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  • SEIU: Boston Guards Do Not Make Enough

    Link: http://business.bostonherald.com/bus...ticleid=126412

    The SEIU makes several interesting statements in this article.

    1) Nearly half of all security guards are African-American.
    2) Guards should be making double, $21.00 per hour.

    I have to wonder what the average Boston Police Officer makes, base pay. If the security guards make $21.00, the Boston Police union will most likely demand double since a guard makes so much "for doing so little."

    As far as the national race profile, I have seen no indicators about this. Perhaps a study in Security Management was done, for you ASIS members who have access to SM, that I haven't found. Anyone know where SEIU is getting this data from?

    The only union that I know that is AFL-CIO affiliated and specifically working with security companies is the "U. S. Department of Homeland Security Police Officer's Assocation," which I can't seem to figure out if its a police union, a security union, or both. There are many pictures of sworn officers on the pages, no idea if they're authorized or not, and several sign offs from companies like Akal Security, etc. I bring this up because from the "securitypolice.org" site, they note:

    "As a matter of law only legitimate security union recognized by the National Labor Relations Board ( NLRB) can file a petition with the NLRB to have a security union certified as a collective bargaining agent.

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security Officers Association is prepared to help you every step of the way in forming a legitimate security officers union giving you the protection under section 159, Title 29 of U.S. Labor Code. This provision, known more commonly as the "Guard Law," gives management the right to refuse workers' petitions to join a mix guard union if these unions represent members other than guards. "

    Is the SEIU considered a legitimate security union and therefore a collective barganing agent?

    Their site design makes their message hard to read, unfortunately. As I've said before, I'd rather deal with a union composed OF security officers, not a catch all union like SEIU who most likely has no idea what the hell their members are talking about. "Safety? You don't need that, you need more money."

    Of course, I come from a state where such protections for unions are met with "right to work," and summary termination without cause, as allowed by Florida Law.
    Last edited by N. A. Corbier; 02-22-2006, 09:29 PM.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

  • #2
    Organizations like that have been pretty unsuccessful in non-union states.
    I can only imagine what would happen if they tried to rally in Texas like they did in California. We would be subject to an increase of rash and negative media reporting, we would have more hostile encounters and pissing matches with our l.e. counterparts because of the garbage their associations tell them about us, and the rate of pay would eventually and steadily decline, not increase. I do remember when I started working the average pay for security was $6.50 per hour. I could not live with such a thing again.
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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    • #3
      Originally posted by 1stWatch
      Organizations like that have been pretty unsuccessful in non-union states.
      I can only imagine what would happen if they tried to rally in Texas like they did in California. We would be subject to an increase of rash and negative media reporting, we would have more hostile encounters and pissing matches with our l.e. counterparts because of the garbage their associations tell them about us, and the rate of pay would eventually and steadily decline, not increase. I do remember when I started working the average pay for security was $6.50 per hour. I could not live with such a thing again.
      You mean the "security guards are dangerous, useless, interfering with police operations, officious, and have no business dressing like us?"

      I'd love to know when the pissing match started. What decade. Was it after the police unions started making gains in their image? I've been told there were decades when they were both equally derided as something only "incompetent foreigners" could do. Ie: the racism against Irish police in NY and other states. Have they come so far that they need to repeat what was done to them on an "upstart" industry?
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
        You mean the "security guards are dangerous, useless, interfering with police operations, officious, and have no business dressing like us?"

        I'd love to know when the pissing match started. What decade.
        It seems to be a while back. I'm not quite sure, but it does seem to have a long history. There is a section of this article titled "struggling for safety and respect". That sheds a little bit of light on it.

        http://www.assisttexas.org/art74.shtml
        "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

        Comment


        • #5
          SEIU: Boston Guards Do Not Make Enough

          What guard does?
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

          Comment


          • #6
            Seiu

            If it is not obvious, SEIU is very anti-government contractor/company. I'm not sure of the source of the statistics they post, but they are incorrect. I am an ASIS member and will attempt to gather more accurate information. SEIU hates my employer with a passion, and all bargaining unit employees make more than $21.00 hr.

            Comment


            • #7
              I'll eventually join ASIS, when I can afford their dues and a CPP. But I knew that their playing the race card so early in this seemed strange to me.

              This isn't about "the poor blackguard." This is about the supernational conglomerates reducing liability and training so that they can hire any idiot off the street, suit them up, and put them to work for low pay, reaping large profit margins at the expense of the public, the client, and the country.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #8
                My company has an office in Boston so I do have a very general idea of how Mass/Boston operates. Now Mass has no mandatory training for security officers.
                You pass a background? Cool, here?s a badge.
                You want to be an armed security officer? Great do you have a regular pistol permit? Great, here?s a badge and a holster.

                Now they do also have ?Special Police Officers? That requires some special training, 160 hours I think, that is regulated by the city. They do make much more per hour. They also are armed and have additional powers of arrest.

                So, if these people want to raise the pay of the regular security officers then the first thing they need to do is require mandatory training state regualtion to raise the bar.
                Last edited by SgtUSMC8541; 02-23-2006, 07:12 PM.
                www.oramsecurity.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Federal Regulation

                  I believe that we will see (within the next 3-5 years) the federal government stepping in and regulating the hiring and training of security personnel. The states have obviously failed (in their weak attempts) in improving the quality of personnel, and the image of our chosen profession. Every year law enforcement organizations are forced to give up their traditional duties and hand the torch to the private sector (Metro Miami, Raleigh-Durham,N.C.,etc.). This will continue due to the impact of 9/11.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sierra 1
                    I believe that we will see (within the next 3-5 years) the federal government stepping in and regulating the hiring and training of security personnel. The states have obviously failed (in their weak attempts) in improving the quality of personnel, and the image of our chosen profession. Every year law enforcement organizations are forced to give up their traditional duties and hand the torch to the private sector (Metro Miami, Raleigh-Durham,N.C.,etc.). This will continue due to the impact of 9/11.
                    I would love to see that but I don?t think it will happen. The states will fight it. Where outside of federal jobs, can the federal government dictate the hiring requirements for private companies? Perhaps only for security contracts with the federal government, and I think they already do that. Even if they do find a way to do it, I think you are going to see the same mistakes that the states have made moved to the federal government. The minimums are going to be so low as to be almost useless. The only way is to get the states to step up and do it right. Connecticut just implemented an 8 hour guard card. In 2 years it becomes 12 and in 4 more years it will be up to 16 hours.

                    What I have been doing is bringing in the IFPO's CPO cert for my better sites. When an officer earns the CPO I have it built in the contract to get them a rasie as well as a billing increase. Now this raises the level of officers. If they do not earn the CPO in the first 6 months then they get removed from the site. Over time I will have CPO's working at all my better sites.
                    www.oramsecurity.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I can see that, and will eventually require CPO for all supervisory positions Sergeant and higher. The company will provide training materials, educational support, but as a condition of employment as a supervisory manager, you will be CPO certified. If not, highest you hit is Corporal.

                      As far as "Special Police Officers," are they considered by the police brotherhood to be brothers, or are they uppity security guards taking jobs away from real police officers? I know this sounds rather a "drastic" to put it, but in the mind of many police officers, anything that looks like a cop but isn't a municipal public officer is a wannabe who the ___________ in city/state/federal government made it so they can take real police jobs away.

                      Then again, there's always the infighting about "are private college cops real cops, are blah real cops, etc..." So I think folks like Tennsix know my point on that.

                      The industry does not want, and will fight very hard against, any mandatory training on state or federal level. They will state that the legislation places undue burdens on their operations (profit), that security guards are not required to be trained to perform observation duties, and that their in-house training system is above reproach for training guards to "observe and report." They will argue that protection is the provience of public law enforcement, not a private entity, and that additional training in such topics is not suggested or needed. They will cite instances where "trained guards" create liability by engaging in protective actions which draw lawsuits.

                      Many contracts place the guard there to protect property, not people, and those guards are there specifically for the purposes of observing incidents and reporting them to the client for insurance purposes. NOT to the police or anyone else. To the client.

                      If you read the thread about mall security and the officer who was robbed in his security vehicle, you'll see several points about protection vs. observation. I was thinking about how to protect malls from weapons. According to the powers that be in our industry, the actual protection of people in those malls is up to the police, who are called to restore order. The job of the security company observing that mall is to inform people of rules violations and ask them to comply, NOT protect people.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        As far as "Special Police Officers," are they considered by the police brotherhood to be brothers, or are they uppity security guards taking jobs away from real police officers? I know this sounds rather a "drastic" to put it, but in the mind of many police officers, anything that looks like a cop but isn't a municipal public officer is a wannabe who the ___________ in city/state/federal government made it so they can take real police jobs away.
                        Not brothers but perhaps, cousins? The SP get the jobs that the ?real? Police don?t want. The Police know they get more training than the rest of the security officers (since they get none sometimes). You also find many of them are retired cops, military, and other state/federal employees.
                        www.oramsecurity.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by SgtUSMC8541
                          I would love to see that but I don?t think it will happen.
                          I agreee with Sarge on this one. I think that the most that could happen is that the Federal government will mandate that the states regulate the security industry, and leave it up to each individual state to determine how much "regulation" they will do. But I do not even think this will fly, beacuse the industry "big boys" will fight it tooth and nail.

                          Originally posted by SgtUSMC8541
                          What I have been doing is bringing in the IFPO's CPO cert for my better sites. When an officer earns the CPO I have it built in the contract to get them a rasie as well as a billing increase.
                          I think this is a great idea. It is refreshing to see a security company owner who realizes the value of proper training. And who rewards his guards for getting the training.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by histfan71

                            It is refreshing to see a security company owner who realizes the value of proper training.
                            Someday, but for now, just a Branch Manager.
                            www.oramsecurity.com

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                            • #15
                              SEIU: Wilrobnson Does Not Make Enough


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