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Security Asks Woman to Remove "Hoodie"

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    This goes back to tact. People don't already don't like being told what to do, especially if you're younger than they are, so making personalized comments toward someone while in a uniform is uncalled for, whether you feel the person deserved it or not. Simple statements like please and thank you would have gotten the results he wanted. Even adding compliments while speaking to her would have turned his seemingly rude action into something else.

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  • 1stWatch
    replied
    I find the photo of the little ole lady cringing and clutching her hood to be amusing.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard
    That explains it then. I was wondering what all the fuss was about. Here the term hoodie refers to the hooded sweatshirt and not a particular class of people. Both me and my better half have hoodies that we wear regularly and refer to them as such. We are definitely not thugs.
    I personally hate hoodies, they aren't stiff enough to keep the hood hem out of my eyes. But, there are better indicators to criminal activity than a hooded sweatshirt.

    You know, like a hooded sweatshirt with right symmetry all through the person's clothing, showing color affiliation.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
    Just an FYI, hooded sweatshirts in the UK are called "jumpers." The term "hoodie" has a negative connotation over there, unlike here.
    Girlfriend looked that up on Wikipedia. Our term "hood rat" also seems to come from hoodie.

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTFirefighter
    Just an FYI, hooded sweatshirts in the UK are called "jumpers." The term "hoodie" has a negative connotation over there, unlike here.
    That explains it then. I was wondering what all the fuss was about. Here the term hoodie refers to the hooded sweatshirt and not a particular class of people. Both me and my better half have hoodies that we wear regularly and refer to them as such. We are definitely not thugs.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by 1stWatch
    Wilshire, UK:
    A security guard at a local supermarket challenged a 58 year old teacher's assistant over a hooded coat she was wearing, referring to it as a "hoodie", a term used to describe hoodlums wearing hoods. The shop issued an apology for the incident.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/w...re/4735154.stm
    Wonder if this guy got his policies wrong, being contract, or what? I noted that BBC reported many places ban them, but not the store he was working at.

    Leave a comment:


  • 1stWatch
    started a topic Security Asks Woman to Remove "Hoodie"

    Security Asks Woman to Remove "Hoodie"

    Wilshire, UK:
    A security guard at a local supermarket challenged a 58 year old teacher's assistant over a hooded coat she was wearing, referring to it as a "hoodie", a term used to describe hoodlums wearing hoods. The shop issued an apology for the incident.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/w...re/4735154.stm

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