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ever been threatened with arrest after making an arrest?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    In CA, you can lawfully transport your prisoner to a jail, then book them in yourself. You had best be prepared to fill out a booking report, arrest affidavit, and the rest of the paperwork, or your arrest may be deemed invalid due to procedural issues.
    It may be legal to do this, and I am not sure that it is, but not a very good idea. Several years ago there was some sort of argument between school board members during a school board meeting. It was either in Lancaster or Palmdale, which are about 40 miles north of Los Angeles, I forget which. I will see if I can find any other information about the incident.

    The members of the school board decided to place the one board member who was causing all the commotion under citizen's arrest for either disturbing the peace or causing a disturbance on school grounds, both of which are misdemeanors. Instead of calling the police the board members decided to transport the suspect themselves directly to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's station in Lancaster. The school board members found themselves under arrest for kidnapping and false imprisonment. I do not know if anyone actually got convicted, but I will try to find some further information since my curiosity as been aroused.

    It is very likely that any security guard who tries to transport a prisoner to jail or to the courthouse himself will find himself facing similar charges. It is best to always call the police and let them do any transporting necessary.
    Last edited by histfan71; 04-18-2006, 08:07 PM.

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    • #17
      [QUOTE=histfan71][QUOTE=N. A. Corbier]In CA, you can lawfully transport your prisoner to a jail, then book them in yourself. You had best be prepared to fill out a booking report, arrest affidavit, and the rest of the paperwork, or your arrest may be deemed invalid due to procedural issues.

      It may be legal to do this, and I am not sure that it is, but not a very good idea. Several years ago there was some sort of argument between school board members during a school board meeting. It was either in Lancaster or Palmdale, which are about 40 miles north of Los Angeles, I forget which. I will see if I can find any other information about the incident.

      The members of the school board decided to place the one board member who was causing all the commotion under citizen's arrest for either disturbing the peace or causing a disturbance on school grounds, both of which are misdemeanors. Instead of calling the police the board members decided to transport the suspect themselves directly to the Los Angeles County Sheriff's station in Lancaster. The school board members found themselves under arrest for kidnapping and false imprisonment. I do not know if anyone actually got convicted, but I will try to find some further information since my curiosity as been aroused.

      It is very likely that any security guard who tries to transport a prisoner to jail or to the courthouse himself will find himself facing similar charges. It is best to always call the police and let them do any transporting necessary.
      A lot of the things we can do are never a good idea. I think that you'd need a pre-existing agreement with the county sheriff to transport your prisoners under private arrest, so that the jail is ready to recieve your employees, and your employees are well versed in transfer of correctional custody issues.

      I've heard of security companies doing this in CA, but those security companies are now usually Transit Police, or whatever they did with their agency after 9/11. College campuses also came to mind.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #18
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
        I've heard of security companies doing this in CA, but those security companies are now usually Transit Police, or whatever they did with their agency after 9/11. College campuses also came to mind.
        I'm sure your right, but I have never heard of this. Do you remember the names of those companies? I once worked as a security guard for a HUGE hospital and medical school that had multiple facilities spread throughout the city. In fact, the mayor and all the city council members worked for the hospital in some capacity.

        We (the security department) had to transport psych patients from the main hospital, where the ER was, to the psychological hospital, which was about 2 miles down the road. By policy, we were not allowed to handcuff these patients, even though a physician placed them on a valid 72-hour psychological hold. To make matter worse, only two of our patrol cars had prisoner cages, and those two cars were assigned to supervisors. All the other patrol cars had no cages. It would not take a whole lot for a psych patient who was suicidal and who had already been deemed to be a danger to himself and others, to reach over me, grab the steering wheel, and steer the patrol car into the opposite traffic lanes.

        That is one of the major reasons I left that job. When I questioned a supervisor about this practice he told me that something like the scenario I described above had never happened and therefore never will. I hope he was comfortable with all that sand covering his head.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by histfan71
          I'm sure your right, but I have never heard of this. Do you remember the names of those companies? I once worked as a security guard for a HUGE hospital and medical school that had multiple facilities spread throughout the city. In fact, the mayor and all the city council members worked for the hospital in some capacity.

          We (the security department) had to transport psych patients from the main hospital, where the ER was, to the psychological hospital, which was about 2 miles down the road. By policy, we were not allowed to handcuff these patients, even though a physician placed them on a valid 72-hour psychological hold. To make matter worse, only two of our patrol cars had prisoner cages, and those two cars were assigned to supervisors. All the other patrol cars had no cages. It would not take a whole lot for a psych patient who was suicidal and who had already been deemed to be a danger to himself and others, to reach over me, grab the steering wheel, and steer the patrol car into the opposite traffic lanes.

          That is one of the major reasons I left that job. When I questioned a supervisor about this practice he told me that something like the scenario I described above had never happened and therefore never will. I hope he was comfortable with all that sand covering his head.
          I wish I did, unfortunately its anaecdotal.

          ... That's insane. At least the ambulance can strap em down via the psych hold order (attending writing a perscription for chemical or physical restraints).
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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          • #20
            To answer the original question, yes, twice.

            The first time I caught a guy up on a floor of the hotel trying to sell drugs to high school kids. I brought him to his room on another floor, told him to pack & leave. He shoved me. I tackled him, handcuffed him & called the police. There were no witnesses. The police didn't believe he had shoved me. (Didn't help that he was accusing me of shoving him!) Luckly they did a record check. He had a long record. They went to the garage & found the truck he came in. Turns out he stole it from a farm outside of Montreal. He had robbed the farmers. When the police outside of town went to check on them they found them tied up in their farm house. I was not arrested.

            The 2nd time I was dealing with a hysterical prostitute in front of the hotel. (I never found out what she was upset about). As I tried to help her she grabbed my glasses & threw them down the driveway where they bounced & broke into thousands of pieces. She jumped into a taxi & tried to get away. I pulled her out. She fought. I handcuffed her & held her against the wall waiting for the police. I was new. I got too close. She bent down with her hands handcuffed behind her back & grabbed onto a very sensitive area of my body. She wouldn't let go . (I wanted more children ) So with an open hand I hit her on the back of the head, knocking her into the wall. Just as the patrol car pulled up. They did not see what she had been holding onto, only me banging her head into the cement wall. I still don't know how I was able to get out of that one!
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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