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  • Don't be a crime victim.

    Like most predators, lions usually target weak, ill, or isolated prey. Why? Because a kill is more likely and the risk of injury to the lion(s) is minimized. The same is true with human predators. In most cases, they are looking for an easy hit. What can one do to avoid becoming a victim?

    - Be alert to your surroundings. Are you alone? Is it dark? What kind of area is it? Don't be afraid to cross the street or turn and walk the other way if you see or sense danger. Run if need be. Many criminals are too lazy to pursue when they can easily target someone else.

    - When driving alone at night, always leave sufficient room between you and the car in front of you so that you are not trapped if someone approaches your vehicle on foot. If you are being carjacked, do not try to save your car. Give up the keys and, if you can, try to run away while screaming "fire." Even police officers that practice regularly at a gun range know that it can be difficult to hit a moving target. Better that then to allow the criminal to take you to crime scene number 2, i.e., an isolated area where you can be raped and/or shot execution style.

    Also, check your mirrors frequently to ensure that you are not being followed home. If you discern that you are, drive to a public place and call 911. If someone "bumps" into your car in an isolated area, you may decide to turn on your hazards and slowly drive to a safer area before exiting your car and exchanging documentation. It is a good idea to avoid routines when driving and performing other functions. Vary your activities, the route, time, and so forth. Don't be predictable.

    - If a stranger asks to use your phone at home, offer to make the call for them. Don't hand them your cordless phone because you can't dial out for help if they keep the phone on-line. Look out the window to see who is there before you open the door. If you are not comfortable, don't answer the door.

    - Be careful if a stranger approaches you on the street with a question. They may be trying to distract you in hopes that you will let your guard down.

    - When riding mass transit such as the subway, always stand. It's easier, psychologically and physically, to move away from potential danger. If you notice that the subway car that you're riding in is emptying out, consider moving to one that is occupied by more people. If you sense that you are in imminent danger, don't hesitate to get off the train and catch the next one. If you do get off the train, be alert to whether the platform is isolated or not. Otherwise, the perpetrator may just get off with you.

    What else can you, as a Security/LE officer, add to the suggestions above?
    Last edited by Mr. Security; 03-05-2006, 04:20 PM. Reason: Grammar
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    Like most predators, lions usually target weak, ill, or isolated prey. Why? Because a kill is more likely and the risk of injury to the lion(s) is minimized. The same is true with human predators. In most cases, they are looking for an easy hit. What can one do to avoid becoming a victim?

    - Be alert to your surroundings. Are you alone? Is it dark? What kind of area is it? Don't be afraid to cross the street or turn and walk the other way if you see or sense danger. Run if need be. Many criminals are too lazy to pursue when they can easily target someone else.

    - When driving alone at night, always leave sufficient room between you and the car in front of you so that you are not trapped if someone approaches your vehicle on foot. If you are being carjacked, do not try to save your car. Give up the keys and, if you can, try to run away while screaming "fire." Even police officers that practice regularly at a gun range know that it can be difficult to hit a moving target. Better that then to allow the criminal to take you to crime scene number 2, i.e., an isolated area where you can be raped and/or shot execution style.

    Also, check your mirrors frequently to ensure that you are not being followed home. If you discern that you are, drive to a public place and call 911. If someone "bumps" into your car in an isolated area, you may decide to turn on your hazards and slowly drive to a safer area before exiting your car and exchanging documentation. It is a good idea to avoid routines when driving and performing other functions. Vary your activities, the route, time, and so forth. Don't be predictable.

    - If a stranger asks to use your phone at home, offer to make the call for them. Don't hand them your cordless phone because you can't dial out for help if they keep the phone on-line. Look out the window to see who is there before you open the door. If you are not comfortable, don't answer the door.

    - Be careful if a stranger approaches you on the street with a question. They may be trying to distract you in hopes that you will let your guard down.

    - When riding mass transit such as the subway, always stand. It's easier, psychologically and physically, to move away from potential danger. If you notice that the subway car that you're riding in is emptying out, consider moving to one that is occupied by more people. If you sense that you are imminent danger, don't hesitate to get off the train and catch the next one. If you do get off the train, be alert to whether the platform is isolated or not. Otherwise, the perpetrator may just get off with you.

    What else can you, as a Security/LE officer, add to the suggestions above?
    Will send some info from my guide for the benefit of our fellow professionals. I should have done it before.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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    • #3
      May I add that with the low cost of cameras mounting one that has at least listening capability so you can see and hear who is at the door can help offset potential problems.

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      • #4
        [email protected]

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                • #9
                  Good points Bill. Just to add a couple of suggestions (hope I didn't miss it in your posts):

                  - Keep your extra keys at home locked in a key box to prevent a burglar from taking any cars, motorcycles, etc. that may be at home when you are away.

                  - Use caution when requesting help over a CB radio because your car has broken down. Unscrupulous individuals may respond to your location. A cell phone is preferred.

                  - If you are approached by a carjacker while getting into your car, you may want to carefully toss your keys TOWARD the carjacker so that his reflex to catch them distracts him from aiming and firing his gun if you decide to make a run for it.
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                  • #10

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                      • #12
                        http://www.ds-osac.org.

                        (b) Another source of useful information on international travel is the government publication ?A Safe Trip Abroad,? found at http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/t...p/safetrip.htmhttp://travel.state.gov) concerning foreign safety and security issues to include airport security? Before a travel outside the US, does management provide?

                        (a) Consulting a travel medicine professional well before departure?

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                        • #13
                          Part Four

                          (b) Placing the international certificate of vaccination with the employee passport?

                          (c) Determining medical and dental health is stable?

                          (d) Insuring employee knows their medications and medical history?

                          (e) Insuring appropriate medications including antibiotics for traveler?s diarrhea and other infections suspected are properly labeled packed in carry-on luggage?

                          (f) Insuring employee carries extra pairs of prescription glasses and/or contact lenses?

                          (g) Assist employee in reviewing medical insurance to insure coverage abroad?

                          (h) Provide employee with a personal first-aid kit?

                          (i) Provide or strongly recommend packing appropriate nutritional bars?

                          NOTE: *The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued its first safety and health bulletin advising business travelers of health risks abroad.

                          The bulletin lists precautions to take when visiting developing countries, as well as warnings for those traveling to other destinations. Travelers can access these on OSHA?s Web site by visiting http://www.osha.gov/dts/tib and selecting ?Safety and Health During International Travel? in ?2002? column.

                          According to the US Department of Commerce, there has been a significant increase in recent years in the number of US residents visiting countries where they are at risk for contracting infectious diseases. In 1998, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 59% of such travelers had not taken any preventive medication, and 13% had not been prescribed a drug not recommended for the area to which they were traveling.

                          To combat the failure of travelers to receive preventive medication?resulting in unnecessary illness, medical expense and the potential spread of contagious diseases within travelers? local communities?OSHA refers readers to two other sources: Health Information for International Travel, www.cdc.gov/travel; and the US Department of State?s Web site, http://www.travel.state.gov[email protected]com) Check for holes in the wall especially across from the bathroom or bed. A hole may provide a view from another room. If this is the case, the traveler should request another room and advise hotel/motel security of their observations.

                          6 Are travelers reminded to look under a vehicle as they approach it to insure would be assailants are not hiding under the vehicle? If not, explain why not?

                          (b) When travelers frequently visit the same city or location, are they always lodged in the same hotel or motel? Why? Is security management aware of such arrangements? If not, explain why not?

                          (c) If travelers are always lodged in the same hotel or motel, are they booked into the same rooms? Why? Suspicion should be raised that audio and visual surveillance could be conducted.

                          (d) Are prostitutes or escort service personnel known to frequent the hotel or motel? Is security management aware of such involvement? If so, are there any counterintelligence or blackmail implications? Any documented?

                          (e) Are there documented industrial espionage incidents or cases stemming from liaisons in the hotel or motel? Both male and female prostitutes have been known to use nipple rouge containing an anesthetic, drugging the unsuspecting traveler. Security management should not underestimate the Sexpionage or sputnik threats!

                          (3) Are employees encouraged to carry only traveler?s checks? Does the corporation pay service charges?

                          (4) To the maximum extent possible, consistent with sound business practices, when foreign travel is involved, does security management insist on the use of US flagged carriers with proven security and safety records?

                          (5) Does security management insist on the use of financially sound carriers (air, rail, and road)?

                          (6) When organic travel assets are involved, is all travel, except local, coordinated with security management?

                          (7) Are travel itineraries coordinated with security management in all instances? Any exceptions?

                          (8) Prior to departure does security management provide the traveler with up-to-date FACTUAL

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                          • #14

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                            • #15
                              Part Six

                              Be aware that any metal detected at the checkpoint must be identified. If you set off the alarm, you will be required to undergo secondary screening, including a hand-held metal detector and a pat-down inspection
                              You can remove metal items at the security checkpoint and place them in the bins provided. The bins will be sent through the X-ray machine. You can save time; however, by not wearing metal items or by placing such items in your carry-on baggage before you get in line.
                              TIP: Avoid wearing clothing, jewelry, or other accessories that contain metal when traveling.
                              Jewelry (pins, necklaces, bracelets, rings, watches, earrings, body piercing, cuff links, lanyard or bolo tie).
                              Shoes with steel tips (safety shoes), heels, shanks, buckles or nails.
                              Clothing with metal buttons, snaps or studs.
                              Metal hair barrettes or other hair decoration
                              Belt buckles.
                              Under-wire brassieres.

                              Hidden items such as body piercing may result in a pat-down inspection. They may asked to remove your body piercing in private as an alternative to the pat-down search.

                              TIP: Avoid placing metal items in your pockets.

                              Keys, loose change and lighters.
                              Mobile phones, pagers and personal digital assistants (PDAs).

                              TIP: Instead, place jewelry and other metal items in your carry-on baggage until you clear security.

                              TIP: Pack your outer coat or jacket in your baggage when possible.

                              Outer coats including trench coats, ski jackets, leather jackets, overcoats and parkas must go through the X-ray machine for inspection. If you choose to wear an outer coat to the checkpoint, you will need to either place it in your carry-on or put it in the bin that is provided for you. You will not need to remove suit jackets or blazers unless requested by the screener.
                              In an effort to try and better educate the air traveler and expedite the travel experience, the FAA has created a list of security tips for air travelers. It includes such items as what you cannot bring in carry-on luggage, as well as tips on checking in.

                              PERMITTED AND PROHIBITED ITEMS

                              Prohibited items are weapons, explosives, and incendiaries and include items that are seemingly harmless but may be used as weapons?the so-called ?dual use? items. You may not bring these items to security checkpoints without authorization.

                              If you bring a prohibited item to the checkpoint, you may be criminally and/or civilly prosecuted or, at the least, asked to rid yourself of the item. A screener and/or Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) will make this determination, depending on what the item is and the circumstances. This is because bringing a prohibited item to a security checkpoint?even accidentally?is illegal.

                              For updates and for more information, visit TSA?s website at www.TSATravelTips.us or call the Consumer Response Center toll-tree at 1-866-289-9673 or email [email protected]www.nsc.org

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