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  • Medical Emergency response

    I'm trying to gather some data to back a proposal I'm writing to my manager. I work at a commercial office complex for a large cooperation as a contract "EMT / Security Officer."

    We act as EMT's in the event of a medical emergency on campus or one of our leased properties. For potential life-threatening calls, we have 9-1-1 contacted for the local FD's ambulance and medic. Otherwise, we respond, make a decision with the patient on transport, and then the Command Station calls 9-1-1 for an ambulance if needed.


    Right now, we are not an "official State EMS Provider" - we have all but 50 bucks of equipment to qualify for the state "recognition" as a Quick Response service.

    The EMT is a foot patrol officer until something happens, and the EMT equipment is kept in the office. We have 2 vehicles, a patrol vehicle (that CAN'T be the EMT, because of the duties of the officer) and a Supervisor vehicle (so the Shift Supervisor can respond to assist/babysit) - if we were to assign the EMT a vehicle, we'd have to "find" a 3rd vehicle.

    Most of our sites are within a mile of our office, but we are in a LARGE corporate complex with many traffic lights, and our response time isn't as good as it would be with Red lights, a siren, and an OptiCom...

    So, In short, I'm looking for input from folks who have in-house Medical response programs, and how they are handled.

    Thanks,

    Jon
    The views expressed here are mine and do not reflect the official opinion of my employer or the organization through which the Internet was accessed.

  • #2
    It seems that your first step would be to recognized/certified as an EMS first responder or ambulance service. From a legal aspect, that would serve to legitimize your medical operation and provide professional medical services which would include emergency responses (red lights and siren). It would entail funds for equipment, training, insurance and a lot of red tape with the state.
    I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
    -Lieutenant Commander Data
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    • #3
      Jon,
      Look back through my posts and you will see that I'm doing pretty much the same job you describe. I am contracted as an EMT/Security Officer and am assigned to a post in the industrial environment. I've worked at a chemical plant but currently work at a Steel Mill. The mill has a medical department that is staffed weekdays by a RN who sees new hires and conducts physicals and approves/clears employees who have been on medical leave to return to work. She will also treat minor injuries in the clinic on site or refer the patient to the company Doctor at a facility in town. The Contract EMTs respond to emergencies in the plant and transport employees to the clinic, the company doctor or the local ER as needed in a company "Medical Van". When the nurse is off duty the EMTs are the primary responders. We will often meet patients at the clinic requesting medicines for minor illnesses, rebandage burns or cuts from previous injuries or even conduct drug screens (piss tests) of employees involved in accidents which caused damage or injury. We operate under written protocals which detail our scope of practice and treatments we are authorized to do. The plant doctor is medical director and is responsible for overseeing the medical operations of the plant. We operate under his direction. If an employee is injured the EMT/Security Officer will go to the patient and begin treatment, contact the on call company doctor and either transport the patient in the company medical van or, if the patient requires ALS intervention, the local EMS service will be requested via 911. We don't run "Lights and Siren" in our copmany van. If the patient is in that bad of shape we call 911 and have the local ambulance service respond to the facility and transport for us.
      Our BLS bag includes O2, AED, splinting and bandaging gear, BSI and other basic gear. The Medical van has a folding litter and a long spine board . EMT/Security officers provide their own BP cuff and Stethoscope.
      We are not an Ambulance Service but provide EMT-Basic level care per a contract the plant has with it's Union employees. Additionally, the plant has trained about 12 emplyees who work in different departments on different shifts as medical First Responders. These employees, when needed, can assist the patient until the EMT/SO arrives and then help the EMT should it be necessary.
      When the EMT's are not performing medical duties they are assigned to the front gate Guard house and assist the regualr security officer in watching monitors, signing in visitors and answering phones and other routine duties.
      All EMT/SOs are Nationally Registered EMT-Bs and also hold State Certifications. The EMTs I all work with have years of experiance in the Fire Service or with an Ambulance service.
      Good luck with your service.

      Steve
      Attached Files
      Last edited by EMTGuard; 02-18-2006, 09:23 AM.
      Hospital Security Officer

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      • #4
        Originally posted by EMTjon
        I'm trying to gather some data to back a proposal I'm writing to my manager. I work at a commercial office complex for a large cooperation as a contract "EMT / Security Officer."

        We act as EMT's in the event of a medical emergency on campus or one of our leased properties. For potential life-threatening calls, we have 9-1-1 contacted for the local FD's ambulance and medic. Otherwise, we respond, make a decision with the patient on transport, and then the Command Station calls 9-1-1 for an ambulance if needed.


        Right now, we are not an "official State EMS Provider" - we have all but 50 bucks of equipment to qualify for the state "recognition" as a Quick Response service.

        The EMT is a foot patrol officer until something happens, and the EMT equipment is kept in the office. We have 2 vehicles, a patrol vehicle (that CAN'T be the EMT, because of the duties of the officer) and a Supervisor vehicle (so the Shift Supervisor can respond to assist/babysit) - if we were to assign the EMT a vehicle, we'd have to "find" a 3rd vehicle.

        Most of our sites are within a mile of our office, but we are in a LARGE corporate complex with many traffic lights, and our response time isn't as good as it would be with Red lights, a siren, and an OptiCom...

        So, In short, I'm looking for input from folks who have in-house Medical response programs, and how they are handled.

        Thanks,

        Jon
        Possibly look into an emergency responder from the american red cross and you really do not have to worry about the state. But it is not to hard to get a qrs service. It all depends on the county if the cad system would have extra numbers to give out. What county are you in? If needed I know of a fire company that may have some extra equipment that I may get for you, Thats if you are interested. I am not sure if you already got the list of what is needed from the state?

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        • #5
          Equipment wise - I have about everything I need (need a set of padded board splints and helmet, goggles and gloves). I, too am somewhat concerned about the liability of an "unofficial" service. We don't currently respond with red lights/sirens. I'd like to see us with an ability to respond "emergency" - we are in a built-up coprate area with too many traffic lights.

          As far as I can tell, there is no requirement to certify as a Quick Response service in PA - it is a "Voluntary Recognicion Program" - not required.

          Anyway, I'll probably have a "first proposal" put in this week, and will go from there. I want to have some backing from my company to go "tell my story" to the local FD's and County EMS office - I'd like to have "official" permission before saying Who/Where I am to the County folks, and I can't get an answer without doing that.

          Thanks.
          The views expressed here are mine and do not reflect the official opinion of my employer or the organization through which the Internet was accessed.

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          • #6
            Here at Boeing we respond red lights and sirens. We also have our own fire dept with ambulance and fire engines and our own hospitial. Our firefighters are all EMTs per WA state requirement and they handle all our medical emergencies. As security we are trained to provide first aid/CPR/AED and to respond to medical calls if we want or to escort city fire in if its serious enough. I will usually respond to medical calls lights and sirens with the fd to assist them with crowd control and to protect their equipment from theft or damage. My advice is too some research, several large corporations use their own private fire/ems depts and then make a profesional report based on findings. Include details such as pros/cons and estimated costs, additional equipment, etc. Present this to the person in charge and show that there is a real need for this. Since you are wanting red lights and sirens, include the law (yes I know your private property but you may need to use them on public roads) costs of training (CEVO I or II, or EVOC) and a letter of authorization from your highway patrol and local police dept. Private property anything pretty much goes but it is better to be safe than sorry and if your employer see that the law and local pd is agreeing with you then they might side with you.

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