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Cops and Reckless Driving

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    ...... Don't sell your self short.
    Thanks, I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    Well, I like to think of myself as conscientious. I don't lock up everyone that bends the law a little or write a ticket on every traffic stop. I think the human equation is a very important element of the profession. Don't sell your self short.
    Well said Tennsix. As I learned in the Sheriff Academy in the early 1970s, as with pilots, "There are old pilots and there are old pilots; there are no old bold pilots." Conversely, there are no old bold LEOs. The chief instructor was a vet from Korea, Air Force F-86 pilot, now a Highway Colonel with the County Sheriff.
    Back after major surgery.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I empathize with the frustration that the police feel when formal complaints are filed against them, even when justified. The challenge with police work is that most citizens don't bother to commend the police when they do things right. However, if they step out of line just once, the people that they have sworn to protect are lining up to lodge a complaint.

    The other side of the coin is that when you do commend a police officer, they look at you suspiciously as if you have some sort of agenda or selfish intent to get on their good side. I have found that many police officers have difficulties with human relationships. Depression, divorce, and suicide plague the police as a result of "stuffing" their emotions and feelings in an effort to always be in control.

    Dealing with the bad and ugly side of humanity on a daily basis can get to anyone. I don't have the solution. But anyone who is especially empathetic and conscientious will likely have trouble in this line of work. Another reason why it's not for me.
    Well, I like to think of myself as conscientious. I don't lock up everyone that bends the law a little or write a ticket on every traffic stop. I think the human equation is a very important element of the profession. Don't sell your self short.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by The_Mayor
    I used to think a lot like you on this in terms of the speed issue. And I still do to an extent. I understand why the highway patrol goes 90 in the 65s low, they are closing the distance between them and speeders. So I can see why they speed without lights and siren in that case........
    Agreed. It's one thing to exceed the posted limit on a limited access highway and another to do it on the back roads where unsuspecting motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians are at risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    A no-win situation

    I empathize with the frustration that the police feel when formal complaints are filed against them, even when justified. The challenge with police work is that most citizens don't bother to commend the police when they do things right. However, if they step out of line just once, the people that they have sworn to protect are lining up to lodge a complaint.

    The other side of the coin is that when you do commend a police officer, they look at you suspiciously as if you have some sort of agenda or selfish intent to get on their good side. I have found that many police officers have difficulties with human relationships. Depression, divorce, and suicide plague the police as a result of "stuffing" their emotions and feelings in an effort to always be in control.

    Dealing with the bad and ugly side of humanity on a daily basis can get to anyone. I don't have the solution. But anyone who is especially empathetic and conscientious will likely have trouble in this line of work. Another reason why it's not for me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tennsix
    replied
    That sounds like Roscoe and Enis.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Lord of the Keys
    replied
    I've seen some close calls with PD units that had nothing to do with responding to calls. Once after doing DOT inspections at our gate two police cars were leaving. As they normally do they took off fast and turned out a one way lane the wrong way as they headed to our exit. This time a truck was coming down our main road. The first unit almost side-swiped the truck but slammed on his breaks just in time. The second unit came within inches of rear ending the first one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thanks Tennsix

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  • Tennsix
    replied
    Originally posted by The_Mayor
    I used to think a lot like you on this in terms of the speed issue. And I still do to an extent. I understand why the highway patrol goes 90 in the 65s low, they are closing the distance between them and speeders. So I can see why they speed without lights and siren in that case. What I don't like though is how they don't use their turn signals, they hardly ever do. Thats just stupid.
    Man, I hate to say this.... Mayor, I agree with you.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I used to think a lot like you on this in terms of the speed issue. And I still do to an extent. I understand why the highway patrol goes 90 in the 65s low, they are closing the distance between them and speeders. So I can see why they speed without lights and siren in that case. What I don't like though is how they don't use their turn signals, they hardly ever do. Thats just stupid.

    Leave a comment:


  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    about 5 yrs ago now i was walking home with my younger brother who had one foot bandaged and was pushing a bike.because he had a sore foot he went around the pathway and i ran down the side of the hill.along came a police car and pulled up my brother as it was dark and the police didnt see me in the shadow,this officer decided to come right up in my brothers face and accuse him of riding a bike without a helmet my brother replied that he was not riding the bike because he has a sore foot and didnt want to risk hurting further at that point i saw the officer edging his foot closer to my brothers.i walked out of the shadow and asked the officer what the problem was he replied he was just having a friendly chat with this young man and to mind my own buissiness.he then got in his car and left.when we got home we told mum what had happened so she went down to the police station and made a complaint.funny thing was the person who took the complaint was the one that she was complaining about and nothing was done about it until my uncle got posted at that station as his new boss.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Montreal uses the system where the dispatcher notifies a Supervisor every time a chase begins & it is up to him or her to monitor it & call it off when it becomes dangerous. I estimate 90%+ are called off . We used to have a police helicopter which was really useful & avoided a lot of chases but the old budget cut-backs chopped the chopper!
    Dallas has a notification policy like that as well. Most I have heard of were not called off though.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by wilrobnson
    ...He told the sergeant he knew I was going too fast, because:

    a) He had a scanner and "didn't think an accident was a priority call", and

    b) He had a radar on his dash so he knew exactly how fast I was going (55 in a 45).

    Yeah, he eventually went way overboard and added a few red strobes to his grill...
    LOL! Somebody really should make a regular comic strip about guys like that.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Originally posted by Tennsix
    I don't think that is very likely.
    It certainly isn't a likely scenario. I have heard of it, but I can only think of that as the only time I would make an issue out of it. I have never seen it happen.

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  • ycaso77
    replied
    I agree with you whole heartedly. But after a few tragic accidents and an uproar over the poor fleeing criminal being chased by the police for a simple shooting- well you know the vote hungry mayor had to do something. Its a sad day indeed when the criminals know you just have too get a few blocks away at top speed and dump the car- you're home free! As in everything politicians fix for us it's all or nothing.

    Leave a comment:

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