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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by copelandamuffy
    I work for Securitas, and I am an Account Manager, and yes I wear
    a uniform
    In my area, Securitas uses a Site-supervisor and an Operations Manager. The Operations Manager is based at the branch and wears a suit. The Supervisor is in uniform. Account Manager is a title that Guardsmark uses.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307
    When I worked at the mall in Sacramento, we got into a catch 22 situation. While our company prefered the observe/report system, they were not always able to eforce that policy. Case in point- while patrolling the parking lot, I came across some young adults who were drinking beer and hanging out, not shopping. The policy was to tell these folks to leave. Upon my approach, I noted several cases of cigarretts in the back seat of the subjects car. I then called our dispatch to have them report a suspicious circumstance to the sheriff's dept. I was then instructed by the sheriff's dispatch to detain the subject. I complied with the request. After a few minutes, a detective arrived and arrested the subject for burglury of a railroad boxcar. While the arrest was occuring, our company field supervisor arrived and wanted to disipline myself and the other site officer for detaining the subject. The detective told the field supervisor that his two officers had enabled the conclusion of a three month investigation and the only write-up he should make was a letter of commendation for us. So guys, who was right here? The point is that not all cases of detaining someone are cut and dried. Legally, once we were instructed to detain by law enforcement, we were deputized for the time of the incident and company non detention rules were out the window. When security works for any place that is open to the public but is private property, the rules must be flexable. Earlier in another post, I had mentioned that the CHP had scanners with our frequency on them. I recieved a call " CHP to Birdcage security, in the blind, assistance needed at your northwest property line" I responded and the CHP officer told me that he had no back-up available and that the subject he had just stopped had a no-bail warrant for parole violation and that he needed me to assist him with the arrest. So folks, mall security is a little different animal that one cannot place stringent guidelines on.
    Connecticut legally requires one to assist a LEO if so directed.

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    I have just gone through reading 9 pages of the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly about Securitas. I started with Pinkerton in 1972, and sometime in 2003
    Mother Securitas adopted us. I am overall pleased with them. My field supervisior who will send over a floater if I have a need for an extra Officer
    is a real fine person. He roars like a lion, but is gentle as a lamb.

    I also have a caring Branch Manager. Our client paid all the Guards
    Christmas bonuses. The checks came in late for whatever reason.
    The Branch Manager stopped at my site a few day before Christmas,
    to make sure I had my check before Christmas day

    In my branch there are 30 other Account Managers Anyone of these
    Account Managers you would be proud to have them working with you
    All of them are true professionals.

    I have worked at details and special events with men and women
    with Securitas under brutal heat and cold, working at concerts
    and political events when the public and customers were beyond
    rude, and in every event, the Securitas Guards were very professional
    One special musical event, the client stated afterward he has never
    seen men and women working in near 100 degree heat go above and
    beyond what he had asked for


    I will not take the time to say negative things about Securtas.
    I am happy working for them.

    Those are my two cents, your mileage may vary
    Last edited by copelandamuffy; 09-30-2006, 09:26 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Originally posted by Cpt.Xtreme
    Not sure why your having a hard time with my title?

    Account Manager = Person in charge of that specific account, works side by side with the client, hires, fires, writes SOP's, consults with clients department heads when issues are forseen or arise.

    I have, oops will have full control, no phone calls to make, good decision or bad, my decision.
    Also add you wear a pager 24/7. Power goes off at your site at 0300 hours,
    guess who gets paged? And Cpt. Xtreme, let's not forget Account Manager meetings, having to explain why you have overtime when you already have 16 open hours, and add another 16 hours of needs because one of your weekend guards had a minor stroke. I think we are above just being glorified site supervisiors. And as stated working to make the client one happy person so when it time to renew the contract the client will give a "atta boy' and you and the rest of the Guards get pay raises.

    Also if it is the weekend and there is no one to fill open hours it is the
    Account Manager who must do this,

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Originally posted by ff000525
    I have yet to see a uniformed "account manager" for Securitas. I have heard they are out there though. I won't even attempt to rebuke the "best company that I've worked for" statement. I'm much too tired.......
    I work for Securitas, and I am an Account Manager, and yes I wear
    a uniform

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    That's the problem, it IS a catch 22. If you are in an observe and report position, and a LEO asks you for help, expect to be yelled at for being in a position to be asked for help.

    If it all goes good, maybe they'll use it for PR. IF it does BAD (you get hurt or something, while the suspect IS arrested), then forget. Get a letter of comendation from the agency that you assisted and seek better employment.

    The kind of company that demands non-intervention in a public area like a mall is not the kind of company that wants you actually doing anything, even if a LEO says so. The client should recongize this, and if they want you doing something - they need to hire a company that will allow their security staff to interact and enforce.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mall Director
    replied
    I believe this case to be a catch 22 as well. I dont want to differ with anyone here, but include my own experience. When operating in California, under California Penal Code 150, if you are requested by law enforcement to assist them, then by law, you are required to do so, and failure to do so will put you in violation of this penal code. I do know for a fact that in California, if you come onto something criminal in nature or wanted by LE, and refuse to detain or assist, you can be charged as an accessory to the crime itself. I was, back many years ago, on a call which the sheriffs department responded. It was a DV call, and the deputy had made an arrest and placed the subject in the back of his patrol car. I was then instructed to maintain security on the patrol car, and not allow her to be let go, as another male subject was coming to the scene to have issues with the arrest, while the deputy went inside to finish his arrests. As my old boss put it, had the male subject arrived on scene and let her out of the car and I stood by and took no action, then I could be charged with aiding and abbeding a fugitive or arrest subject.

    In heavily populated cities, its not uncommon for LEO to request assistance from Private Security Agencies to assist an officer with an incident, as back up or assistance from their fellow officers is far out from response ro non-existant. I find it myself, to be very good policy to help LE when ever asked to, and be around when they operate, as they have found comfort that they are not out there all alone, and ask for help in most cases. This provides for assistance when we need it in amore persuadable manner.

    One tip you can throw to your supervisor in desregading your write up, especially when it comes to the "insurance issue", is that in California, if you are subjected to asistance of LE, then the Agency (City, State, County) has coverage for those that have been put into aid of a Officer in a criminal incident.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307
    When I worked at the mall in Sacramento, we got into a catch 22 situation. While our company prefered the observe/report system, they were not always able to eforce that policy. Case in point- while patrolling the parking lot, I came across some young adults who were drinking beer and hanging out, not shopping. The policy was to tell these folks to leave. Upon my approach, I noted several cases of cigarretts in the back seat of the subjects car. I then called our dispatch to have them report a suspicious circumstance to the sheriff's dept. I was then instructed by the sheriff's dispatch to detain the subject. I complied with the request. After a few minutes, a detective arrived and arrested the subject for burglury of a railroad boxcar. While the arrest was occuring, our company field supervisor arrived and wanted to disipline myself and the other site officer for detaining the subject. The detective told the field supervisor that his two officers had enabled the conclusion of a three month investigation and the only write-up he should make was a letter of commendation for us. So guys, who was right here?
    The supervisor was right. You violated company policy, as stated, and any injuries you sustained would not be covered under state worker's compensation laws. The detective is not qualified to speak on company matters, and further, the detective is not a security manager and does not know the contractual obligations the company has.

    Originally posted by jeff194307
    The point is that not all cases of detaining someone are cut and dried. Legally, once we were instructed to detain by law enforcement, we were deputized for the time of the incident and company non detention rules were out the window.
    I can only speak for Wiscosnin and Florida, but if a dispatcher tells you to detain something, you are not deputized. It is a "request," and a request made by a non-sworn employee. A non-sworn employee of the police department may not deputize anyone. Only a sworn law enforcement officer may.

    Company non-detention rules are still in effect, even if you are deputized by a law enforcement officer, for the purposes of worker's compensation and vicarious liaiblity assessment. You are, by law, required to comply with the lawful order to assist in an arrest issued by a law enforcement officer - but the company is still 100% liable for your actions. You, on the other hand, are exempt from civil and criminal liability IF its written into the assistance statute. Some states do, some don't.
    Originally posted by jeff194307
    When security works for any place that is open to the public but is private property, the rules must be flexable. Earlier in another post, I had mentioned that the CHP had scanners with our frequency on them. I recieved a call " CHP to Birdcage security, in the blind, assistance needed at your northwest property line" I responded and the CHP officer told me that he had no back-up available and that the subject he had just stopped had a no-bail warrant for parole violation and that he needed me to assist him with the arrest. So folks, mall security is a little different animal that one cannot place stringent guidelines on.
    The rules don't need to be flexible, they need to be clearly written based on the expectations of the client. Remember: You do not work for, nor are you contracted to, the police. It is all well and good that you help them (After all, they may decide to help you), but never should a police/security company relationship take a front seat to the client.

    I say this because I have worked posts were the client was advisarial to the police! I have also seen what happens when a security officer decides to assist the police and the company does not authorize such measures to be taken by their untrained guards. The guard is written up and the police brass gets called. "Don't tell our guards to assist in your police operations, my security guards are there to observe and report to the client."

    Its much simpler for the client to demand from whatever security provider that they will provide employees who are legally and tactically capable of making apprehensions. Legally both in "power of law" and "able to determine when to lawfully arrest." Tactically in "I have the training to effect an arrest," and "I have the equipment to effect an arrest."

    And yes, I have seen a security guard refuse to assist a LEO unless he was specifically ordered to. The man was a retired federal police officer and didn't have so much as a flashlight - his employer forbid it. He liked the job because it was boring. Fortunately, the police officer read between the lines and made it a lawful order, to which the security guard was "back on the job" and assisted.

    Thankfully, it was next door to where I was and I didn't have to worry about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeff194307
    replied
    When I worked at the mall in Sacramento, we got into a catch 22 situation. While our company prefered the observe/report system, they were not always able to eforce that policy. Case in point- while patrolling the parking lot, I came across some young adults who were drinking beer and hanging out, not shopping. The policy was to tell these folks to leave. Upon my approach, I noted several cases of cigarretts in the back seat of the subjects car. I then called our dispatch to have them report a suspicious circumstance to the sheriff's dept. I was then instructed by the sheriff's dispatch to detain the subject. I complied with the request. After a few minutes, a detective arrived and arrested the subject for burglury of a railroad boxcar. While the arrest was occuring, our company field supervisor arrived and wanted to disipline myself and the other site officer for detaining the subject. The detective told the field supervisor that his two officers had enabled the conclusion of a three month investigation and the only write-up he should make was a letter of commendation for us. So guys, who was right here? The point is that not all cases of detaining someone are cut and dried. Legally, once we were instructed to detain by law enforcement, we were deputized for the time of the incident and company non detention rules were out the window. When security works for any place that is open to the public but is private property, the rules must be flexable. Earlier in another post, I had mentioned that the CHP had scanners with our frequency on them. I recieved a call " CHP to Birdcage security, in the blind, assistance needed at your northwest property line" I responded and the CHP officer told me that he had no back-up available and that the subject he had just stopped had a no-bail warrant for parole violation and that he needed me to assist him with the arrest. So folks, mall security is a little different animal that one cannot place stringent guidelines on.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by aka Bull
    Bait perhaps? Not to be attacked, but to lull the criminal element into what they think the security presence is.
    The cops were obvious. They wore heavy body armor under their t-shirts and harley gear, and full duty rigs. I have a feeling that since this was one of the Catholic Church festivals, the guard was present as either:

    1) Tilthing to the Church in services.
    2) The Church tilthing to former Sheriff Schmitt by purchasing a guard.

    Leave a comment:


  • aka Bull
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    .......Why hire a security company when you have police officers? Uniformed presence? Why have police officers looking like bikers with guns if you wanted that? .....
    Bait perhaps? Not to be attacked, but to lull the criminal element into what they think the security presence is.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Cooperation levels completely depend on the agency. Tonight, at a church festival, I saw one unarmed security policeman (That's his title, it's not a sworn position any more than private police officer is in WI) with absolutely nothing - not even a flashlight or a pen.

    His entire job was to roam around for the festival. His uniform looked straight out of the budget bin of Quartermasters. He was wearing the generic Lion badge that said "Security Police." And he was not wearing a nameplate in accordance with WI statute. That was the security. I would observe him roaming from area to area, buying tickets with cash, then buying a soda or a water. He had no method of communications, either.

    Then, I noticed some rather large biker dudes with duty rigs and body armor under their Harley muscle shirts. These were the real security, Kenosha Police Officers. I deduced they were police officers only because they had their badges hanging on their neck, and KPD uses a Honololu Style badge, its very distinctive.

    Why hire a security company when you have police officers? Uniformed presence? Why have police officers looking like bikers with guns if you wanted that?

    The cops made a point not to go near where the security person was, and the security person would wander away from any area where the cops conregated. They moved as a group of 5 at all times.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mall Director
    replied
    So free Panda Express isnt enough? LOL!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Mall Director
    ....

    We had to give our police department a "Sub-Station" to help persued them with our problems.
    Don't forget to throw in a Dunkin' Donuts too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mall Director
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Wow-that would never happen here in Montreal. The Police union is KING! Montreal Police will no longer come to a hotel for a simple theft if there is no possibility for arresting someone. The person is expected to go to the police station & fill out a "Citizen's Report". They are given a copy with an event # that they can give to their insurance. The Neighbourhood Police stations are not near the hotels. At my 2 hotels by the airport we were able to get the police to give us copies or these Citizen Reports. We have the guest fill them out then we fax them to the police station. An Officer adds an event # & faxes it back.

    We tried to set up the same system at the downtown hotel. No way! The union would not agree to it.
    Thats rough, and I truelly sympathize with you! I wish there was some way of getting your Police Department to cooperate quite a bit more with you. I dont find it amusing in the slightest when you are given the help you need and should have in order to provide even the basics of service. Of course, you are in Canada, and to be very honest, I havent a clue as to the police operations in this country. I know each country is different, as I have visited many and found I love the "American" style law enforcement, LOL!

    We had to give our police department a "Sub-Station" to help persued them with our problems.

    Leave a comment:

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