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Cops Charged In Beating

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I know. I'll watch over him.
    I agree with Mayor. I knew a kid in my youth who was a plague for deputies. He'd find them sleeping, or doing reports, and SPRAY PAINT THEIR CAR.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Remember. If the cop is on your property, you didn't summon him, he's passed out asleep, and its proven your aware of it...

    If you have a duty to protect persons, it can come back on the liability insurance that you have a duty to protect that sleeping peace officer.
    I know. I'll watch over him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    I would not. If the cop is sleeping in his unit it is just another liability for me to be concerned of. A deputy told me that other deputys from his department have been assualted while parked and writing a report in their unit. They find a rural area on some down time, park there unit, get telescope vision from focusing in on writing their report and BOOM the someone walks up and assaults them.

    With how many people hate cops, I certainly do not think it is safe for one too just doze off in in uniform in there unit. If you really hated cops wouldn't you see that as an oppurtunity????????

    Sorry to go off an that tangent. But, as with Corbier, I wouldn't have a cop on my property sleeping.

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  • talon
    replied
    Please keep in mind...

    Originally posted by talon
    I've always been of the opinion that its better to have one wide awake than two half asleep. I have always napped on night shift if I had a partner that was awake and vice versa. I didn't say sleep all night, but if I was particularly sleepy I don't see anything wrong with catching a quick nap. You always feel more alert and refreshed after a nap...or I always do, It's better than having two zombies on patrol.

    My "opinion" only.
    Please keep in mind most people will not agree with the above statement as most people seem to ignore the realities of the night shift. Most employers want you "awake all night" but if they would only realize that if they allowed a small nap you would avoid the embarassment of having someone else discover your sleeping Officer public or private.

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  • Lawson
    replied
    Ill agree with Talon on that one.

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  • talon
    replied
    Sleeping on the job...

    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    I love it when police park on my properties. They fill out reports, work with the radar, make public contacts, and hey occasionally I may be able to provide them with tidbits of information about people in the vicinity that may end up being leads for suspects. I don't mind if a squad car gets parked on the property with nobody in it. I do mind if some cop is in the squad car sound asleep, just like the photo of that security guard I posted several weeks ago. I mind it even more if it's a two man unit and both of them are reclined and passed out in the same fashion. Not only are those people jeopardizing their own safety, but they are reducing credibility for their department. I want the police department to be respected and to succeed. That will not happen if members of the general public see them sleeping on the job.
    I've always been of the opinion that its better to have one wide awake than two half asleep. I have always napped on night shift if I had a partner that was awake and vice versa. I didn't say sleep all night, but if I was particularly sleepy I don't see anything wrong with catching a quick nap. You always feel more alert and refreshed after a nap...or I always do, It's better than having two zombies on patrol.

    My "opinion" only.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Remember. If the cop is on your property, you didn't summon him, he's passed out asleep, and its proven your aware of it...

    If you have a duty to protect persons, it can come back on the liability insurance that you have a duty to protect that sleeping peace officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    I love it when police park on my properties. They fill out reports, work with the radar, make public contacts, and hey occasionally I may be able to provide them with tidbits of information about people in the vicinity that may end up being leads for suspects. I don't mind if a squad car gets parked on the property with nobody in it. I do mind if some cop is in the squad car sound asleep, just like the photo of that security guard I posted several weeks ago. I mind it even more if it's a two man unit and both of them are reclined and passed out in the same fashion. Not only are those people jeopardizing their own safety, but they are reducing credibility for their department. I want the police department to be respected and to succeed. That will not happen if members of the general public see them sleeping on the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Works great during March Break in the hotels.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I want the person in that marked unit conscious and able to detect attacks against them.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I wouldn't mind that part. They can park here anytime they want. Nothing like having a marked unit on the premises to keep the bad guys away.
    I want the person in that marked unit conscious and able to detect attacks against them.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    ..... Same thing applied to cops who wanted to sleep on my properties. Wake up and find another spot or I'll call your Lt....
    I wouldn't mind that part. They can park here anytime they want. Nothing like having a marked unit on the premises to keep the bad guys away.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    replied
    I make it a point not to find too many things wrong these days. I'm not a supervisor, so don't stir the waters too much, unless it's really blatant and then I certainly will say something to somebody. When I was a supervisor, there was no looking the other way on misconduct.

    If you were asleep on property, you'd be sent home. Determinations for appropriate disciplinary action would be made in the morning. That issue wouldn't always end up with a termination, but oftentimes it would. Same thing applied to cops who wanted to sleep on my properties. Wake up and find another spot or I'll call your Lt.

    Then again, sleeping was the least of worries most of the time. There were guards found with alcohol or drugs, dirty magazines, prostitutes, not wearing a uniform, or not even there. Then we'd have these people who would carry weapons onto the job when they didn't have the proper licensing for it. My favorite one was the guy who brought an asp to work, which he has to have an armed commission for to carry in this state, and was twirling it around like a parade baton while he was walking. He hit himself in the forehead with it before he realized I was there. Losers like these deserved to go home since I saw them as a cancer to the position due to their obvious disregard for morality and common sense. I would rather have the dumbest warm-body security icon who do the job honestly than some smartass who decides he can get away with all the above behavior and then some.

    I used to think only silly security guards would act in this manner since the companies don't do much to screen them psychologically, but I found out wrong. Working around more of the patrol officers in the p.d. when they had a storefront office at one of my properties changed that. I found cops sleeping, regularly, for 6 to 8 hours at a time. Some were found on several occasions having beer parties. One was caught smoking a crack pipe. One was banging a prostitute in the back of the squad car.

    When approached about these things, these people would respond by yelling or cursing, calling me a "smart ass" or saying they would make my life a "living hell." Try to make my life hell, please sir. Oh, by the way, the recording of this conversation will find its way to your commander. And it did. I became pretty intolerant of their misconduct, especially if I had to enforce a zero tolerance policy of misconduct or complacency for my own. Why do they get paid $35k per year to sit on their laurels when I got paid $9 per hour to run my ass off all night for 12 to 14 hours, usually with no lunch break?

    If it was my call to make on the issue of reporting the cops beating someone severely, I would do it in a heartbeat. This officer who reported the others deserves a medal, not degradation which I'm sure she received from numerous people who should know better. Hearing about this reminds me of having to work guard duty in the e.r. and seeing a 14 year old kid get wheeled in with his skull mostly crushed and held together by one of those big bulky helmets. His story was he tried to walk away from the Garland police and they didn't like it. My take on it is bring the real police over to those who did this and lock them up. Now.

    My take on the whole issue is if you sign up for the job, do it. Don't be a bothersome cancer to the whole profession by corrupting yourself and your colleagues. If you just want the feeling of power by putting on the uniform and the gun, do us all a favor and get the hell out. This is why I'm not a supervisor now. I can't "play ball" with a security company when the powers that be want me to look the other way on things like these. Granted, the battle can be won, but after all the nerve-racking stress involved it's just not worth it to me. The last time I was offered a sergeant position I turned it down.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    However, I do draw the line when it comes to....
    Yeah thats what I do; draw the line with a few "deal breakers" that I won't tolerate no matter what, and then I let everything else pretty much just slide.
    Its a good way of being cool about it, this way I don't worry about every thing other SOs do.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by The_Mayor
    .... Yep. But it isn't as extreme as LEs. I have extended PC to other SOs in quite a few manners, that I will admit did breach the line and I won't do it again. (Just little things not Murder, DUI etc.)
    I am guilty of it to some extent. I have known s/o's who slept on duty often, did paper tours, and even brought prohibited weapons to the site. I didn't report it because of the retaliation factor. I have to work with these guys and I don't want to dread coming to work. Therefore, I can understand what happens in some police departments when certain officers are not reported for wrongdoing.

    However, I do draw the line when it comes to stealing, illegal drugs and the like. I can't change the system because I don't have the authority to do so. And even if I did, the office would likely fire me because I would dismiss too many guards. It's a tough situation, but the problem has to be corrected from the top down.

    Leave a comment:

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