Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What makes a good supervisor/leader?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LPAjh9558
    replied
    Amen....

    Leave a comment:


  • grenadier
    replied
    what makes a good supervisor/leader

    Know Be Do .
    Know what is required of you, your customers, your employer, your employees. Be there for your Boss be there for your Peers, be there for your subordinates(right or wrong Just be there)when called upon. Do the right thing (again right or wrong) do the right thing for all concerned in each and every situation, Do not hesitate to praise, criticize, correct, counsel, Do Not be affraid, be aware, be alert, be positive!!, be compassionate, be firm, be fair, be stratigiecally, tactically and technically correct.
    Last edited by grenadier; 03-24-2008, 06:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPAjh9558
    replied
    it helps...

    It does make your staff feel better when they're appreciated more and not talked "down" to. Unfortunately, my last 2 managers where I worked recently lacked in several areas. THEY COULD'VE LEARNED A LOT FROM FROM THIS FORUM

    My 1st LPM had his moments to say the least and we were lucky to even get thank you's or good job, way to go's from him. Instead we got lots of verbal abuse from him and if you didn't tell him off, he just kept on doing it

    My 2nd LPM did better in the beginning but then started sliding. He was fun to talk with, would tell jokes etc. But for whatever the reasons, when you wanted to learn from someone with 19+ years in the business, he wanted no part of it...and became an instant a**hole

    This was 1 job where I've never regreted working with 2 people more in my life.....fargin bastages
    Last edited by LPAjh9558; 03-24-2008, 01:24 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • inman
    replied
    Originally posted by FederalSecurity View Post
    Hey inman, I think I need you to apply for a supervisory job at the Bureau...
    Some think I am overqualified for my present employer with all the certificates of training that I have. I will take all the training that I can get, and give all that they request of me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ewfr 'Gomulee
    replied
    Originally posted by JB diligence View Post
    I am interested in what all have to say, if you are a front line officer, supervisor FTO or even management, let's hear it!

    What qualities should a "good" supervisor/leader possess that would both be good for employees as well as the client?

    I'll begin by saying a few (of many) things that I think a good supervisor/leader should; Be one who leads by example, never gives an order that they would not follow or do themselves, is approachable to all employees who will listen and consider their ideas/problems. A good supervisor/leader acts in the best interests of both the client as well as their employees.

    What are your thoughts, what would YOU want as a supervisor/leader?
    The person should be:
    Honest
    Fair but also tough
    and most importantly... should have bucket loads of Common Sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • FederalSecurity
    replied
    Bullseye...

    Hey inman, I think I need you to apply for a supervisory job at the Bureau...

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Thanks LPA - and I agree with you about showing respect to those with whom you work with. A bit of interest in their family or hobbies goes a long way as it shows you are human and if you hear of a sick child or spouse, you are aware they may not be in the following day.


    Another good example was my w/end work every month with 1 retailer. I would always shout (pay) my team coffee and muffins together with the contract S/O's because it was a sign of saying thank you and the $20.00 a month was like 2 lunches during the week. I still do it every Monday with my 2 concierge staff whomever is on duty as I audit their records and we discuss work issues whilst I get time away from the Monday Mayhem of emails. From April, we are to be given coffee vouchers as an incentive with front line staff to get $20 - 50 a month and management to get up to $200.00 which is about 50 cups a month.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPAjh9558
    replied
    Originally posted by inman View Post
    People will not care how much you know, till they know how much you care.
    Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
    A good leader is someone who gets the job done without arrogance or makes demands from someone who is unable to commit. I have had times when the stripes come out of the box and severe buttocks kicking needs to happen to bring things back on track again. A good leader also stands up for their staff and whilst not being best mates, will be there to lend a hand or discuss issues affecting their personal life such as family illness, relationship issues (even just to listen or give them privacy to make calls at work) and above all know that what you give out comes back in loyalty 10 fold in the future.

    Lastly, we all make mistakes but it is how well you learn from that mistake and recover to ensure the incident is repaired as best as possible - ensuring that the same mistake is not made again.
    I have to say that this is one of the more "interesting" threads that I keep an eye on...and I really do agree with a lot of what I've read here I do have to say that inman's post was excellent to read and I did learn from it as well. Thanks for the post inman

    I agree with NRM_Oz also. I think that alot of what makes a good leader applies to what's been mentioned here...but should also include the ability to show respect to the people that you supervise, and to those that you just have to be around while at work. I've found in the past that you'll get more out of the people that you work with if you just let them know that they're appreciated for what they're doing And it also doesn't hurt to make them feel like that they can be a "leader" to just by their actions...promote positive self attitude
    Last edited by LPAjh9558; 03-03-2008, 12:51 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Security
    replied
    EDIT- Posting deleted.
    Last edited by Security; 03-02-2008, 01:57 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    There are both official and unofficial sources of power in any organization. Official power is invested in a person's title and position in the organization, and is granted by decree. Official power flows downward from levels above.

    Unofficial power is accrued by people working in the organization at any level and is chiefly a matter of influence. Unofficial power flows in all directions - up, down and sideways (peers). Usually, it follows unofficial lines of communication between people at different levels, because influence requires communication. If you want to develop influence, then start by developing unofficial lines of communication in all directions around you. This must sometimes be done with circumspection and diplomacy.

    Unfortunately, our discussion so far has conflated the terms "supervisor" and "leader", and so we are seeing definitions of supervision that involve leadership, and vice versa. These are not in any way the same thing. One is an official title carrying official corporate power, bestowed from above by decree. The other is an unofficial title that can only be granted by followers in the form of their assent and loyalty.

    One can actually be a competent supervisor or middle manager and yet not be a leader. Since we all want to work for leaders (remember, those who have earned our loyalty), it is natural that when we talk about "good management", or "good supervision", we include leadership traits. Or, we include what are actually management skills in our list of leadership traits. Either way, we mix them up together.

    In fact, there are many supervisory/management positions that are structured in such a way that they give very little scope for leadership in its proper sense.

    Certainly, a good supervisor will possess traits such as "fairness", "honesty", "decisiveness", "team-building" and "competence", but these are not leadership traits. They are merely the traits of a good supervisor.

    Leadership implies all the traits noted above, but is further distinguished from "supervision" (even "good" supervision) by the presence of other traits:

    1. Vision - sometimes called "mission".

    2. Passion for the vision.

    3. Ability to persuade (as opposed to "command") others of the value of the vision. Here, "persuade" means the ability to communicate the vision in such a way as to achieve enthusiastic agreement from those who follow. This is sometimes called "buy-in". People follow a leader because they are persuaded in their minds that they want to do so, willingly and even self-sacrificially. They "believe in him/her". Intelligent people must be persuaded before they will believe and demand to know why they should believe. A leader can tell them why.

    4. Intelligence to know what things really mean, instead of merely what they appear to be.

    5. The ability to assess adverse events that impact the vision negatively and find the way through, over, under or around them.

    6. The ability to recognize unanticipated opportunities and take advantage of them.

    Various leadership "lists" suggest other traits, of course, but these are the ones that I believe are essential.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-02-2008, 11:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Inman it was a pleasure to read your posts and Hotel-Sec summed it up when you need to lead by example. Yes I am at the top of the pyramid and was placed in an executive position with 1 retailer (big bloody deal I said to myself). I arrested, I got my hands dirty destroying shrinkage, I got my hands dirty looking for lost kids and even manning the staff door / parcel pick up area to relieve the uniform staff. I have a security licence and I am able to do all those things I did many years ago as a younger lad because not being a realist you LOSE reality and the ability to KNOW what your people are doing.

    So I made it to the top of the pyramid - big deal I say again !!. I still arrest scum in high heels (some men too) and man the concierge desk if we have issues or shortages. In my previous paragraph, I achieved good results with that crew because I was the boss but I was also the one who worked alongside them and it all comes from my beginnings from working my way up the ladder dealing with idiots, clients who expect more and jealousy amongst the ranks when promotions were issued and they were not considered.

    A good leader is someone who gets the job done without arrogance or makes demands from someone who is unable to commit. I have had times when the stripes come out of the box and severe buttocks kicking needs to happen to bring things back on track again. A good leader also stands up for their staff and whilst not being best mates, will be there to lend a hand or discuss issues affecting their personal life such as family illness, relationship issues (even just to listen or give them privacy to make calls at work) and above all know that what you give out comes back in loyalty 10 fold in the future.

    Lastly, we all make mistakes but it is how well you learn from that mistake and recover to ensure the incident is repaired as best as possible - ensuring that the same mistake is not made again.

    Leave a comment:


  • JB diligence
    replied
    Originally posted by inman View Post
    People will not care how much you know, till they know how much you care.
    Inman, you made some EXCELENT points! I thank you for contributing so much, what you wrote is very similar to how I personnaly feel, and I also picked up some new ones too.

    Thank you.

    JB

    Leave a comment:


  • inman
    replied
    People will not care how much you know, till they know how much you care.

    Leave a comment:


  • Security Leader
    replied
    People do not follow you because of your position; they follow you because of the way that you make them feel.

    Leave a comment:


  • inman
    replied
    Attitude and Productivity
    Nothing will improve relationships with those you supervise more than a
    consistently positive attitude on your part. Your attitude sets the pace and the
    tone for your team. If you are late to work, it will be reflected in the attitudes
    of your officers. If you complain about work conditions, it will impact in a
    negative way on their attitudes. Everything you do and every position you
    take will be reflected in the attitudes of your officers. Two expressions are
    appropriate. They are:
    1. Attitudes are caught, not taught!
    2. Your attitude speaks so loudly, others can’t hear what you say.
    There is a direct relationship between your attitude and the productivity of
    those you supervise. When you are upbeat, your officers will respond in
    positive ways that will enhance productivity. When you are negative, a drop
    in productivity can be expected.

    The Best and Worst Supervisors
    It has been said that when you become a supervisor you stop doing “real
    work.” That is because now you rely on others to do the front-line security
    work. Management is the process of getting people to do things. It’s an
    influencing and thinking function. Almost everybody has a story of the
    worst supervisor they ever knew. People can also give you an example of
    the best supervisor they knew or worked for. Not surprisingly, there are
    distinct differences. Usually it’s easy to spot a poor supervisor or an
    excellent one.
    Key Assumptions
    1. We know a poor or excellent Supervisor when we see one.
    2. We know a poor or excellent Supervisor by our experiences with one.
    3. We know poor or excellent Supervisors by what they do or don’t do.
    4. Excellent supervisors are made, not born.
    5. We can learn to do what the best supervisors do.

    The Supervisory Challenge
    Supervision is a special challenge that can help you reach new career and
    lifestyle goals. But becoming a successful PGS supervisor is not as easy as
    some people imagine. Three factors will require that you be a different kind
    of person on the job:
    1. You will be expected to lead where in the past you may have been a peer
    member of the team. This means your officers will be watching your
    actions in the hope that you will make quick and good decisions that will
    lead them in the direction that is best for the company.
    2. Your role will put you in the position of being a buffer between your
    superiors and those you supervise. This means you must satisfy your
    superiors and, at the same time, keep your officers happy so they will
    maintain high productivity. At times this may mean it is best for you to
    absorb pressure from above rather than pass it on to your officers.
    3. You will need to communicate the company's mission. You will be setting
    standards rather than living up to those set by others. This means you will
    be responsible for creating a disciplined environment where officers do not
    violate company standards or those set by you. When violations occur,
    some sensitive coaching and counseling on your part may be necessary.

    Your Role as a Supervisor
    Two truths stand out regarding the role of a supervisor:
    The work is different
    The responsibilities are greater
    The following list summarizes generally agreed-upon duties of a first-line
    supervisor. Compare your activities with this list. Are you overlooking
    something?
    Assign and distribute work.
    You must set priorities on what will get done,
    organize the work into reasonable assignments and then match those
    assignments to officers on your team.

    Monitor and control performance.
    In order to ensure quality work is being
    done through safe and legal work practices, you must get out and see what is
    going on.

    Review and evaluate performance.
    You must decide who will be
    recommended for promotion, who will be recommended for a pay increase,
    who needs coaching and counseling and who may have to be laid off or let go.

    Train and develop officers.
    Your experience is a valuable resource to your
    team. Use problems and unusual situations as training and development
    opportunities. Also see that all officers on your team are properly trained on
    the job.

    Lead your unit.
    Leadership is demonstrated in the decisions you make, the
    people you hire and train, the discipline you maintain and the example you
    present to your team.

    Communicate.
    Let your officers know what is to be done as well as policies
    and decisions that affect them. Notify your Manager of any problems you
    expect. Advise other groups of your needs and things your team does that may
    affect them.

    Handle administrative duties.
    Keep paper work and records up-to-date. Your
    job will be much easier if the information you want is current and readily
    available.

    Provide reinforcement.
    Officers like to know how they are doing. Take a few
    minutes every now and then to let your people know you appreciate their

    dependability and the contribution they are making. Many capable officers
    resign because superiors take them for granted.

    The Responsibilities of Supervision
    Responsibility to management.
    You are now a member of the management
    team. Therefore, you are expected to support management and do all you can
    to see that the goals of management are realized.

    Responsibility to your unit.
    You represent management to your team, and
    therefore are expected to treat each individual fairly.

    Responsibility to yourself.
    You have a responsibility to yourself to recognize
    your own limitations. In accepting the position of supervisor, you accept the
    responsibilities that go with the position. These will be challenging at first. If
    they continue to be overwhelming, consider that supervision is not for
    everyone. Your satisfaction and talent may lie in the front-line work, not in the
    managing of others.


    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X