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Security Officer Saves Infant's Life

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    The Good Sam laws do not prevent legal actions. The laws offers some protection if one is sued but it doesn't prevent the law suit.
    .....
    Exactly right. Even if you have training, it's important to ask the victim for permission to help them. Otherwise, don't touch. Involve them in their own care if possible. For example, if the are bleeding, have them hold pressure on the wound themselves. If the victim is unresponsive and alone, then each one will have to decide whether to take the risk. If the individual is hurt because of his or her own wanton recklessness, I might not assist. Otherwise, it's a no brainer. I'm going to help and worry about the legal issues later.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    A question for you N.A. Corbier. Is it the norm for security companies not to train employees in first aid just to avoid liability? I work in-house security and we are not trained in first aid.
    My belief is this:

    If the company spends time, money, and energy to train its people in basic first aid, there's no recouperation AND they open themselves up to liability. If an employee is certified in first aid and the company didn't do it, then its not the company's fault (yah right) if the guy makes a personal decision to do so.

    Several companies I worked for in the Tampa Bay area made me sign a form stating that I am not a professional rescuer and that as a condition of employment I will not exercize my personal choice to provide first aid to someone on post during duty.

    I asked about it, and they said it says exactly what it means, "I'm not a professional rescuer, and my only job is observe and report. Observe the incident and report it to 911."

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by mh892
    I spent a couple hours reading about the Good Samaritan laws/stautes. All 50 states and D.C. have Good Samaritan laws. They very somewhat in wording and some have special applications but they all follow the same spirit of the concept. Good Samaritan laws are for everyone, lay and professional. The Good Samaritan laws are to prevent tort and other claims against people in which the Good Samaritan laws apply.

    GCSO; Government Contract Security Officer.
    The Good Sam laws do not prevent legal actions. The laws offers some protection if one is sued but it doesn't prevent the law suit.

    I just reviewed Indiana's Good Sam statutes. You correct in saying it does include professional rescuers but I wouldn't hang my hat on that. It seems Indiana's position has shifted for the better.

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  • T202
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Exactly, Tennsix. And the moment that your employer is advertising you will perform any emergency medical service, you just became a professional rescuer.

    When you decide, you're a layperson. When your company decides for you, and pays you for this as part of your duties, then you just became part of the EMS system, subject to federal and state regulations.

    A question for you N.A. Corbier. Is it the norm for security companies not to train employees in first aid just to avoid liability? I work in-house security and we are not trained in first aid.
    Last edited by T202; 05-11-2006, 06:50 PM.

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  • mh892
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

    What is a GCSO?

    I spent a couple hours reading about the Good Samaritan laws/stautes. All 50 states and D.C. have Good Samaritan laws. They very somewhat in wording and some have special applications but they all follow the same spirit of the concept. Good Samaritan laws are for everyone, lay and professional. The Good Samaritan laws are to prevent tort and other claims against people in which the Good Samaritan laws apply.

    GCSO; Government Contract Security Officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Ok, I seem to be chiming in late, but here are two thoughts of mine:

    1) The ad is newsworthy. It definitely isn't front page material, but it does merit what it got, a concise newspaper ad that merited what this person did and showed the local community there the value of the service he was providing. This needs to happen in more places, to edify the public that we are not all just a bunch of booger picking goobers who sit around and do basically nothing and are the bottom feeders of the economy.

    2) Regarding the Good Samaritan Act and the duty to render aid: I was first aid certified a few years ago. It has since expired, but I'm certain one facet remains the same. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong since I'm no expert on this. When you are certified to render first aid, you are protected from vicarious liability for rendering that aid if you have the victim's permission to render the aid. If the victim is unconscious, the permission is implicit. If the victim is a child, permission must be obtained from a parent. If the parent is not present, permission is implicit.

    The requirement to render aid falls under two areas: duty and choice. If you are performing your duties at your workplace and first aid certification was given as part of your job training, then you have a duty to render aid as part of your job description. You may face liability if you do not in this case. This goes for any job description you have as a certified first aid responder, whether it's as security, management, or even facility maintenance.
    Aside from that duty, you have the choice to render aid. This is if you are not performing your duties at work. Keep in mind that if you do make the choice to perform first aid, your choice is committed. You may not reverse your decision after it is made and neither may your supervisor or boss.

    Regardless of whether first aid is a duty or choice, however, most places I've seen have statutes requiring security officers to perform some sort of first responder action. This normally equates to contacting 911 and having paramedics respond. I have seen this done often, even for incidents where there didn't seem to be injuries, such as for someone who tripped and fell on the floor. This was to avoid liability from the state government for failure to notify emergency responders or failure to act as first responders. The duty to notify remained.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

    What is a GCSO?
    Exactly, Tennsix. And the moment that your employer is advertising you will perform any emergency medical service, you just became a professional rescuer.

    When you decide, you're a layperson. When your company decides for you, and pays you for this as part of your duties, then you just became part of the EMS system, subject to federal and state regulations.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tennsix
    replied
    The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

    What is a GCSO?
    Last edited by Tennsix; 05-11-2006, 02:27 AM.

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  • mh892
    replied
    I will need to dig thru some notes and do some state by state research, but, it seems to me I remember a professor once telling us that there is a "Good Samaritan" law/rule that covers a person attempting to rescue/render aid to one in distress/danger. As I remember, the "Good Samaritan" law/rule covers the rescuer as long as he/she acts in a mannor expected of a reasonable person and not beyond training/ability.

    As I understand it over zealous heros are not covered in this law/rule.

    As a GCSO with Resuscitative Medicine Training Certificate I am "expected" (required?) to render aid.

    It is confusing. I don't see how in the world an employer could/would refuse to back an employee who attempts to render aid to a fellow human being who is in need of rescue/aid and that employee is the first or only person on scene. In my heart and mind a fellow human's life/well being rates at the top of matters of concern.
    Last edited by mh892; 05-11-2006, 01:59 AM.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    It's Canada wide. Part of the criminal code. I can't find the article right now but it was drilled into me when I took my Emergency Medical Technician's course. We had instructors that were Paramedics. Paramedics were not recongized in Quebec. (They had gone to the states to take the courses). When they came upon an incident where for example & IV was needed they went ahead & did it saying that this article protected them.

    As for providing First Aid while on duty I look at the definitions. A FIRST AIDER is someone trained in First Aid who happens to be nearby when first aid is needed. A FIRST RESPONDER is someone who is required to respond to a first aid situation. A Security Guard paid a premimum to provide first aid would be a First Responder.
    Last edited by HotelSecurity; 05-10-2006, 09:35 PM.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Ah, but here's a good question.

    If you are trained in first aid/CPR/AED on your own time, or before you sought employment as a security agent... Can your employer order you not to perform first aid, only summon assistance?

    In other words, is this a requirement of all citizens of your provience, or just security agents?

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Heh. Here, its a personal decision because you are not a professional rescuer. The only duty to aid you have is to summon EMS. That duty to aid is removed if you believe in good faith that someone else has done so.

    Say it with me, Neil. Liability. If you are a professional rescuer, the higher on the food chain you are in the medical profession, the less duty you have to perform!

    If a doctor is at an accident scene, they don't have to lift a finger, just call 911. Why? Because if they touch someone, they're practicing, and subject to malpractice claims.
    Again: If you have been trained to provide aid & someone needs it, you are required to provide it. In Canada a doctor could be criminally charged if he did not help at the scene of an accident. As for liability. Again another Canadian & US difference. Lawsuits in Canada a much rarer than in the US & the rewards are very much lower.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Canadian law REQUIRES you to provide first aid if someone is in need of it & you have been trained to give it.

    Neil
    Heh. Here, its a personal decision because you are not a professional rescuer. The only duty to aid you have is to summon EMS. That duty to aid is removed if you believe in good faith that someone else has done so.

    Say it with me, Neil. Liability. If you are a professional rescuer, the higher on the food chain you are in the medical profession, the less duty you have to perform!

    If a doctor is at an accident scene, they don't have to lift a finger, just call 911. Why? Because if they touch someone, they're practicing, and subject to malpractice claims.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Actually, in most cases, it is not part of the job of an American Security Guard to perform any rescue work, or even attend to first aid. Most major companies make it a provision of employment that you are not a professional rescuer, and if you attempt to make a professional rescue, you agree that you will be terminated with cause for violation of company policy.
    Canadian law REQUIRES you to provide first aid if someone is in need of it & you have been trained to give it.

    Neil

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    If the guard jumped into freezing water to save the child or ducked under gun-fire I'd be in the parade. Obviously he did a good thing. To the child & family it is very important. But is it newsworthy? I've preformed CPR a few times on hotel guests. Am I a hero? No. It's part of my job.
    Actually, in most cases, it is not part of the job of an American Security Guard to perform any rescue work, or even attend to first aid. Most major companies make it a provision of employment that you are not a professional rescuer, and if you attempt to make a professional rescue, you agree that you will be terminated with cause for violation of company policy.

    If the client wants professional rescuers or first aid givers, they can hire guards certified in first aid or EMT-B for .25 or 5.00 per hour additional.

    My state requires that if I advertise for ANY professional first-aid or rescue services, that all my "professional rescuers" be certified as Wisconsin EMS First Responders. It is a felony to advertise for professional first-aid or first responder services without being licensed to do so. This is an EMS rule, not a security or police rule. This includes CPR, First-Aid, BLS, and AED operation.

    If an individual employee feels a "personal decision" to perform first-aid or CPR, it is his choice as a citizen, but I can't advertise that we perform those services.

    You folks know that I'm not joking, too.
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 05-10-2006, 03:25 AM.

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