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  • Cactus
    replied
    I am a guard, and if I refer to myself as anything else I could risk losing my license. I don't mind though, I take pride in guarding my clients information property.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nauticus
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    BC licenses ARMED bodyguards?
    Haha No. Most of the work I do is in the United States. Because some of Canada's laws, it's really hard to have a good protection industry up here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ewfr 'Gomulee
    replied
    Originally posted by dannyr619 View Post
    What is the title of an entry-level uniformed position at your company?

    Votes are public.
    At comet the entry level for their Security Staff is my level whilst I was there.
    Loss Prevention Officer from there it goes up to Loss Prevention manager of a store (depending on the size of the store) and from there to Loss Prevention Manager who will be incharge of move of the country's LPO population for the company.

    Older members of staff used to call me Security Police or the Company Police... both names now obselite but information on it can be found on Wikipedia under 'Security Officer' or Security Police.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Job description, uniform slides & organizational paraphernalia all clearly state security officer... everyone else simply calls us security, security guard OR guard

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Originally posted by Security View Post
    So you're saying that you're ashamed of being called a security guard, or that being a security guard is too beneath you?
    Mate, I have not been in a security uniform for the better part of 10 years now and I have not been a security officer in about 15 years. Yes I have filled in as relief roles or to appease a client during special event work but I am still a licenced security officer just like everyone else, but now hold every available qualification apart from technical services. 13 qualifications from a possible 15 including consulting and training and to renew all these certs I would be looking at well over $1k US per course.

    I have worked the 100 hour weeks working for other people and working for my own business, flown around the country and done my time overseas, but I don't look down from the top of the pyramid at the S/O's below me.

    After 21 years (wow old man alert) I reflect on my carreer making supervisor at 19 and duty manager at 21 which was not bad for a bloke who was working a f/t job, part time study and part time security career to pay for it all. I have never forgotten my fundamentals or roots, but having now almost completed my 2nd degree and spent a kidney, lung and liver on external qualifications to compete in our industry, then perhaps I am just a bee's pecker better than the standard run of the mill S/O.

    Read the post again and you will perhaps discover that I was not being an elitist but someone who wishes for recognition of his job title and qualifications whilst not being pigeon-holed like many other professions.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Nauticus View Post
    For my profession, we couldn't be called "protection officers" because we don't really have an office. I'm told that we're called Special Agents because we're more than just a bodyguard.

    After all, we have to be good at more things than firing a gun or taking someone out in close quarters combat. We also have to be excellent drivers and very skilled in pursuit driving, evasive driving, and ambush defense while driving. We have to be unbelievably fast, accurate, and effective in a practical situation with a handgun (or carbine if you work in very high risk areas). We have to be equally skilled in First Aid/First Respondant Medicine and other skills like that. We have to be intelligent enough to proactively out-think would-be criminals, or even smart enough to be able to detect minor risks (falling on stairs, car crashes) - yes, even a car crash caused by someone else is our responsibility. If our client falls on stairs that are unmarked by reflective tape, it's our responsibility. If our client chokes on a piece of meat, it's our responsibility. And of course we have to be knowledgable on laws and policies of any countries that a client wants to travel to. To top it all off, we have to be skilled and experienced at managing security at special events, because if our client is involved, we become essentially the head of security.

    I'm using my profession as an example, because I know it the best
    BC licenses ARMED bodyguards?

    Leave a comment:


  • Nauticus
    replied
    For my profession, we couldn't be called "protection officers" because we don't really have an office. I'm told that we're called Special Agents because we're more than just a bodyguard.

    After all, we have to be good at more things than firing a gun or taking someone out in close quarters combat. We also have to be excellent drivers and very skilled in pursuit driving, evasive driving, and ambush defense while driving. We have to be unbelievably fast, accurate, and effective in a practical situation with a handgun (or carbine if you work in very high risk areas). We have to be equally skilled in First Aid/First Respondant Medicine and other skills like that. We have to be intelligent enough to proactively out-think would-be criminals, or even smart enough to be able to detect minor risks (falling on stairs, car crashes) - yes, even a car crash caused by someone else is our responsibility. If our client falls on stairs that are unmarked by reflective tape, it's our responsibility. If our client chokes on a piece of meat, it's our responsibility. And of course we have to be knowledgable on laws and policies of any countries that a client wants to travel to. To top it all off, we have to be skilled and experienced at managing security at special events, because if our client is involved, we become essentially the head of security.

    I'm using my profession as an example, because I know it the best

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Security View Post
    There is nothing wrong with having pride in one's profession, so long as you are proud of the job you were hired for. I guess I just feel that people should not try to inflate their jobs titles if it's not really necessary. Reminds me of the dot-com era back in the 90s when Internet entrepreneurs were calling themselves anything that sounded cool (Chief Idea Guy, Chief Photocopying Officer, etc.) I think the title security officer is perfectly acceptible/appropriate, but anything other than that is a bit much, IMO.
    It is done as a marketing tool. We only have 4 Sales people in the hotel but one is the DIRECTOR of Corporate Sales, the other DIRECTOR of Tour & Travel etc. Makes the customer think they are dealing with the top person in the department no matter who they are dealing with.

    I am one who does not like being called a Guard - in fact I believe the new Quebec law will reserve the French version "Garde" for those doing O&R Watchman type security. So maybe I am stroking my ego - it's mine to stroke

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  • Security
    replied
    Originally posted by SecureTN View Post
    Pride in one's profession? Just a thought... I am proud of what I do, so I don't consider myself "just a Guard". My job entails multitudes more then just "guarding" something or someone... My 2 cents
    There is nothing wrong with having pride in one's profession, so long as you are proud of the job you were hired for. I guess I just feel that people should not try to inflate their jobs titles if it's not really necessary. Reminds me of the dot-com era back in the 90s when Internet entrepreneurs were calling themselves anything that sounded cool (Chief Idea Guy, Chief Photocopying Officer, etc.) I think the title security officer is perfectly acceptible/appropriate, but anything other than that is a bit much, IMO.

    Leave a comment:


  • Justice_Hound
    replied
    call me whatever.....

    I have been called all kinds of things=

    As a ranger- Squirrel Sheriff, Twig Pig, Ranger *ick, Power Ranger.

    The things I was called as a deputy sheriff I will not post on this forum.

    Now, I work in loss prevention and I am a Regional Loss Prevention Manager. But I respond to ***hole just as responsively.

    Because when it comes down to the line and you are getting handcuffed I am a private person making an arrest, so who really cares!

    Justice_Hound
    LP Manager

    Leave a comment:


  • SecureTN
    replied
    Originally posted by Security View Post
    I'm probably going to get flamed for asking this, but at this level, does it really matter if your title is guard, officer, or - lol - "agent"? It's still the same job, regardless of what you decide to call yourself. Here, I just refer to my staff as security guards since that is what the general public recognizes them as. I don't see the point in calling a security guard anything else unless they have some special job that distinguishes them from what everyone else with similar responsibilities do. Whether you call yourself a security guard or "public safety protection agent," pretty much everyone who sees you is going to recognize you as being a "security guard" and will most likely refer to you as one, so what is the point in creating some fancy title, other than satisfying the ego?
    Pride in one's profession? Just a thought... I am proud of what I do, so I don't consider myself "just a Guard". My job entails multitudes more then just "guarding" something or someone... My 2 cents

    Leave a comment:


  • Security
    replied
    Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
    Personally, I just call myself a Risk Manager as it encompasses a good 6 key areas and it is easier to explain. If I said Asset Protection - they would ask are you a security guard and would end up with a black eye for that.
    So you're saying that you're ashamed of being called a security guard, or that being a security guard is too beneath you?

    Leave a comment:


  • Security
    replied
    I'm probably going to get flamed for asking this, but at this level, does it really matter if your title is guard, officer, or - lol - "agent"? It's still the same job, regardless of what you decide to call yourself. Here, I just refer to my staff as security guards since that is what the general public recognizes them as. I don't see the point in calling a security guard anything else unless they have some special job that distinguishes them from what everyone else with similar responsibilities do. Whether you call yourself a security guard or "public safety protection agent," pretty much everyone who sees you is going to recognize you as being a "security guard" and will most likely refer to you as one, so what is the point in creating some fancy title, other than satisfying the ego?
    Last edited by Security; 03-02-2008, 02:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • darkenna
    replied
    Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
    We have not had bouncers for years in Australia - they are now Crowd Safety Officers, Crowd Controllers, Crowd Control Engineers, Door Hosts, Customer Service Officers, Guests Relations Officers.
    I've always liked "Crowd Control Technician", or simply "Security" for my guys in clubs & bars.

    Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
    I cringe at the term BODYGUARD as it shows me the typical hollywood style thug of a large bloke with more Bling than Mr T. showing more rolls than a bakery through his t-shirt.
    "Hihi! I'm Miss Celeb-de-momente, and this is my Chief Mook, Guido! Teehee!"

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    We have not had bouncers for years in Australia - they are now Crowd Safety Officers, Crowd Controllers, Crowd Control Engineers, Door Hosts, Customer Service Officers, Guests Relations Officers.

    Personally, I just call myself a Risk Manager as it encompasses a good 6 key areas and it is easier to explain. If I said Asset Protection - they would ask are you a security guard and would end up with a black eye for that.

    I was the National Loss Prevention Manager until 12 months back and became the National Risk Manager and have fought off all title changes as I now oversee the audit function officially. We are sadly following the same name change titles as the USA which is confusing people outside of retail and the hospitality industry and whilst I am almost retired from CPP (just no $$$ for me to work) I cringe at the term BODYGUARD as it shows me the typical hollywood style thug of a large bloke with more Bling than Mr T. showing more rolls than a bakery through his t-shirt.

    Leave a comment:

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