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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    Wow, that's a lot of stuff to read. I'm sure I'll finish it by the end of the week.
    My safety methods are a bit more simple. You know - shoot and move, shoot and move, that kind of thing.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by jakeslife
    Good advice.
    Alas, its illegal for me to do so in this state unless I carry openly.

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  • jakeslife
    replied
    Good advice.
    Attached Files

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    One Final Step...

    After you have thoroughly applied all of the suggestions posted above, please remember to take this final step:

    Put your head between your knees and kiss your butt goodbye anyhow!

    Sorry, I couldn't help myself.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Part Six

    Be aware that any metal detected at the checkpoint must be identified. If you set off the alarm, you will be required to undergo secondary screening, including a hand-held metal detector and a pat-down inspection
    You can remove metal items at the security checkpoint and place them in the bins provided. The bins will be sent through the X-ray machine. You can save time; however, by not wearing metal items or by placing such items in your carry-on baggage before you get in line.
    TIP: Avoid wearing clothing, jewelry, or other accessories that contain metal when traveling.
    Jewelry (pins, necklaces, bracelets, rings, watches, earrings, body piercing, cuff links, lanyard or bolo tie).
    Shoes with steel tips (safety shoes), heels, shanks, buckles or nails.
    Clothing with metal buttons, snaps or studs.
    Metal hair barrettes or other hair decoration
    Belt buckles.
    Under-wire brassieres.

    Hidden items such as body piercing may result in a pat-down inspection. They may asked to remove your body piercing in private as an alternative to the pat-down search.

    TIP: Avoid placing metal items in your pockets.

    Keys, loose change and lighters.
    Mobile phones, pagers and personal digital assistants (PDAs).

    TIP: Instead, place jewelry and other metal items in your carry-on baggage until you clear security.

    TIP: Pack your outer coat or jacket in your baggage when possible.

    Outer coats including trench coats, ski jackets, leather jackets, overcoats and parkas must go through the X-ray machine for inspection. If you choose to wear an outer coat to the checkpoint, you will need to either place it in your carry-on or put it in the bin that is provided for you. You will not need to remove suit jackets or blazers unless requested by the screener.
    In an effort to try and better educate the air traveler and expedite the travel experience, the FAA has created a list of security tips for air travelers. It includes such items as what you cannot bring in carry-on luggage, as well as tips on checking in.

    PERMITTED AND PROHIBITED ITEMS

    Prohibited items are weapons, explosives, and incendiaries and include items that are seemingly harmless but may be used as weapons?the so-called ?dual use? items. You may not bring these items to security checkpoints without authorization.

    If you bring a prohibited item to the checkpoint, you may be criminally and/or civilly prosecuted or, at the least, asked to rid yourself of the item. A screener and/or Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) will make this determination, depending on what the item is and the circumstances. This is because bringing a prohibited item to a security checkpoint?even accidentally?is illegal.

    For updates and for more information, visit TSA?s website at www.TSATravelTips.us or call the Consumer Response Center toll-tree at 1-866-289-9673 or email [email protected]www.nsc.org

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Part Four

    (b) Placing the international certificate of vaccination with the employee passport?

    (c) Determining medical and dental health is stable?

    (d) Insuring employee knows their medications and medical history?

    (e) Insuring appropriate medications including antibiotics for traveler?s diarrhea and other infections suspected are properly labeled packed in carry-on luggage?

    (f) Insuring employee carries extra pairs of prescription glasses and/or contact lenses?

    (g) Assist employee in reviewing medical insurance to insure coverage abroad?

    (h) Provide employee with a personal first-aid kit?

    (i) Provide or strongly recommend packing appropriate nutritional bars?

    NOTE: *The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued its first safety and health bulletin advising business travelers of health risks abroad.

    The bulletin lists precautions to take when visiting developing countries, as well as warnings for those traveling to other destinations. Travelers can access these on OSHA?s Web site by visiting http://www.osha.gov/dts/tib and selecting ?Safety and Health During International Travel? in ?2002? column.

    According to the US Department of Commerce, there has been a significant increase in recent years in the number of US residents visiting countries where they are at risk for contracting infectious diseases. In 1998, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 59% of such travelers had not taken any preventive medication, and 13% had not been prescribed a drug not recommended for the area to which they were traveling.

    To combat the failure of travelers to receive preventive medication?resulting in unnecessary illness, medical expense and the potential spread of contagious diseases within travelers? local communities?OSHA refers readers to two other sources: Health Information for International Travel, www.cdc.gov/travel; and the US Department of State?s Web site, http://www.travel.state.gov[email protected]) Check for holes in the wall especially across from the bathroom or bed. A hole may provide a view from another room. If this is the case, the traveler should request another room and advise hotel/motel security of their observations.

    6 Are travelers reminded to look under a vehicle as they approach it to insure would be assailants are not hiding under the vehicle? If not, explain why not?

    (b) When travelers frequently visit the same city or location, are they always lodged in the same hotel or motel? Why? Is security management aware of such arrangements? If not, explain why not?

    (c) If travelers are always lodged in the same hotel or motel, are they booked into the same rooms? Why? Suspicion should be raised that audio and visual surveillance could be conducted.

    (d) Are prostitutes or escort service personnel known to frequent the hotel or motel? Is security management aware of such involvement? If so, are there any counterintelligence or blackmail implications? Any documented?

    (e) Are there documented industrial espionage incidents or cases stemming from liaisons in the hotel or motel? Both male and female prostitutes have been known to use nipple rouge containing an anesthetic, drugging the unsuspecting traveler. Security management should not underestimate the Sexpionage or sputnik threats!

    (3) Are employees encouraged to carry only traveler?s checks? Does the corporation pay service charges?

    (4) To the maximum extent possible, consistent with sound business practices, when foreign travel is involved, does security management insist on the use of US flagged carriers with proven security and safety records?

    (5) Does security management insist on the use of financially sound carriers (air, rail, and road)?

    (6) When organic travel assets are involved, is all travel, except local, coordinated with security management?

    (7) Are travel itineraries coordinated with security management in all instances? Any exceptions?

    (8) Prior to departure does security management provide the traveler with up-to-date FACTUAL

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    http://www.ds-osac.org.

    (b) Another source of useful information on international travel is the government publication ?A Safe Trip Abroad,? found at http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/t...p/safetrip.htmhttp://travel.state.gov) concerning foreign safety and security issues to include airport security? Before a travel outside the US, does management provide?

    (a) Consulting a travel medicine professional well before departure?

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Good points Bill. Just to add a couple of suggestions (hope I didn't miss it in your posts):

    - Keep your extra keys at home locked in a key box to prevent a burglar from taking any cars, motorcycles, etc. that may be at home when you are away.

    - Use caution when requesting help over a CB radio because your car has broken down. Unscrupulous individuals may respond to your location. A cell phone is preferred.

    - If you are approached by a carjacker while getting into your car, you may want to carefully toss your keys TOWARD the carjacker so that his reflex to catch them distracts him from aiming and firing his gun if you decide to make a run for it.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied

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  • Bill Warnock
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