there, training with it will help prepare us for the worst."

    Smith and Hamblin say they were deeply saddened by news of Officer Bowden's death, and they consider her a hero.

    "Molly was an excellent officer, and she was the kind of person who never met a stranger. People liked her very much and she was perfect for the job," Chief Boehm told Newsline.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I've heard of this (the reshifting of the entire rig) before, on more than one occassion. With the inclusion of belt keepers, the bad guy has to rip through all of those uniform pant belt loops. When your wearing those big ass keystone belt loops, that's a feat in itself.

    That nerve is great if you can hit it, but damn, everyone should wear little safety orange dots to tell us where to strike in a dynamic encounter. Some of the forums I'm on are defensive tactics instruction orientated - and I find that people eschew the tools and go to submission grappling when they're trained sufficiently to actually hold their own and overcome the person's resistance.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    1. How's the safariland velcro duty belt setup hold up? I've heard it chafes the uniform pants belt loops, but I figure that's a small price to pay for the system.

    The velcro does tend to "chew" the belt loops, but to what extent really depends on the pants you wear. I wear the Elbeco Tactical Twill (65% Poly/35% Cotton), and they have held up nicely since I bought them in February.

    2. Are the duratec's still heavy enough to "power through" a defensive strike, especially if you miss the nerve cluster target?

    A positive with the duratec is the fact that it is much lighter than other models, and therefore helps with fatigue. As far as it's effectiveness, the jury is still out. A few months ago I utilized my baton on a violent and combative subject, of whom was 6'8" 325 lbs (far more than my 6'5" 210 lbs). He was quite intoxicated and assaulted an individual. While I was chasing him on foot, I gave him 3 good strikes in his right thigh (going for that infamous nerve), with absolutely no effect. I ended up having to get up next to him, and kick him in the shin to get him to go down. He went down of course, and so did I. As we are both struggling on the ground I continued to strike him in his forearms. I ended up having to deploy my chemical spray to gain any kind of control. Basically, my baton failed me in that incident. Luckily though, in the years i've been in private security and law enforcement, I have rarely ever had to utilize my baton.

    3. Does that Gladius strobe pattern blind as effectively as everyone thinks it does? I looked at the video, and was impressed with it.

    This was a recent purchase, and I haven't really been able to deploy it in that manner yet. Through my own testing of the gladius I would definately say that the strobe pattern shows promise in being able to disorient and blind a subject. It really depends on the situation though. I have drawn my firearm on numerous occassions where my weapon-mounted M3 streamlight proved to be a great tool to blind and disorient an armed subject. I am itching for the day when I can field test my gladius on a DK Disorderly subject.

    I believe, also, in using belt keepers as spacers. When I wore my ASP behind my pistol, it'd always jam right up against the butt of my pistol, preventing me from drawing both. Same with cuffs. Belt keeper between the two keeps everything nice and stable - where its supposed to be.

    The ASP behind the pistol can be the difference between life and death depending on the holster you utilize. If you have a holster like most Safariland Raptors where you have to rock the firearm back to draw, then that ASP can slow down or even prevent you from drawing your firearm when needed. My reasoning is stability and spacing. I don't know if anyone read about the sheriffs deputy in Virginia I beleive who got into a struggle with a combative male. During the struggle, her entire belt shifted to the point where her firearm was located in the small of her back. I don't care how good you are, but you are not going to draw a level III retention holster from the small of your back in a violent encounter. She was killed by her own weapon after the male disarmed her. When you utilize a velcro belt with at least 4 belt keepers, this WILL NOT happen to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002
    I wear a Safariland Leather Duty Belt (velcro lined) with a Safariland velcro pants belt.

    Starting from the front-center and going clockwise...

    ***open-top single cuff case w/peerless chained restraints (just to the right of the front-center)
    ***open-top chemical spray case w/ 4oz Freeze+P
    ***1" belt keeper (provides seperation between chemical spray and firearm)
    ***Safariland 6004 SLS Tactical Holster w/Glock 22 .40cal with weapon mounted M3 streamlight
    ***1" belt keeper (provides seperation between firearm and baton)
    ***ASP Sidebreak Scabbard w/ 26" ASP Duratec Airweight Baton
    ***Leatherman tool
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***roughly 6" open space
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***handcuff strap w/peerless hinged restraints
    ***removable swivel radio holder
    ***open-top flashlight case w/ Blackhawk Gladius LED flashlight
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***Safariland double magazine case in horizontal draw position
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***latex glove case

    I'll add some photos when I figure out how to upload them

    Smme of you might be wondering why I utilize a velcro-attached duty belt with 6 - 1" belt keepers. The answer is simple... Officer Safety. This ensures that in the event of a struggle, nothing on my belt shifts in anyway. Also, it maintains the proper seperation between my firearm, baton, chemical spray, etc.
    Three questions:

    1. How's the safariland velcro duty belt setup hold up? I've heard it chafes the uniform pants belt loops, but I figure that's a small price to pay for the system.

    2. Are the duratec's still heavy enough to "power through" a defensive strike, especially if you miss the nerve cluster target?

    3. Does that Gladius strobe pattern blind as effectively as everyone thinks it does? I looked at the video, and was impressed with it.

    I believe, also, in using belt keepers as spacers. When I wore my ASP behind my pistol, it'd always jam right up against the butt of my pistol, preventing me from drawing both. Same with cuffs. Belt keeper between the two keeps everything nice and stable - where its supposed to be.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    I wear a Safariland Leather Duty Belt (velcro lined) with a Safariland velcro pants belt.

    Starting from the front-center and going clockwise...

    ***open-top single cuff case w/peerless chained restraints (just to the right of the front-center)
    ***open-top chemical spray case w/ 4oz Freeze+P
    ***1" belt keeper (provides seperation between chemical spray and firearm)
    ***Safariland 6004 SLS Tactical Holster w/Glock 22 .40cal with weapon mounted M3 streamlight
    ***1" belt keeper (provides seperation between firearm and baton)
    ***ASP Sidebreak Scabbard w/ 26" ASP Duratec Airweight Baton
    ***Leatherman tool
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***roughly 6" open space
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***handcuff strap w/peerless hinged restraints
    ***removable swivel radio holder
    ***open-top flashlight case w/ Blackhawk Gladius LED flashlight
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***Safariland double magazine case in horizontal draw position
    ***1" belt keeper
    ***latex glove case

    I'll add some photos when I figure out how to upload them

    Smme of you might be wondering why I utilize a velcro-attached duty belt with 6 - 1" belt keepers. The answer is simple... Officer Safety. This ensures that in the event of a struggle, nothing on my belt shifts in anyway. Also, it maintains the proper seperation between my firearm, baton, chemical spray, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
    If sidearms are issued or purchased by the individual, are holsters designed for that particular sidearm equipped with ?grab resistant? devices? If so, what retention level ? 1, 2 or 3? If not so equipped, why not? Liability issues considered?
    Those should be questions we should ask ourselves, the employer and most importantly, general counsel. We might be surprised at the responses we receive.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    I used to have a box of Level 2 Safariland for S&W weapons, because BY GOD, someone would go out and buy a 600 dollar S&W Revolver, and then buy a 20 dollar Uncle Mikes HUNTING holster for 15.99 with zero retention, and show up for work with it. It became a daily ritual to inspect the probationary officer's equipment upon first showing up to my site for FTO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Duty Gear Setup

    If sidearms are issued or purchased by the individual, are holsters designed for that particular sidearm equipped with ?grab resistant? devices? If so, what retention level ? 1, 2 or 3? If not so equipped, why not? Liability issues considered?
    Those should be questions we should ask ourselves, the employer and most importantly, general counsel. We might be surprised at the responses we receive.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Arff312
    Thanks for the info. I am still not sure which model the 2 agencies taht carry them have. I am still wondering if i want to go through the training if i cant carry it where i work now. As a employeer would you want to see more certs even if they arent used by you ?
    Only if the comapnies carrying them aren't going to poison the market by misusing them. You'll still get that about pepper spray, batons, and everything else. All it takes is a few local or regional news stories about "Security Guard arrested for Taser Misuse" or something to make everyone start fearing your officers with a taser on their belt.

    Another interesting thing I just noticed... Ever notice the AP will, when a security officer does something right, call them a "security officer," or "security professional," but when they screw up or look like they did, they call them a "security guard?" Semantics play a big part in our media today. Ask a FOP guy about that, when the local paper is attacking the police, he'll tell you ALL about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arff312
    replied
    Thanks for the info. I am still not sure which model the 2 agencies taht carry them have. I am still wondering if i want to go through the training if i cant carry it where i work now. As a employeer would you want to see more certs even if they arent used by you ?

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Ok, because this interests me, I wrote Taser's investor relations ([email protected]), and asked them for clarification on their "law enforcement only" X26, and if any private security companies have been issued them, contrary to what a taser sales representative told our committee last year (They did a 180.)

    Normally, I'd just call a sales rep and go, "Yo, can we have x26s?" But Wiscosnin makes that a little hard.
    Arrived in my inbox, from Taser International -
    Originally posted by Taser International Email
    Hello,

    There was a program in the past that allowed private security agencies
    to purchase Law Enforcement models. Such program does not exist any
    longer and only sworn Law Enforcement can purchase the Law Enforcement
    models. Private Security can purchase the M18, M18L and X26C. In regards
    to your instructor question you will need to contact our training
    Department at 1-800-978-2737 and ask for Training. Thank you and have a
    great rest of the week !!

    Jose Rojas
    So, if Tasers are legal in your state for civilian carry, all you can buy of the new models in use is the X26c. The M series is somewhat effective, I've been told by LEOs and civilian users, however, it is not the light weight X series, and looks like your drawing a Glock 17.

    I do not recommend the X26c for duty use, because of the long charge time, and the double trigger pull escape mode. This is a liability nightmere waiting to happen, as you may be held to the police standard for taser use.
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 10-05-2005, 01:35 AM.

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  • mallpopo
    replied
    cuffs, I.D. badge, o.c., cell phone, second pair of cuffs, pager, nextel, mall radio, gloves, key ring, and one last pair of cuffs (hinged), everything in black (more tactical that way)!!!!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
    At the job I was speaking of in that post, it was a shopping center. I was primarily there for property protection. We would sometimes assist LPOs with apprehensions if the suspect was fighting, difficult, etc. but we were mainly visual deterrants and "trained observers."
    Were you trained with handcuffs, and in apprehension, btw? Most stores have fits if a third party assists their employees, unless the store management has verification of your credentials.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
    When I wore a duty belt, I only carried 1 set of handcuffs, Stinger XT, latex glove case and a cell phone case. There wasn't a need for anything more.
    What duty were you performing, and what training have you recieved in regards to empty hand defense, etc? Were you responsible for the protection of life, or the protection of property, only?

    All these factors determine "need" in what duty gear is carried. I have never worked for a company that protects property only, and the concept somewhat interests me.

    Leave a comment:

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