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  • Daily Activity Report (DAR) / Pass-On logs

    At my post, we have a binder thats filled with everything, among other things is the "Pass-On" log.

    Being the detailed person that I am, I choose to use this as more of a DAR then a Pass on. I log things such as times I do money escorts and with who, apprehsions I have made, negative interactions I have had with guests, etc. Of course, I also note my time on/off duty. The space is limited so I keep it brief.

    However, the other guy that works the post with me only puts "on duty....off duty." Thats all I see when I relieve him of duty.

    I wish he would log more. One reason why I do this is because I want to show the client I am doing something and not standing around. Another is to cover me. Instead of writing things down, he tells me about things like I am going to remember it all. I also think he fills it he is on duty and off duty in advance so he doesnt have to deal with it.

    Does anyone else have this issue with DAR's / Pass on logs?
    "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

  • #2
    Oh, yeah!

    Fortunately, I'm in a position to affect some change: we just did our Performance Eval's... and you can dam% betcha that "Use the pass on log to greater effect" was on each and every one...
    "I'll defend with my life your right to disagree with me" - anonymous

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    • #3
      Originally posted by FireEMSPolice View Post
      At my post, we have a binder thats filled with everything, among other things is the "Pass-On" log.

      Being the detailed person that I am, I choose to use this as more of a DAR then a Pass on. I log things such as times I do money escorts and with who, apprehsions I have made, negative interactions I have had with guests, etc. Of course, I also note my time on/off duty. The space is limited so I keep it brief.

      However, the other guy that works the post with me only puts "on duty....off duty." Thats all I see when I relieve him of duty.

      I wish he would log more. One reason why I do this is because I want to show the client I am doing something and not standing around. Another is to cover me. Instead of writing things down, he tells me about things like I am going to remember it all. I also think he fills it he is on duty and off duty in advance so he doesnt have to deal with it.

      Does anyone else have this issue with DAR's / Pass on logs?
      Yep, and that guy probably makes the same amount of money you do, huh?

      Now you know what it's like to be a government employee.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by FireEMSPolice View Post
        At my post, we have a binder thats filled with everything, among other things is the "Pass-On" log.

        Being the detailed person that I am, I choose to use this as more of a DAR then a Pass on. I log things such as times I do money escorts and with who, apprehsions I have made, negative interactions I have had with guests, etc. Of course, I also note my time on/off duty. The space is limited so I keep it brief.

        However, the other guy that works the post with me only puts "on duty....off duty." Thats all I see when I relieve him of duty.

        I wish he would log more. One reason why I do this is because I want to show the client I am doing something and not standing around. Another is to cover me. Instead of writing things down, he tells me about things like I am going to remember it all. I also think he fills it he is on duty and off duty in advance so he doesnt have to deal with it.

        Does anyone else have this issue with DAR's / Pass on logs?
        That's pure speculation on your part, by the sounds of it, so it's a non-issue. If you have evidence, that's one thing, but it doesn't sound like you do.

        But onto your question, it all depends on what the intent of that particular piece of paperwork is. If it's just a pass-on, the client should never see it because it wouldn't be part of the contracted paperwork that your company provides on a daily basis. If that is the case, it isn't a shift report, so you don't have to add everything. If it doesn't concern the next shift/your replacement, it doesn't belong in there. The real question, then, is why his shifts are so slow. If it's like that consistently, they may want to look into his activity at work, and see exactly what he does (if anything).

        Now, if it [i]actually is[/]i a shift report, he should be writing more. Similar to what you were doing, an outline of your activity. This is to show the client that, even if there were no incident reports that day, you were still doing something.

        So I can't really say if he's in the right or the wrong here. It all depends on what your company implemented that paperwork to do, specifically.

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        • #5
          Whenever another officer tells me something I write it down. One of the pieces of equipment I always have is a notepad of some sort. I also keep a few pens handy. This way I don't have to worry about remembering what the officer I relieve told me. I also work with two kinds of officers: those that see absolutely nothing in 12 hours, and those that write down everything they see over their 12. I fall somewhere in between and my DOR's reflect this.

          What I cannot stand is the officer who would ignore stuff just so he didn't have to do a lengthy report or would wait until the end of his shift to fill it out. Pertinent data was always left out. Since I am relieved by the supervisor and it is partly my job as his second to brief him, I get really irritated when I don't have facts in front of me...

          I understand the frustration. What I would suggest is keeping a numbered, bound notebook and recording the information on your own if you feel that it is important to keep up with. When it is full, date it and lock it away. That way you can pull it out if needed. I wouldn't worry too much about the other guy.

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          • #6
            You could be in my situation and simply have officers who have more time yet seem to get less done anyway.

            As a dayshift officer my day starts with one of two things, either I sit at a light-rail platform for 2hrs or I have to ride a commuter train for 3hrs. Both of which give me 5-6hrs to complete my duties.

            I will effectively make it to all 10 transit stations in that time and do the required patrol. When I relieve the graveyard guy, who didn't have to deal with daytime traffic, and had no prescribed duties such as train riding/watching, and see that he has only gone to 5-6 of the posts, it irks my chain a bit.

            As far as the passdowns go, my passdowns are usually very light. Most days I dont really even have anything to pass-on. I'll say "hey, I went everywhere, nothing is really going on." And that will be it unless I actually have something to report that was either an incident on my shift or may possibly effect his shift, such as if someone has told me something is going to happen like a work crew showing up at an hour not on my shift.
            "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
            "The Curve" 1998

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 5423 View Post
              Oh, yeah!

              Fortunately, I'm in a position to affect some change: we just did our Performance Eval's... and you can dam% betcha that "Use the pass on log to greater effect" was on each and every one...


              I just fired a officer for this. We have no guard accountability system (detex) at one post. To make a long story short I spied on the officer for 2 hours and all he did was sit on his ass. Came on property checked the DAR found it all the way filled out with rounds that he didn't do. Told him turn in his gear in the morning. We consider it falsifying offical documents.

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              • #8
                Obviously, I don't know the story, but it sounds like you've got an "Attaboy" comin'.

                That, in a nutshell, is the key responsibility of a supervisor: Accountability. Check, and recheck; it's the super's job to know what's really going on, and the only way to know is to go look into everything.
                "I'll defend with my life your right to disagree with me" - anonymous

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by doulos Christou View Post
                  Whenever another officer tells me something I write it down. One of the pieces of equipment I always have is a notepad of some sort. I also keep a few pens handy. This way I don't have to worry about remembering what the officer I relieve told me. I also work with two kinds of officers: those that see absolutely nothing in 12 hours, and those that write down everything they see over their 12. I fall somewhere in between and my DOR's reflect this.

                  What I cannot stand is the officer who would ignore stuff just so he didn't have to do a lengthy report or would wait until the end of his shift to fill it out. Pertinent data was always left out. Since I am relieved by the supervisor and it is partly my job as his second to brief him, I get really irritated when I don't have facts in front of me...

                  I understand the frustration. What I would suggest is keeping a numbered, bound notebook and recording the information on your own if you feel that it is important to keep up with. When it is full, date it and lock it away. That way you can pull it out if needed. I wouldn't worry too much about the other guy.
                  Amen!

                  "The dullest pencil has a longer memory than the sharpest mind."
                  "Lawyers, Guns and Money"

                  "Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Our problem is that since security has been cut down to 12 hours a day, we are not getting info on secuirtyissues that occured during the other 12 hours & were handeled by other hotel staff.
                    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                    • #11
                      With the pass-on log, I would consider only inputting the most important data that an oncoming officer should know, i.e. things that will affect the oncoming officer. The apprehensions (with names and times) and the negative interactions with persons on property are good, since you may get yelled at by proxy.

                      Anything else should be written in an official DAR, which, I'm gathering, your company doesn't provide. This should be a suggestion to pass on to your supervisor, that a DAR be designed and maintained at each client property by all security personnel. This will justify your work, as you obviously desire be done, and will keep that permanent log in both the client's file cabinet and your personal notebook (as dC suggested).
                      Most of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to get their work done.
                      -- Peter Drucker

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                      • #12
                        I'm missing something here.

                        A Daily Activity Report or Chronological Log is a near-real time account of the events that were observed by the security watch, and serves as reporting to the security company and client.

                        A "pass-down log" is some dead horse that some companies trot out because they aren't allowed to keep the DAR or Chronological Log Book on site so the next shift can read it, which tells the next guard that he should know about X or Y.

                        Its little more than a post it note.

                        Why are chronological log entries going into post it notes?
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                        • #13
                          I am with Corbier on this one. A DAR and a pass along should be two separate things. Sometimes things that are listed on the DAR end up in a pass along as well if they impact the next shift(s). A pass along is no place for chronological entries of all your shift activities.

                          At my company, we have an area for pass-alongs on the computer. Although, in reality, a scratch pad on the operator console sees more action as a pass along tool than the computer does.

                          We have no official roll call, but as members of the arriving shift come on duty, they are briefed by the previous shift of any happenings that might impact them.

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                          • #14
                            A pass on log is not a daily activity log / patrol log. It is used to relay messages and any important information from one shift to the next. Everything you do with times should be recorded in your activity log or patrol sheet. The next shift should be looking at those anyway.
                            If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

                            "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

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                            • #15
                              I know the difference, but the way my supervisors are, I want to show I am being productive before he or the client say otherwise.
                              "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

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