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  • Security Stops Murder Suspect From Fleeing

    Houston, TX:
    An armed security officer at the Villa Monterrey apartments on Concourse Dr in Houston, TX detained a shooting suspect at gunpoint until police arrived. The officer received a commendation from a police homicide detective in the newspaper article regarding the story.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/kprc/20060216/lo_kprc/3272232
    "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

  • #2
    "He seems to have been doing his job. He certainly was alert, conscientious enough to at least go and investigate," HPD Homicide Detective Sgt. Flores told KPRC Local 2.

    The question, of course, is was his job to intervene, or was it to protect?

    I bring this up not lightly, this guard may be out of a job depending on his employer's ideal of "security."
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

    Comment


    • #3
      That is always the issue is it not. Act out of wanting to help because you have the nature to due so. Or not help because it's not your job by SOP. One's good intentions is another lawyers feeding frenzy.
      My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

      -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

      -It's just a job kid deal with it

      -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

      Comment


      • #4
        My fellow officers and I are always involved in situations where what we do is always under scrutiny. I know this does not match up to stopping a murder suspect, but one night a fellow officer and I had to deal with two individuals who were throwing hot coffee at custodial employees. We went after the two into the parking ramp. They were a floor above where we came into the ramp. The observation booth officer said that the two individuals where urinating all over a vehicle that they were parked next to. When the two came down the ramp in their vehicle I stopped them and told them to park the car. We spoke with them and then brought them back into the building where they were later cited for disorderly conduct.

        The big issue was it was not safe for me to stop them in the vehicle on the way down the ramp. As far as I was concerned, the ramp is still our jurisdiction and I had the right to stop them. My sergeant told me that I had to leave that part out of my report because the Leutenants would be all over me for stopping a vehicle in the ramp. I feel that what I did wouldn't be any different than if I would have stopped them before they made it into the ramp. The risk factor isn't any different whether they are in a car or not. A weapon can be concealed anywhere.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by michael.c.bell
          The risk factor isn't any different whether they are in a car or not. A weapon can be concealed anywhere.
          Michael, were you on foot or in a patrol vehicle when you stopped these suspects. Did you forget that the car itself can be a weapon?

          Comment


          • #6
            I'm wondering who cited the offenders for disorderly conduct, and if it was a police officer, how they were cited for a misdemeanor count without the officer personally witnessing the offense?

            In other words: Security in this state can do misdemeanor citations? If so, how? Specifically how.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
              "He seems to have been doing his job. He certainly was alert, conscientious enough to at least go and investigate," HPD Homicide Detective Sgt. Flores told KPRC Local 2.

              The question, of course, is was his job to intervene, or was it to protect?

              I bring this up not lightly, this guard may be out of a job depending on his employer's ideal of "security."
              The big answer is he was there to protect. This was not one of those "observe and report" jobs. In a position like that he is expected to intervene if possible. This kind of thing is common in Houston and in Dallas.
              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                I'm wondering who cited the offenders for disorderly conduct, and if it was a police officer, how they were cited for a misdemeanor count without the officer personally witnessing the offense?

                In other words: Security in this state can do misdemeanor citations? If so, how? Specifically how.
                In WA state, I dont think officers need to see an offense to cite for it. I had an officer make a DUI arrest using a witness statement of mine.
                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                "The Curve" 1998

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Echos13
                  That is always the issue is it not. Act out of wanting to help because you have the nature to due so. Or not help because it's not your job by SOP. One's good intentions is another lawyers feeding frenzy.
                  I've found that with WBS companies, their approval or condemnation all depends on how the situation ends. If it ends well for all with plenty of favorable press for the security company, then all is well and you are a hero to be written about in their next newsletter. If it goes poorly, you're likely to be standing all by yourself in the unemployment line and/or with a public defender when you are arraigned on charges. They love the limelight when all is well, but otherwise expect a "court martial."
                  Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
                    In WA state, I dont think officers need to see an offense to cite for it. I had an officer make a DUI arrest using a witness statement of mine.
                    Heh. WI law requires a public peace officer to have first hand knowledge of any misdemeanor offense, or else they must seek warrant from a competent magistrate for the offense. There are exceptions such as DUI and some traffic offenses, however, those are written directly into the code.
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security
                      I've found that with WBS companies, their approval or condemnation all depends on how the situation ends. If it ends well for all with plenty of favorable press for the security company, then all is well and you are a hero to be written about in their next newsletter. If it goes poorly, you're likely to be standing all by yourself in the unemployment line and/or with a public defender when you are arraigned on charges. They love the limelight when all is well, but otherwise expect a "court martial."
                      That is how many security companies operate. One company I worked for, in a supervisor capacity at that, had a policy that said you would be terminated if you drew your weapon for any reason. That was not enforced on some individuals since they received favorable media attention for saving life while using deadly force.
                      It was also not enforced on some others because they figured out pretty quick who was knowledgeable enough about the law and come back with a lawsuit against the company for wrongful termination after the force they used was deemed lawful by the court. There have been several security officers who have successfully sued and won damages after being terminated under such circumstances.

                      Not all companies follow this train of thought, however. One other company I worked for that specialized in working patrol at apartment complexes was very proactive in dealing with problems and did not have a problem with officers being aggressive, as long as the approach or force used was legal. In fact, you could be fired for poor performance in some cases for not making an arrest.
                      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would like to work for that company!
                        "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                        "The Curve" 1998

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Wackenhut Lawson
                          I would like to work for that company!
                          I wanted to work for that company too, when I got hired. Now I would never do so again since their business side is poorly run. After a while action gets old anyway. It all becomes more of the same after you've seen a certain number of incidents happen. It also loses its luster when the paychecks stop coming in.
                          "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 1stWatch
                            I wanted to work for that company too, when I got hired. Now I would never do so again since their business side is poorly run. After a while action gets old anyway. It all becomes more of the same after you've seen a certain number of incidents happen. It also loses its luster when the paychecks stop coming in.
                            Dear Employer,
                            We have, as your employees, decided that until you start paying us again, we are forced to work as our underpaid brothers do. We will observe what goes on, report it to the client, and take no action. When you feel like paying us, we'll feel like making arrests.
                            Some Kind of Commando Leader

                            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                              Dear Employer,
                              We have, as your employees, decided that until you start paying us again, we are forced to work as our underpaid brothers do. We will observe what goes on, report it to the client, and take no action. When you feel like paying us, we'll feel like making arrests.
                              This particular employer lost 80% of its employees at a time on several occasions. Around five years ago, this was not the case. They were absolutely the most professional security organization I had seen at that time and they had a great reputation, had great achievements, and had a lot of staffing, such that they could respond to most calls in less than five minutes.

                              Now, since the face of the real estate business has changed and the company was not, how shall I say, adapting its ways to meet its business needs, it lost a lot of business. Imagine losing eight accounts in one day. They do gain business very proactively, though, so they do well enough to stay around. Last I heard they are only using one or two patrol officers per shift.
                              "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                              Comment

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