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  • navyleo
    replied
    UPDATE...

    I've brought the issue to the attention to my shift supervisor and he said that he's perfectly aware of the consequences as far as DHS is concerned...but it's just a matter of getting that messege through to the agency.

    Our shift and most other officers at the site have our own style of working and we all know the current polices and contact numbers, i'm just looking at it for the benefit of future officers sake. Like I said in the original post, i'm fairly new at it and i'm slowly getting the swing of things around the site. I know how hard it was for me to know the manuals for test purposes and also know how things are done in reality.

    I am a firm believer that when S**T ****s the fan...the books go out the window and you do what you think is right! But at the same time, its equally important to have a firm foundation on where to start and when to make the judgment call on what is right.

    Thanks everybody for your responses. I just wanted to see what you all had to say on the matter!

    Leave a comment:


  • CAPTAIN KOOLAID
    replied
    Emergency Plan

    If it been said sorry but our emergency plan. When **** hits the fan it's either every man for himself or put head in between legs and kiss your butt goodbye.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    You will also find sites with ambiguous generic SOPs that could apply to any site, often in this environment the SOs implement their own "standard practice" based on experience & common sense... though a non-uniform/planned/structured approach is not a good idea IMHO

    EDIT: - towards original topic of emergency plan details

    It would be prudent in a CYA fashion to locate the correct contact details via a phone book (both internal & external) and by what other means necessary to update the emergency contact details just in case the SHTF!
    Last edited by Maelstrom; 03-15-2008, 07:12 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Dregs .......... and the wannabe's who are still sitting on the lowest rung possible.

    Nothing pees me off more than people who say "what you need to do is this ............... or else this will happen". I had a crew who started doing this to me and after week 2 I told them, stop telling me what I HAVE to do and start giving me solutions to problems. It was the first time that 90% of them had ever been given a voice and not treated like dirt.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    There's a big thing in Contract Security that isn't in Integration. Whereas an installer/tech is actually supposed to know something, and therefore seen as knowlegable, in most cases the guards are supposed to - in this order:

    1. Show up on time.
    2. Say nothing to the client.
    3. Do not sleep in front of the client.
    4. Hit their keys.
    5. Do not bring anything that might be bad to anyone's attention.
    6. Get the hell off post when your tour is up.

    The employees know nothing, so what they say is in one ear and out the other, because the managers are used to the dregs of the Earth trying to tell them how to do their job.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    That's why I added the "one would think" to the end of my post. But I've never had a boss tell me 'no' when I said 'hey, here's an idea to make a little more money'.

    It's all in how you say it.
    If only it was that simple.

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
    Maybe; maybe not. Those who are new to the security field should use discernment in determining whether such input is wanted or desired. Time and time again I have seen management prefer the stick your head in the sand approach and even seek to have proactive officers removed from the site. Don't think it can't happen - it did to me.

    Base your response on the site supervisor's reaction. If he pooh-poohs your observation, chances are you are at such a site.

    That's why I added the "one would think" to the end of my post. But I've never had a boss tell me 'no' when I said 'hey, here's an idea to make a little more money'.

    It's all in how you say it.

    Leave a comment:


  • gixxer32404
    replied
    I've seen companies w/no post orders but then they $8.00/hour or less for armed security.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingsman
    replied
    Most of ours are up to date, but we were a little startled a few weeks ago when we had an alarm go off and had an alarm company call we had not heard of. Seems the alarm company had changed a year ago and no one notified us.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by CameraMan View Post
    Also, your bosses will like the fact that you are looking to improve security at your site.....
    Maybe; maybe not. Those who are new to the security field should use discernment in determining whether such input is wanted or desired. Time and time again I have seen management prefer the stick your head in the sand approach and even seek to have proactive officers removed from the site. Don't think it can't happen - it did to me.

    Base your response on the site supervisor's reaction. If he pooh-poohs your observation, chances are you are at such a site.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Most of them you will find are outdated with wrong contact people, wrong contact information and may even have your EMS people in the wrong positions now. Interesting to note how many staff know where to go for an evacuation or what to do during a bomb threat or something else ?

    Even contractors / visitors need to be made aware of anything of this nature and quite often it is assumed. Best example would be conference visitors or hotel guests who never take note of a fire exit until the alarms sound. In this firm, I found our EMS Plan was last updated in 1999 so had a busy 12 months to review EVERY location.

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    Also, your bosses will like the fact that you are looking to improve security at your site, and have possibly spotted a chance for your company to earn consultancy fees if the client needs assistance preparing a new plan.

    One would think.

    Leave a comment:


  • navyleo
    replied
    Thanks for your replies. Now that I think about, the security staff's overall "lack of confidence" can most likely be linked to the outdated emergency plan thus resulting in a lack of respect for the client management.
    I will surely bring it up to my site supervisor to see if anything is in the works.

    Thanks again!

    Leave a comment:


  • Silva Consultants
    replied
    What you are describing is, unfortunately, much more common than it should be. When I conduct a security assessment, I often find that the Post Orders as well as the Emergency Plan used by the security staff are hopelessly out of date. Interestingly, I find that if documentation such as this is complete and current, then the overall security operation is probably pretty squared away also. Conversely, if the written documentation is bad, then other aspects of the security program are probably lacking as well.

    In some cases, problems of this type can be attributed to the lack of qualified security/safety manager on the client's staff. Often the security function is delegated to a facilities or engineering manager who is hopelessly overworked and knows little or nothing about safety or security.

    Another possibility is that a current plan does exist but it has simply not made its way into the hands of the security staff. Sometimes, there is a total disconnect between the people who prepare the plans and submit them to the regulatory agencies for approval and the people who actually need to use the plan (the security staff). If you look around, you may find a stack of shiny binders sitting on a shelf somewhere.

    If I were in your shoes, I would first point out the deficiencies to the management of your company (the contract security company). Depending on what the contract between your company and the client specifies, it may or may not be your company's responsibility to provide an updated plan.

    If it is the client's responsibility to provide the plan, then your company should politely notify the client that the current plan is obsolete and ask if a more current one is available. If a more current plan does not exist, then your company should offer assistance in making the necessary updates (for a fee), or refer them to an outside consultant. This notification should be made in writing, and repeated at periodic intervals if the client fails to update the plan.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Because you're working in "critical infrastructure," its up to the Facility Security Officer for the facility to prepare, implement, assess, and report the Facility Emergency Response Plan to God knows how many people.

    Now days, its less lawsuit and more DHS going after someone.

    Leave a comment:

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