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Two really great things about the security industry...

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  • Patriot1871
    replied
    I was Brand spanking new out of the marchbox last year when I started working security here in NYC. I thought I would get my guard permit & work as sometype of doorman. parttime.. nadda on that! Since I started Ipart time have found out that there so many different paths to go in this field. I work for a great company with a professional attitude, look & rep along with a loyality to its employees.
    In my short year in the field with this just one company I've worked so many different type of events while also doing tradional guard work. I've decided since I actually injoy doing this job while hating my full time job which such the opposite of it that I decided to go get my P.P.S. certifcation & get into the executive protection field. I'm having such a blast the few gray hairs that I've been getting are starting to go away

    Leave a comment:


  • sunnysecurity
    replied
    I certainly can't complain. I have done pest control for 20 years, and had to move due to my wife's health. Sold my PC biz and got this job in Security. It's like you said - put forth the initative, take ownership of your job and you can go places. I am day shift supervisor, and have gotten $2 an hour more than I started with last March. We start our officers here at $12 an hour, and our upper management now says that we have the best security force we have had in 30 years.

    Cross your "t"'s, dot your "i"'s, look sharp and be a professional. You'll go far. We must be doing something right - our Asst. Gen. Mgr. keeps giving us free meals at the mountain lodges, and those aren't cheap. He's happy.

    Leave a comment:


  • BailBondInvestigator
    replied
    Originally posted by OMG_Ihatethisjob View Post
    Your level of job satisfaction is indicative of your management's concern on their personnel's morale. It sounds like you guys are making a living wage in your neck of the wood. I'm in the Los Angeles area, and the guard companies here REALLY SUCKS Due to the high cost of living in California, the state minimum wage is $8 an hour (USA federal minimum wage is $5.85 / hr); just 38% more than the federal minimum wage. My company starts at $9 an hr; just 13% over the state minimum wage. There's too many guard companies in my area, and the competition is forcing everyone to pay their guards cheap to keep the rates competitive. The only thing I like about my company, is they're too cheap to hire enough roving supervisors. I work an unarmed post, yet carry a PR24, mace, & a M18 airtaser (which looks like a real gun when its holstered). Air tasers are not regulated in California. So I'm working this shopping center, looking like a fully-armed S/O. I'm going to be sooo fired if my company sees the way I'm dressed, but at $9 an hour, and with so many guard companies in the Los Angeles area, I'm sure I won't have problems finding another guard company.
    I am in your neck of the woods and, if you are still around a year later, I would be really curious what company you're with. PM me if you get this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ewfr 'Gomulee
    replied
    In England it's not as easy to go up in the ranks in Security... unless of course you are working with a group of Guards.
    My new assignment will leave me all by my lonesome all day everyday... I'll be my own boss.

    I can not tell you how proud I am to have been given this assignment by Reliance Security and even though I cannot actually go up in rank on this assignment (I'll be stuck as a grunt) I am still happy that they trust me enough to give me this job.

    I'll knock 'em dead I will!

    I'm not sure how companies in my country go about with ranks, I know that some companies do have rank promotions because it gives the guys and girls something to work towards but other than that.. I can't tell you. :P

    Oh and hey! I want a beer too!

    Leave a comment:


  • inman
    replied
    We have one lady that works for us that has been here since 1965!!!


    Talk about loving your job!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Chaple
    replied
    http://www.themartialist.com/pecom/f...detotrolls.htm
    Does anyone get the feeling we have an agent provocateur among us?
    Last edited by Mr. Chaple; 02-29-2008, 07:53 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • OMG_Ihatethisjob
    replied
    Glad you're happy

    Your level of job satisfaction is indicative of your management's concern on their personnel's morale. It sounds like you guys are making a living wage in your neck of the wood. I'm in the Los Angeles area, and the guard companies here REALLY SUCKS Due to the high cost of living in California, the state minimum wage is $8 an hour (USA federal minimum wage is $5.85 / hr); just 38% more than the federal minimum wage. My company starts at $9 an hr; just 13% over the state minimum wage. There's too many guard companies in my area, and the competition is forcing everyone to pay their guards cheap to keep the rates competitive. The only thing I like about my company, is they're too cheap to hire enough roving supervisors. I work an unarmed post, yet carry a PR24, mace, & a M18 airtaser (which looks like a real gun when its holstered). Air tasers are not regulated in California. So I'm working this shopping center, looking like a fully-armed S/O. I'm going to be sooo fired if my company sees the way I'm dressed, but at $9 an hour, and with so many guard companies in the Los Angeles area, I'm sure I won't have problems finding another guard company.

    Leave a comment:


  • ericjones80
    replied
    there's a good amount of seniority here....most of the guys have over a year and a half. There is alot of work in my area though.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
    That's true for most areas. But here in the hinterlands of Central Minnesota, we only have 18 guys & 5 accounts. Our newest guy has been around about 4 months, and everyone else has a year at least. We just promoted one site supervisor from OFC to Corporal after 3 years. I have several guards who will make excellent supervisors, but we just don't have openings for them unless they move to another region or we pick up more business. But with the state of the economy right now, I don't see that happening.
    I have a similar situation. Little turnover and not a lot of ways to move up. Our contract company doesn't rotate officers between accounts. So you may get assigned to a site and work under the same site supervisor for 3 or 4 years and never move up past being a basic guard.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
    That's true for most areas. But here in the hinterlands of Central Minnesota, we only have 18 guys & 5 accounts. Our newest guy has been around about 4 months, and everyone else has a year at least. We just promoted one site supervisor from OFC to Corporal after 3 years. I have several guards who will make excellent supervisors, but we just don't have openings for them unless they move to another region or we pick up more business. But with the state of the economy right now, I don't see that happening.
    Sounds like you have a pretty stable team. I'd say you're the exception, but by no means the only one.

    In that case, an individual might have to move to a region in the company where there's more opportunity due to growth in business and/or turnover.

    Leave a comment:


  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    1. It doesn't take as long to build up seniority in many security organizations as it does in many other fields where the turnover and attrition rates are lower. Although this is an extreme example, I know of one individual who found himself to be the "senior officer" at his facility five months after he was hired. Again, I know this is an exception, but it is still illustrative.
    That's true for most areas. But here in the hinterlands of Central Minnesota, we only have 18 guys & 5 accounts. Our newest guy has been around about 4 months, and everyone else has a year at least. We just promoted one site supervisor from OFC to Corporal after 3 years. I have several guards who will make excellent supervisors, but we just don't have openings for them unless they move to another region or we pick up more business. But with the state of the economy right now, I don't see that happening.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Security View Post
    Yeah, you're not kidding! I took a part-time job as a security guard back in November just to pay a few bills while I get through grad school. After two months of working here, I've been promoted to security manager and I'm making almost four times the amount than what I was hired for... and I'm only 22! I'll probably quit after I graduate in 9 months and move on to something else, but I've never seen any other industry like this where you can get promoted so quickly!
    Well, good for you! You must have been doing some things right, too...not just "building up seniority".

    Leave a comment:


  • Security
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    1. It doesn't take as long to build up seniority in many security organizations as it does in many other fields where the turnover and attrition rates are lower. Although this is an extreme example, I know of one individual who found himself to be the "senior officer" at his facility five months after he was hired. Again, I know this is an exception, but it is still illustrative.
    Yeah, you're not kidding! I took a part-time job as a security guard back in November just to pay a few bills while I get through grad school. After two months of working here, I've been promoted to security manager and I'm making almost four times the amount than what I was hired for... and I'm only 22! I'll probably quit after I graduate in 9 months and move on to something else, but I've never seen any other industry like this where you can get promoted so quickly!
    Last edited by Security; 02-24-2008, 09:11 PM.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Cope - I had that cold beer for you - 4 actually LOL as I was compiling a report for work at home.

    Sec - I could not agree more with you as some people have struggled with language skills or school and in security it brings everyone up to par by running schedules, routines and above all giving everyone the chance to progress forward. I have worked with Dyslexics and helped them get into the industry whilst teaching them on night shift, techno-phobics who cannot use a PC so taught them how to compile a report online (easy stuff for them to learn) and the opportunity for those without completing highschool to have a career beyond a factory job or dishwasher (I mean no offence to anyone but someone on minimum dollars can double their income in the industry).

    To our senior guys, yes when you retire people assume you are too old to be employed for part time work but many ex police or military can work part time - enjoy semi-retirement and bring their knowledge with them. These hidden mentors are perfect to learn from as I did as a young lad new to the industry which goes a long way to establishing the industry basis again.

    In brief just that 10% more effort in your customer service or duties is going to go along way in your career as it could be a simple case of helping someone change a tyre, or push their car off the road whilst in uniform or even so much as a simple good morning to staff (even if you are not awake yourself yet). A bit of initiative in this industry goes along way - even if the middle management don't see it.

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    1. It doesn't take as long to build up seniority in many security organizations as it does in many other fields where the turnover and attrition rates are lower. Although this is an extreme example, I know of one individual who found himself to be the "senior officer" at his facility five months after he was hired. Again, I know this is an exception, but it is still illustrative.

    2. It doesn't take much to distinguish yourself. It has been said that the difference between "excellence" and "mediocrity" is usually only about a difference of 20% in extra effort, and I agree. If you had put in about 20% more effort in that class in high school, you could have earned an "A" or at least a "B" instead of a "C"...right? Come on now, be honest.

    Since "mediocrity" or "the average" in the security field is as low as it is, even simple things like being on time EVERY day, doing a GOOD job on your reports, keeping your uniform sharp and your gear clean and serviceable, carrying out orders promptly and consistently, writing up thoughtful suggestions for improvement in services rendered, volunteering for special assignments or overtime, and letting management know that you're taking relevant courses to improve your usefulness to the organization can rocket you to the attention of your superiors...even though most of these things are NOTHING MORE THAN YOU SHOULD BE DOING ANYWAY. In other words, just being dependable and doing your job conscientiously is enough to put you in the "superior" class of officer. Add to that a little dash of initiative, as demonstrated by volunteering, extra training, etc. and you'll put yourself in the top echelon.

    Sec-Trainer:
    If it were not for the fact that I have to leave in about 90 minutes and work
    Satuday evening as a Rover, I would toast your comments with a cold beer.

    Name another profession where on a cold Winter's night do you get to
    walk in the deep woods checking fence lines on patrol, and enjoy the
    peace and quiet


    I have been a Security Guard/Account Manager for 36 years, and there
    are rare days that I don't love this job. I have worked at 50-plus various and wild and wacky different posts and sites in those many years, I am quite content.

    And if you hustle you will get ahead. But like anything else, you have to
    give 150%.

    Leave a comment:

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