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  • #31
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Play nice, children...

    Also, I like the smokey bear hat way better than the damn baseball cap. Your at work, not at the ball park.
    I still like the top hats we wear. Funny, not everybody in the company thinks so though
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Mr. Security
      ...If he does and the unarmed guard is not a physical threat, the last thing that most robbers want to do is 'turn up the heat' by murdering the guard.
      This is true for the type of suspect who does not want trouble. On the other hand, there is another type of suspect out there who is a lot more brazen who would murder the guard first. I can think of four cases off the top of my head that happened locally where security guards were murdered and they were not putting up a fight. Two of them were unarmed. The bad guy just saw a uniform and opened fire.
      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by 1stWatch
        This is true for the type of suspect who does not want trouble. On the other hand, there is another type of suspect out there who is a lot more brazen who would murder the guard first. I can think of four cases off the top of my head that happened locally where security guards were murdered and they were not putting up a fight. Two of them were unarmed. The bad guy just saw a uniform and opened fire.
        So, if the other two were armed, then the end result was the same for them as the two unarmed guards, right?
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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        • #34
          I wouldnt know about that. If I was a bank robber, I would be a lot more comfortable knowing the guard wouldnt have a chance of fighting back. My gun vs. his fists. If I saw a guard with a gun, I might think twice before even going inside.
          "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
          "The Curve" 1998

          Comment


          • #35
            This is why banks hire deputy sheriffs. The deputy is armed, empowered by the state to use lethal and non-lethal force in the name of the state, and is more "professional looking."

            If the armed security officer is professional looking, armed with modern weapons, obviously able to radio for help, and gives the appearance of professionalism (Gotta mention that twice) then the deterrence is the same as a police officer. "This man will either kill me, or get me caught."
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
              .... If I saw a guard with a gun, I might think twice before even going inside.
              You're right. And if you were determined, you would take whatever steps were necessary to neutralize the greater threat (armed s/o), including superior firepower and perhaps a partner.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                This is why banks hire deputy sheriffs. The deputy is armed, empowered by the state to use lethal and non-lethal force in the name of the state, and is more "professional looking."

                If the armed security officer is professional looking, armed with modern weapons, obviously able to radio for help, and gives the appearance of professionalism (Gotta mention that twice) then the deterrence is the same as a police officer. "This man will either kill me, or get me caught."
                Now that makes more sense. Access to better firepower (AR-15) and plenty of back up as opposed to the guard with a 40-caliber semi-automatic and no b/u.
                Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Mr. Security
                  Now that makes more sense. Access to better firepower (AR-15) and plenty of back up as opposed to the guard with a 40-caliber semi-automatic and no b/u.
                  There's no AR-15 if your doing bank duty. You may have access to your cruiser, you may not. Generally, you check an older car out. You will also not be able to run to it during the robbery.

                  The backup, in all cases, comes from the alarm or radio traffic. A security officer properly equipped with a radio will have his dispatcher call for assistance. The deputy's dispatcher will dispatch the local police - usually - since they have a quicker response time than the deputies who patrol outside the city.

                  Either way, make no mistake, in a bank robbery, you are alone.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
                    No business plan, yet you're already picking out vehicles, badges and uniforms. Someone's putting the cart before the horse...
                    I don't know why you are so negative. Almost everything we see out of you is negativity. Picking out badges and other business related things and sharing them with others, maybe someone can gain information such as pricing or even vendor names wich I have seen N.A provide.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                      This is why banks hire deputy sheriffs. The deputy is armed, empowered by the state to use lethal and non-lethal force in the name of the state, and is more "professional looking."
                      Here, IF there is a armed guard in a bank it's a Baton Rouge Police officer doing 'extra duty'; ie Rent-a-Cop. I've seen armed security guards in grocery stores and shopping centers but, at least at the banks I got to, I only see uniformed Police on guard.
                      Hospital Security Officer

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Mr. Security
                        You're right. And if you were determined, you would take whatever steps were necessary to neutralize the greater threat (armed s/o), including superior firepower and perhaps a partner.
                        Someone that determined would also take the same steps for police officers working the same position. A good example would be the "takeover bandits" that robbed a bank in Richardson, TX and outgunned police in nearby Plano, TX with assault rifles last year. That incident was the impetus for police around here to carry AR-15 rifles as a standard practice, but the idea remains the security plan was defeated. This is a deviation from the standard robbery practice where one comes in with a threatening note or just walks up to the clerk and makes a statement. I and several others I work with have personally arrested suspects who robbed stores at places where we were assigned. None of them were so brazen. If they were they would not care if it was security or police, they would kill first and ask questions later.
                        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                          There's no AR-15 if your doing bank duty. You may have access to your cruiser, you may not. Generally, you check an older car out. You will also not be able to run to it during the robbery.

                          The backup, in all cases, comes from the alarm or radio traffic. A security officer properly equipped with a radio will have his dispatcher call for assistance. The deputy's dispatcher will dispatch the local police - usually - since they have a quicker response time than the deputies who patrol outside the city.

                          Either way, make no mistake, in a bank robbery, you are alone.
                          During the act of a bank robbery, you are alone. If you're there, just pray you don't get killed while they're there if they're brandishing weapons. Your first duty after the robbery takes place is to the victims, not to the suspect. Render aid to the wounded, cordon off the scene, and report the incident to police asap. During the robbery, turn your radio off. Keying up on that squawk box is just about the quickest way to spook a nervous bad guy into shooting somebody. If you have a cell phone in your pocket and you can get to it, have it call 911, turn the volume all the way down, and leave the line open with it in your pocket. Talk on it only after the suspect has cleared. A silent duress alarm can be one of the most useful things, but just pray the local police aren't foolish enough to run code 3 to the whole thing. They're not supposed to, but it does happen. The only possible point of engagement is if/when the suspect gets to the door. A good response can be effected with multiple officers on site with a well trained contingency. In any case, the point made here is if you're alone when this type of incident happens, you're the guy in the uniform. It doesn't matter if you're security or police at that time. It is worked the same way.
                          "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by 1stWatch
                            During the act of a bank robbery, you are alone. If you're there, just pray you don't get killed while they're there if they're brandishing weapons. Your first duty after the robbery takes place is to the victims, not to the suspect. Render aid to the wounded, cordon off the scene, and report the incident to police asap. During the robbery, turn your radio off. Keying up on that squawk box is just about the quickest way to spook a nervous bad guy into shooting somebody. If you have a cell phone in your pocket and you can get to it, have it call 911, turn the volume all the way down, and leave the line open with it in your pocket. Talk on it only after the suspect has cleared. A silent duress alarm can be one of the most useful things, but just pray the local police aren't foolish enough to run code 3 to the whole thing. They're not supposed to, but it does happen. The only possible point of engagement is if/when the suspect gets to the door. A good response can be effected with multiple officers on site with a well trained contingency. In any case, the point made here is if you're alone when this type of incident happens, you're the guy in the uniform. It doesn't matter if you're security or police at that time. It is worked the same way.
                            All good points 1stWatch.
                            Might I add also that as you the SO become accustomed to the rythm of the operations at the bank or any other place that is a high value target you develope a sense of when "something ain't right here" even before it becomes obvious. In other words you develope What is known as Situational Awareness that helps you get ahead of the curve if by just a little.

                            To develope this you MUST be observant....a typical note-to-teller robbery may not develope into a strongarm but it can and you would have only seconds to decide. If it is Take-over style you would only have fractions of a second.

                            In your assignments look around and really think about some of the things that can happen...what are the possibilities?...Where are the weak points in both hard security and in reactive security? (alarm systems, video surviellance, locks/lockdowns, SOs and LE)...How would you react?

                            If it is a take-over and a guy has an AK-47 pointed at you I doubt you would try to draw your weapon..at least I hope not.

                            Just a few points to ponder

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              I must say that after working several years off and on at other companys I can really see now how the "warm body" moniker came about. I am for the first time really proud of the position I have. The respect the company shows its employees is lightyears away from the rest I've been in.

                              BTW, after the little talk I had with the Capt. the other day, I found out that it was a fluke and she had no info on my work wish list. (ie..armed only, no call in without 24 hrs notice) and was very apologetic about it. I worked it anyway to help out as she was nice and apologetic about it, but it cost the Company as it is what is called a TSO level post and I received CPO level pay for it. And two bleeding blisters on my feet from walking so much!

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by medic15al
                                I must say that after working several years off and on at other companys I can really see now how the "warm body" moniker came about. I am for the first time really proud of the position I have. The respect the company shows its employees is lightyears away from the rest I've been in.

                                Exact same reasons I like working for this company. Everything Ive seen is done very professionally, I have received more training than any company Ive worked for in the past has even dreamed of, and it seems the advancement opportunities are endless. One of my goals... (out of many, havent decided which to pursue yet) is to be an SPO for Wackenhut. They've got some pretty nice accounts, including NASA Space Center.
                                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                                "The Curve" 1998

                                Comment

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