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Do You Think This Is Grounds For Termination?

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  • CameraMan
    replied
    Our yearly sensitivity training is not one but two lawyers lecturing us for an hour on what you can and cannot say to a customer or to a fellow employee, what a supervisor can and cannot say to you, what rights you legally have as an employee, where to go to complain (Human Resources), what legal rights you have if Human Resources doesn't do anything, and where you go to file a legal complaint against the company.

    Followed by 30-45 minutes of my beloved fellow employees asking the craziest, raunchiest, most insane questions they can think of, follwoed by "...so, is that allowed?". This goes on until someone cracks up and the boss chases us out.

    Leave a comment:


  • YANG
    replied
    Yes. Most definately. I would of fired you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by Johnny JJ View Post
    They'll make you hold hands with a guy for an hour
    Perhaps the guy you discriminated against? LOL


    Seriously, you're employed to ensure your clients SOP's are enforced/applied, the fact that you not only applied an unfair standard you also displayed your personal opinions before the client's staff in an unprofessional tone/manner... would you have made a female surrender their purse prior to entry? BTW never hear of Man bags? (70's trend)


    Todays keywords are "impartial application of client policies"

    Leave a comment:


  • theconstipated1
    replied
    You are going to be the only straight person in that room. They are gonna have you watch a video with a bunch of gay people just to see how you react towards them. After that they are gonna come on to you,if they don`t get any reaction out of you,you are good to go back to the field.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny JJ
    replied
    They'll make you hold hands with a guy for an hour

    Leave a comment:


  • The Enforcer
    replied
    Today at work, my boss stopped by and told me that I have to do one hour of sensitivity training at the agency's local office. It's really to cover both our asses in case the Area Vice President finds out so I think it's a good idea. Will probably have to see a video or something.

    Leave a comment:


  • OFFICER HILL
    replied
    if i had been your sup i would have can u on the spot if u store policy stats thst tell the guy to wait a sec go get store manager let him deal with it and document it in security or anything u do live by this C.Y.O.A COVER YOUR OWN AS* .
    ________
    girlfriend pic
    Last edited by OFFICER HILL; 01-26-2011, 01:30 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ddog
    replied
    We are restricted from saying anything to employers employees as well as customers. Broadcasting this where VP's 30' away (for example) can hear you is unexcusable. Small talk is about all you can say, even to Security employees officially; but in reality, they are the only ones you can speak your mind. However, you have to watch out for the many losers who do not work and want any excuse to create havoc in organization, so they can float along unnoticed.

    As for being totally fired, I know first hand how many new hires you go through to get an acceptable, not to mention decent, employees. The older you get, hopefully it will be accompanied by being wiser. WE ALL grow each and every day. Just learn to hold commnets back like that, and you will do a lot better. Stick with policy statements, and get clarification from your employer about what you should have done so the next time there will be little questions in your performance.

    Gays are everywhere. Management can't afford to lose their job from a blatant taboo remark against the company's customer base: he was kind in not demanding your firing immediately, just based on the chance you could wind up back in their store later. Just don't drink in a soiled glass after a gay, lol.

    Leave a comment:


  • TACTICAL 785
    replied
    Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
    Just my opinion here, but if I were the head of LP for the chain - you would not be allowed to work in any of the stores of the chain.
    I agree.

    Professionalism is key in any security or loss prevention field. A un-Bias attitude is essential for doing a good job in our fields. If I was your boss, I would of removed you from the contract and more then likely removed you from the company.

    A comments like that in today’s day and age is un-called for. How dose the differ from using a racial slur? You know what for sham on you sir.

    Leave a comment:


  • Deputy Medic
    replied
    Okay I'll chime in here. If I were in charge these changes would be made.

    1. The purse policy would go bye-byes.
    2. You would attend some remedial discrimination/law training and would recieve a verbal reprimand.

    The potential for liability on the part of your employer is sky high. If that customer had sued, you could bet that you'd be the first person thrown under the bus.

    If you had caught this man in the actual act of theft, most likely even you had it on tape, the remark you made would have caused your supervisors to drop all charges, most likely fire you. Then the patron could have sued both the store an you.

    Bottom line, be courteous, be fair, keep your opinions to yourself. Hope you learned something and didn't lose your job over this unfortunate lapse in judgment.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    I understand that what I did may be considered unacceptable; I just don't think I did anything wrong.
    I'm having a hard time believing that you do not believe that the use of derogatory language of any kind about any "class" of people - whether it is made to them or about them - while on the job is not "wrong" on several levels.

    Most importantly, it's what we used to call "stinkin' thinkin'". Neither you nor your employer is well served by prejudice against classes of people for the simple reason that "classes" of people don't "do" anything that is of interest from a security standpoint. INDIVIDUALS, however, do...by which I mean individuals from every class of people, including those you think are "acceptable".

    So while you're tying up your brain with a prejudice toward someone who is "unacceptable", someone who fits your idea of "acceptable" people is over in a corner robbing you blind. The mind cannot think about two things simultaneously, no matter what we say about "multitasking".

    Lose the prejudices. They short-circuit your thinking and don't help you in your job even one little bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnny JJ
    replied
    In an official capacity, you should only be looking at it from your represented company's view: whether society or you find something wrong or unacceptable is semantics: you act in accordance with your company policy. I highly doubt they make any allowance for petty bigoted name calling.

    I worked for a company once and was paired with a Hammerskin, one of the most hard core white nationalist groups still around. Tattoos everywhere, shaved head, braces under his uniform shirt, the works. But he still treated blacks, flaming gays, obvious jews, etc with nothing but the utmost professional courtesy. He never went out of his way to single out someone based on his perception of societal norms and never said a single derogetory comment about anyone.

    Did I agree wholy with his views? No. Did some? Sure. Did anyone ever question his professional commitment or capability to perform in uniform? Never.

    You're obviously not a hardcore racist or whatever. Your views are formed (presumably) through experience and opinion too complex to properly debate and that's fine. The great thing about diversity is that we can all have our own opinions and beliefs, whether it be your opinion on how the economy should be run to one's opinion on homosexuality and the influences thereof. What the problem boils down to, however, are the actions and performance in service to a larger body of people, while in their uniform: Your actions speak on their behalf unfortunately. Hence, the need to carry oneself professionally is very important and that's why your actions and words were unacceptable: Not because of the beliefs behind them, but what they represent
    Last edited by Johnny JJ; 08-18-2008, 12:53 PM.

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  • Son-Of-A-Pilot
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    What is the difference between "unacceptable" and "wrong"?
    Originally posted by The Enforcer View Post
    "Unacceptable" is how segments of society may look upon something. To think something is "wrong" is simply related to one's own common sense. This is the distinction I see anyway.
    I am not sure you are getting the right definition or at least going far enough with your understanding of these words. I would agree with your definition of "Unacceptable" but I don't think you go far enough with the definition of "Wrong."

    The word "Wrong" means that something is in error (ie: wrong way, wrong choice, wrong word). That gets to the meat of your original post. Both words are accurate in describing what you said about the man who entered the dollar store.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Enforcer
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    What is the difference between "unacceptable" and "wrong"?
    "Unacceptable" is how segments of society may look upon something. To think something is "wrong" is simply related to one's own common sense. This is the distinction I see anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    Originally posted by The Enforcer View Post
    it would be bye bye to you...the fact that you don't seem to understand what you did is unacceptable confirms my original judgment...
    I understand that what I did may be considered unacceptable; I just don't think I did anything wrong.
    What is the difference between "unacceptable" and "wrong"?

    Leave a comment:

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