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Security Officer Saves Infant's Life

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  • #16
    The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

    What is a GCSO?
    Last edited by Tennsix; 05-11-2006, 03:27 AM.
    I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
    -Lieutenant Commander Data
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    • #17
      Originally posted by Tennsix
      The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

      What is a GCSO?
      Exactly, Tennsix. And the moment that your employer is advertising you will perform any emergency medical service, you just became a professional rescuer.

      When you decide, you're a layperson. When your company decides for you, and pays you for this as part of your duties, then you just became part of the EMS system, subject to federal and state regulations.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #18
        Ok, I seem to be chiming in late, but here are two thoughts of mine:

        1) The ad is newsworthy. It definitely isn't front page material, but it does merit what it got, a concise newspaper ad that merited what this person did and showed the local community there the value of the service he was providing. This needs to happen in more places, to edify the public that we are not all just a bunch of booger picking goobers who sit around and do basically nothing and are the bottom feeders of the economy.

        2) Regarding the Good Samaritan Act and the duty to render aid: I was first aid certified a few years ago. It has since expired, but I'm certain one facet remains the same. Somebody correct me if I'm wrong since I'm no expert on this. When you are certified to render first aid, you are protected from vicarious liability for rendering that aid if you have the victim's permission to render the aid. If the victim is unconscious, the permission is implicit. If the victim is a child, permission must be obtained from a parent. If the parent is not present, permission is implicit.

        The requirement to render aid falls under two areas: duty and choice. If you are performing your duties at your workplace and first aid certification was given as part of your job training, then you have a duty to render aid as part of your job description. You may face liability if you do not in this case. This goes for any job description you have as a certified first aid responder, whether it's as security, management, or even facility maintenance.
        Aside from that duty, you have the choice to render aid. This is if you are not performing your duties at work. Keep in mind that if you do make the choice to perform first aid, your choice is committed. You may not reverse your decision after it is made and neither may your supervisor or boss.

        Regardless of whether first aid is a duty or choice, however, most places I've seen have statutes requiring security officers to perform some sort of first responder action. This normally equates to contacting 911 and having paramedics respond. I have seen this done often, even for incidents where there didn't seem to be injuries, such as for someone who tripped and fell on the floor. This was to avoid liability from the state government for failure to notify emergency responders or failure to act as first responders. The duty to notify remained.
        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Tennsix
          The Good Samaritan Act only covers lay people, not professional rescuers. Even then it only serves to reduce liability, if you are sued. Many think it a protection against law suits.

          What is a GCSO?

          I spent a couple hours reading about the Good Samaritan laws/stautes. All 50 states and D.C. have Good Samaritan laws. They very somewhat in wording and some have special applications but they all follow the same spirit of the concept. Good Samaritan laws are for everyone, lay and professional. The Good Samaritan laws are to prevent tort and other claims against people in which the Good Samaritan laws apply.

          GCSO; Government Contract Security Officer.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
            Exactly, Tennsix. And the moment that your employer is advertising you will perform any emergency medical service, you just became a professional rescuer.

            When you decide, you're a layperson. When your company decides for you, and pays you for this as part of your duties, then you just became part of the EMS system, subject to federal and state regulations.

            A question for you N.A. Corbier. Is it the norm for security companies not to train employees in first aid just to avoid liability? I work in-house security and we are not trained in first aid.
            Last edited by T202; 05-11-2006, 07:50 PM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by mh892
              I spent a couple hours reading about the Good Samaritan laws/stautes. All 50 states and D.C. have Good Samaritan laws. They very somewhat in wording and some have special applications but they all follow the same spirit of the concept. Good Samaritan laws are for everyone, lay and professional. The Good Samaritan laws are to prevent tort and other claims against people in which the Good Samaritan laws apply.

              GCSO; Government Contract Security Officer.
              The Good Sam laws do not prevent legal actions. The laws offers some protection if one is sued but it doesn't prevent the law suit.

              I just reviewed Indiana's Good Sam statutes. You correct in saying it does include professional rescuers but I wouldn't hang my hat on that. It seems Indiana's position has shifted for the better.
              I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
              -Lieutenant Commander Data
              sigpic

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              • #22
                Originally posted by T202
                A question for you N.A. Corbier. Is it the norm for security companies not to train employees in first aid just to avoid liability? I work in-house security and we are not trained in first aid.
                My belief is this:

                If the company spends time, money, and energy to train its people in basic first aid, there's no recouperation AND they open themselves up to liability. If an employee is certified in first aid and the company didn't do it, then its not the company's fault (yah right) if the guy makes a personal decision to do so.

                Several companies I worked for in the Tampa Bay area made me sign a form stating that I am not a professional rescuer and that as a condition of employment I will not exercize my personal choice to provide first aid to someone on post during duty.

                I asked about it, and they said it says exactly what it means, "I'm not a professional rescuer, and my only job is observe and report. Observe the incident and report it to 911."
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Tennsix
                  The Good Sam laws do not prevent legal actions. The laws offers some protection if one is sued but it doesn't prevent the law suit.
                  .....
                  Exactly right. Even if you have training, it's important to ask the victim for permission to help them. Otherwise, don't touch. Involve them in their own care if possible. For example, if the are bleeding, have them hold pressure on the wound themselves. If the victim is unresponsive and alone, then each one will have to decide whether to take the risk. If the individual is hurt because of his or her own wanton recklessness, I might not assist. Otherwise, it's a no brainer. I'm going to help and worry about the legal issues later.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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