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Handling Drunks

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  • #16
    I've found that problem drunks & natural gas explosions have a lot in common.

    If there is too little gas mixed with oxygen or too much gas it will not explode.

    If the person is slightly drunk or fall down drunk they are usually no problem
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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    • #17
      Excessive alcohol consumption usually affects people two ways. Either they get silly and act like a fool, or they become aggressive, combative, and loud. It's the paradox effect. Alcohol is a nervous system depressant and acts in a similar way as do sedatives. Sometimes, a physician will administer a sedative to a patient only to find that they become agitated instead.

      The lesson is that you really have to be on guard when you deal with intoxicated individuals. Otherwise, you may be in for a surprise.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by ozsecuritychic
        i would be friendly but firm with them at the hospital,find out their names so next time when they dont remember you and you remember their name they sit there quietly for a while thinking how does he know my name.
        Nice technique, Chic.

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        • #19
          Drunks

          At our hospital stopping / handling the drunks is our problem. I explane what is going on and why they have to stay if it sinks in good if not it gets repeated, and if they fight us or like last night try to run out, we stop them escort them back to their room and put them in 4 point leather restraints end of story . The PD is hardly ever called. I am an in house officer and by the way it sounds I am glad of that

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          • #20
            I will only deal with the "Otis Campbell" type. The cops can take care of the others.
            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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            • #21
              This is a really interesting topic.

              Over here where I work in N.S.W. and Q.L.D. Australia things get done differently.

              In N.S.W. if you're working on "licenced premises" which the law defines as anywhere that sells liquor you must complete a Responsible Service of Alcohol (R.S.A.) course, and this goes for security too, even tho we don't serve them. Basically we have to babysit people these days as people don't seem to be responsible for their own actions these days In N.S.W. all "licenced premises" must have a liquor licence which is issued by the N.S.W. Dpt of Gaming and Racing. This is then enforced by that department and also Police. All Police stations have a "Licencing sergeant" whos job is to make sure all licenced premises are run properly in that preceint.

              It is against the law in N.S.W. to be on licenced premises intoxicated. Both the patron and licenced premises can be fined by Police. If a person fails to leave a licenced premises when requested, Police can issue a $550 fine to the offender, and they often do! In N.S.W. if a patron becomes violent more often than not that person will be arrested by security and handed over to local Police.

              Q.L.D. is way behind N.S.W. tho. In Q.L.D. if a patron becomes violent it's not uncommon to see a number of guards giving that patron a flogging before being sent on their way. If I had a dollar for everytime I've seen just this happening in Surfers Paradise I'd be a millionare. The lack of professionalism in crowd control in Q.L.D. is frieghtning! The prehistoric laws of not allowing crowd controllers to carry and use handcuffs has a big role to play in this.

              There is no rule book tho on handing intoxicated people. Everyone handles alcohol in different ways. If they are intoxicated they are usually incoherent and nothing sticks upstairs when you talk to them. Sometimes they want to be your best mate, other times they want to tear you apart. Everyones different.

              I've found that for happy drunks that a few jokes i.e. gee mate that left boot of yours looks a bit wobbly etc works well. Still be firm but polite and friendly and make it seem like you're their friend. As for aggressive patrons I simply use the "how are you champ? Hows your night been or look at that sexy blonde over there". By law over here we must use conflict resolution first so I always use the line of "explain to me the problem and lets see if I can help you sort it out."

              Once an intoxicated person tho becomes extremely abusive and threatning violence or actually throws a punch etc then it's time for defensive tactics and a set of handcuffs and charges laid. I've found over the years you really have to have a have a "zero tolerance" on aggressive behavior.

              One thing I do swear by tho, is not shaking the hand of an intoxicated person, no mater how harmless they appear to be. The number of guards I've seen and personally had to rescue after shaking hands with an intoxicated person is alarming. It's just to easy to be taken as a hostage or seriously injured.
              A well trained dog is worth 10 men!

              I can recall my dog, but I can never recall a fired bullet!

              Would you prefer me to use the dog, the Glock, the baton or the O.C. spray? It's your health insurance so you decide. Alternatively there is always the handcuffs, followed by the Police with the court house preceeding rapidly after. Now which service would you like me to utilise

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              • #22
                That's a big thing. Don't shake hands with the general public. You're basically giving them an arm to pull in and entrap. I don't do it. I have never had anyone who wanted to shake my hand who wasn't passive-aggressive.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                  That's a big thing. Don't shake hands with the general public. You're basically giving them an arm to pull in and entrap. I don't do it. I have never had anyone who wanted to shake my hand who wasn't passive-aggressive.

                  Working in the hospitality industry it can be difficult refusing to shake someone's hand but I too don't shake the hand of a drunk or even someone who has been aggressive after he has calmed down.
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                  • #24
                    How many people want to shake your hand, on average? I think it really depends on the social mores of the enviornment, in Florida - nobody wants to touch each other.
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                    • #25
                      Its rare that I'll shake hands, if I am on a social contact or something of that nature, I may, but typically I will tell whoever it is that the policy states I cannot shake hands on duty. Ive even gone so far as to tell someone this after they shook hands with three other officers on scene
                      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                      "The Curve" 1998

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                      • #26
                        It's a big thing over here in Australia to shake hands. Everyone wants to shake hands. Only problem is you don't know where their hands have been. Numerous times I've seen gents visit the mens room, only to walk out and not wash their hands, yukkkk Then at sometime during the night they want to shake hands.

                        It's amazing how quick an outstretched hand can be bent back with a finger under the elbow and will have Mr. Universe begging for mercy.

                        One trick I do use with aggressive drunks or anyone who displays aggressive behavior is that if they do commit and assault that they will then have a criminal record and some countries won't let you into their country if you plan on travelling, not to mention the punishment associated with the stupidity.
                        A well trained dog is worth 10 men!

                        I can recall my dog, but I can never recall a fired bullet!

                        Would you prefer me to use the dog, the Glock, the baton or the O.C. spray? It's your health insurance so you decide. Alternatively there is always the handcuffs, followed by the Police with the court house preceeding rapidly after. Now which service would you like me to utilise

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                        • #27
                          I get the shake my hand request on a daily basis, not ever going to happen. I also get the can you flex your arms for us not going to happen either. People get offended because I dont do what they asked, its not about being rude to them its a personal space thing and keeping safe.I really dont like drunk people who think they can touch me either or women who think its funny to hit on me wilst trying to impress the blokes.

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                            How many people want to shake your hand, on average? I think it really depends on the social mores of the enviornment, >>>in Florida - nobody wants to touch each other.<<<
                            Oh now, Nathan. Thats not at all true. There are a lot of people around here that touch each other. Why, I've had to pull folks apart at times. Found them in areas they shouldn't be in. LOL.

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                            • #29
                              Shaking hands.. ewwww, people carry more illnesses than.. well.. other things..LOL!

                              I recently initiated a new procedure for intoxicated individuals that are semi compliant in our daily operations.. and it alot of fun, if I dare say, for the staff..

                              Typically, we end up with alot of transiant type intoxicated subjects after closing hours. I am not sure why they feel compelled to visit our mall after hours, but its quite a common occurance. Sometimes they attempt to gain entry into the locked facility, or act out of normal charactor due to it being night time, either reason, after collecting up these subjects, we process them with a trespass warning, and used to narmally send them along their way. Bothering our local PD, especially on a friday or saturday night is not beneficial to us or our community, as our LE counterparts do not have the available manpower to get any type of immediate response to our site for an assist. They are handling the rest of the cities issues, and we prefer not to hold a drunk for the 2-3 hour duration before they can come out to get them. So.. we started the "Community Celebration Days" here. At our (cities) Community Celebration Days, its at a local town center, where there are free taxi's, and the first five drinks are free. Being that we dont want some poor intoxicated fellow to have an accident wandering around town in the dark, we offer assistance and can transport the subject to the Community Celebration Days center. Would you believe that we havent had a complaint or denied interest by our intoxicated friend in this event?? So, after placing them into the transport, we drive them to the center. Our patrol vehicle is quite accomodating, tinted windows that are pretty dark in the rear, so for a person riding in the back, its a challenge at night to know where we are going.

                              Once we arrive at this nice Community Celebrations center, at first it seems quite dead and no jumping parties, but thats Ok. We explain to the subject as we let them out, to go ahead and walk inside, go up the stair case to their left, and through the double steel doors at the end of the holiday, at which they are to ask for their five free drink tickets and a ride to where ever they need to go. It works out nicely, and I can say we have been asked only once by one subject "why are there so many cop cars here?". We typically respond that they have to be here to ensure everyones safety during the party. Its amazing how many are so excited and begin their entry into this facility with enthusiasm and anticipation of the fun ahead of them, seriousely. Of course, I wouldnt expect them to know any better, as their current condition inhibits proper thinking.

                              On a few occassions, we get a call 45 minutes later from our pleasant PD sergeant, generally asking for info on a previous case.. ohh, and to let us know they got our package. I have had a few PD officers comment on us doing this as "Bleeped Up", and chuckling.
                              Deputy Sheriff

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                              • #30
                                I seriously doubt any police department in the country would allow you to get away with what you describe. In many states what you are doing is called kidnapping.

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