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  • grenadier
    replied
    What's your title

    It Say right on the badge "Security Enforcement Officer" Customers call me sir, clients call me mister Xxxxx, subordinates call me boss or chief, Superiors call me too much to mention here, and tha bad guys call me crazySOB

    Leave a comment:


  • darkenna
    replied
    Thanks, Justice_Hound.

    Just trying to point out that the tough-guy or "Roadhouse" bouncer is a thing of the past in most urban & suburban areas, and rapidly becoming a rare thing even in rural areas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Justice_Hound
    replied
    Originally posted by darkenna View Post
    Hey... what's wrong with being a bouncer? Is that not security, by your own definition, if done correctly?
    • risk assessment Yes! A good bar/club bouncer or security agent needs to be able to read people and situations. Stopping fights before they start and cutting people off before they get so drunk they get sick are essential skills; you can't do that if you are unable to assess the situation. Not to mention fire codes, capacity levels, safety hazards, liability concerns...
    • terrorism A large club can easily hold between 350 and 700 people... some are even larger. If a certain group of racial/religious/socio/economic/nationals are the regular patrons, would that not make this a target-rich environment for the opposing group? Not all terrorism involves Islamic militants and extremists.
    • physical security Secure the building. Protect the assets. Protect the patrons. Keep everyone safe. I miss anything?
    • countermeasures Alarms, cameras, ID-checks, metal detectors, riot-control & prevention techniques, pat down techniques, crisis situation training, first-aid training, verbal judo...
    • officer safety I have been injured more often bouncing in clubs and bars (7 times) than I have busting shoplifters in a series of high-risk retail locations in drug filled, gang-prevalent, violent communities (0 times). The last of my latest round of stitches fell out yesterday, in fact. There were guns involved in that particular altercation. I have seen more guns and knives working in bars than in my day job. Safety is a HUGE issue.
    • medical First-aid training, alcohol poisoning response, how to recognize a physiological condition not caused by excessive alcohol... gotta know it.
    • working knowledge of law Need to know about civil torts and liabilities, criminal law concerning assaults and use of force, and alcohol control statutes. Not knowing--and following to the letter--the laws concerning alcohol will (not may, will) get you in serious trouble, including arrested and/or fines ranging from $25 to $25,000. Liquor commission agents are some of the most meticulous (and arrogant... they believe every one of you is doing something wrong, and they are damn well gonna find it!) investigators I have ever had the dubious pleasure of working with.
    I am the Chief of Security at a nightclub, and a bouncer. It's not as easy as it looks. (Tho it can be as fun! )
    Darkenna,

    I liked reading a post from someone who takes their job in nightclub security seriously. I feel that it is a legitimate security profession and so does the organizations who offer "Certified Public Events Officer" training.

    As an LEO a couple of the best private officers I dealt with were bouncers. Some of those places could get really rough, especially when they were packed with "GI" types from the local base. Those boys know how to fight, that's for sure .

    Justice_Hound
    LP Manager

    Leave a comment:


  • darkenna
    replied
    Originally posted by ESI AGENT View Post
    They are usually a night watchman wheather armed/unarmed or a bouncer that wears a uniform and may be armed/unarmed.
    Hey... what's wrong with being a bouncer? Is that not security, by your own definition, if done correctly?
    • risk assessment Yes! A good bar/club bouncer or security agent needs to be able to read people and situations. Stopping fights before they start and cutting people off before they get so drunk they get sick are essential skills; you can't do that if you are unable to assess the situation. Not to mention fire codes, capacity levels, safety hazards, liability concerns...
    • terrorism A large club can easily hold between 350 and 700 people... some are even larger. If a certain group of racial/religious/socio/economic/nationals are the regular patrons, would that not make this a target-rich environment for the opposing group? Not all terrorism involves Islamic militants and extremists.
    • physical security Secure the building. Protect the assets. Protect the patrons. Keep everyone safe. I miss anything?
    • countermeasures Alarms, cameras, ID-checks, metal detectors, riot-control & prevention techniques, pat down techniques, crisis situation training, first-aid training, verbal judo...
    • officer safety I have been injured more often bouncing in clubs and bars (7 times) than I have busting shoplifters in a series of high-risk retail locations in drug filled, gang-prevalent, violent communities (0 times). The last of my latest round of stitches fell out yesterday, in fact. There were guns involved in that particular altercation. I have seen more guns and knives working in bars than in my day job. Safety is a HUGE issue.
    • medical First-aid training, alcohol poisoning response, how to recognize a physiological condition not caused by excessive alcohol... gotta know it.
    • working knowledge of law Need to know about civil torts and liabilities, criminal law concerning assaults and use of force, and alcohol control statutes. Not knowing--and following to the letter--the laws concerning alcohol will (not may, will) get you in serious trouble, including arrested and/or fines ranging from $25 to $25,000. Liquor commission agents are some of the most meticulous (and arrogant... they believe every one of you is doing something wrong, and they are damn well gonna find it!) investigators I have ever had the dubious pleasure of working with.
    I am the Chief of Security at a nightclub, and a bouncer. It's not as easy as it looks. (Tho it can be as fun! )

    Leave a comment:


  • ESI AGENT
    replied
    When considering your title and the public you must understand most people who work in the So called security industry know nothing about security. They are usually a night watchman wheather armed/unarmed or a bouncer that wears a uniform and may be armed/unarmed. Rather than the guard companies calling themselves security they should be called a Guard service.That is in the business of assinging bodies on a post. When I think of security I think of someone who actually know not pretends to know about doing a risk assesment,terrorism, physical security, countermeasures, as well as the standard officer safety,medical,working knowlege of law. The sad thing is if your motivated and educated your in the wrong industry. Guard companies care about billing that's it.As long as the client lets you work the post and you get no complaints the company is happy. Their are some good security companies out there but they are in the very small majority. I consider myself an armed Professional or security agent depending on what IM doing. However the average person who knows nothing about security will just see me as a Security Guard regardless of education or training because they don't know anything about the industry and see the lower end of the industry.

    Leave a comment:


  • theconstipated1
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
    You don't by chance ask potential hires if they can spell guard do you?
    LOl. and I bet alot of them would have a hard time spelling Guard

    Leave a comment:


  • Deputy Dawg
    replied
    At my job we are refered to as "Security Enforcement Officers" or SEO's. I made the mistake of thinking one of the new 1st shift guys was a temp and said, "are you one of the AIS Guards?" and he went off on me (he was wearing a white polo with no markings instead of a uniform). Luckily we are good friends now haha. A couple of the guys also refuse to be called a Security Guard seeing how we don't just monitor traffic at the security gates but also handle calls and do foot patrol. I Enjoy being referred to as a Security Officer over a guard as well. Just sounds more professional to me.
    Last edited by Deputy Dawg; 03-04-2008, 10:49 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • darkenna
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    Ontario is Canada. Canada has laws against "officer" in some Provinces.
    That is what he said.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Nauticus View Post
    I think that's what he said.
    The provinces have laws against it, not the federal government. (Hey I'm being picky but I'm a Quebecer - even us English ones are very weary about jurisdictions )

    Leave a comment:


  • Nauticus
    replied
    I think that's what he said.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    Ontario is Canada. Canada has laws against "officer" in some Provinces.
    Actually private security is a provincial domain. They are the provincial laws that prevent it, not federal.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Ontario is Canada. Canada has laws against "officer" in some Provinces.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    Originally posted by bigshotceo View Post
    Just don't refer to yourself as "officer", "law enforcement", "police" or "detective" and you'll be fine. "Security Enforcement Dude", for example, is OK.
    In florida we are security officers under state law. So we can obviously call ourselves officers as long as we dont try to pass ourselves off as law enforcement.

    Leave a comment:


  • SpecialAgentKC
    replied
    Originally posted by bigshotceo View Post
    Just don't refer to yourself as "officer", "law enforcement", "police" or "detective" and you'll be fine. "Security Enforcement Dude", for example, is OK.
    Except of course, those of us with police powers....

    There is a litany of titles used out there. I don't particularly care for the generalized use of the term Guard outside of private security, save for those performing a narrow, fixed-post assignment (and then only in what I would considered a denied area). The terms "law enforcement" and "police" are off limits for private security in Washington State. "Officer" and "Private Detective" are still allowed, as I understand it. However, the licensing category has been renamed "Private Investigator" instead of "Private Detective". Store Detective was a common term when I worked loss prevention during summer breaks during my undergrad days.... --K.
    Last edited by SpecialAgentKC; 03-03-2008, 07:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigshotceo
    replied
    Originally posted by Cactus View Post
    I am a guard, and if I refer to myself as anything else I could risk losing my license. I don't mind though, I take pride in guarding my clients information property.
    Just don't refer to yourself as "officer", "law enforcement", "police" or "detective" and you'll be fine. "Security Enforcement Dude", for example, is OK.

    Leave a comment:

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