Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Baton Rouge news report on felon SOs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Baton Rouge news report on felon SOs

    This story aired a couple of nights ago here in Baton Rouge on WBRZ. It tells how easy it is to get a job as a SO and that you begin work while the background check is going on. The checks can take up to 8 weeks in some cases. Here in La the state has issued 2,500 new security licenses since Katrina. After background checks came back it was discovered 500 applicants had criminal backgrounds and 150 had felony charges.
    Watch the report at-
    http://www.2theadvocate.com/wbrz/videos/2475251.html
    Hospital Security Officer

  • #2
    That really sucks. The scary thing is many applicants in my state are turned down after they are found to have felony records, yet they continue to fill out security applications all over the city. You'd figure they'd get a clue.
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

    Comment


    • #3
      Maybe their hoping to slip through the cracks. It should be a misdemeanor to apply for a security position with a felony conviction.
      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Mr. Security
        Maybe their hoping to slip through the cracks. It should be a misdemeanor to apply for a security position with a felony conviction.
        If they lie on their application, (ie. "have you ever been convicted of a felony, theft, assault, family violence, or a crime of moral turpitude?" and they write "no") it is indeed a class A misdemeanor, falsifying a government document, which can land them between 6 months to one year in a county jail and/or a fine of up to $4,000.
        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 1stWatch
          If they lie on their application, (ie. "have you ever been convicted of a felony, theft, assault, family violence, or a crime of moral turpitude?" and they write "no") it is indeed a class A misdemeanor, falsifying a government document, which can land them between 6 months to one year in a county jail and/or a fine of up to $4,000.
          Is this law enforced? Apparently not.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr. Security
            Is this law enforced? Apparently not.
            It can be, but only if the security company brings it to the attention of DPS, who in turn will file "at large" on the person and a warrant will be issued for their arrest. Many security companies see this as too much trouble to go through though, so they just throw the application in the trash and tell the applicant not to come back.
            "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

            Comment


            • #7
              Then the security companies have no one to blame but themselves.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Mr. Security
                Then the security companies have no one to blame but themselves.
                That is my sentiment exactly. Companies love to blame things like the economy, the state government, popular opinion, or even terrorism for their own failures, but what it really boils down to is complacency. There are some standards and practices a company can instill in its own officers, but not only does that training have to be adapted, but back biting politics have to be put aside so the company can run harmoniously. Then, those standards have to be maintained and regulated so that everybody does the same job, anyone who gets put in a leadership position can lead effectively, bad apples are weeded out quickly, and the staff is not overburdened with the stress of incompetence. This is a rare thing for a security company indeed.
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Florida gets around that by issuing a temp license via LiveSCAN at a regional office. You must apply for a temp license in person, submit yourself to a LiveSCAN check, and wait for FDLE/FBI verification.

                  However, your right. If a company took the damn time to

                  1) Revoke licenses
                  2) Report felons who falsify their state applications
                  3) Demand action by the state licensing agency...

                  then it'd be alot harder to get a job in this industry if your a felon.

                  Due note, my state actively encourages enterprise to hire felons. We seem to have alot of them. To the point that it is illegal to discriminate in hiring against someone based on criminal conviction. Security is exempt because of state licensing, since an unlicensed guard cannot work for a company, as the state will not give them a license.

                  But, for non-licensed roles, your pretty much going to hire them. Fear their dishonesty? The state will issue a free 2,500 or 25,000 "fidelity bond" to your agency for the employee's actions.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Reading these posts is depressing. One can only assume or surmise as long as the security company's bottom line is not impacted, toss and forget.
                    For the rest of us who are trying to make a difference, we are shoveling sand against the tide.
                    Enjoy the day,
                    Bill

                    Comment

                    Leaderboard

                    Collapse
                    Working...
                    X