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  • Security Management... more than patrol.

    I was somewhat disturbed by a comment in another thread that stated that security work is for those that can't make it as cops. While I understand that this may be an opinion shared by some, it is my hope that this is not an idea that is shared by all. If this is how the industry perceives itself, it will become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

    As I have been expressed in other threads, the Security Industry is a great deal broader than most people give it credit for. I think the problem is that many of the people in business and in the security industry, particularly at the security patrol level, don't see the "big picture" that is Security Management. Security Patrol is actually a rather small part of Physical Security, which is a small part of Security Management as a whole. Success at Security Management is not possible if it is limited to those that can't make it as cops.

    In truth, even if someone could make it as a cop, they are not really what is needed for security, as their experience only applies to some aspects of Security Management and may even prove detrimental if the "cop mentality" can not be changed into a "security mentality". Security Management is a completely different perspective than Law Enforcement, with different tools, different rules, and different missions.

    The need for experienced and qualified Security Management experts is growing and I can tell you right now that the people stepping up to meet the need are not those who could not make it as cops. It is people like myself who have enough experience on both sides of the fence to realize what I have said here... that Security Management is a huge field that takes a larger perspective and multi-faceted approach.

    Resigning security to anything other than professionals is selling the whole industry short.
    -Jedi-
    Semper Paratus

  • #2
    Security is a profession on its own and it is growing. I share your frustration in that most CEO's tend to think that being a cop makes you instantly qualified to manage security.

    During my time in the security industry I had managed a few security divisions, I learned to avoid hiring cops as I found they were mostly lazy and thought they knew more than you. The problem is that most clients are willing to pay much more per hour for an off-duty cop, so I had to keep some on the payroll.

    California Security Blog
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Jedi View Post
      I was somewhat disturbed by a comment in another thread that stated that security work is for those that can't make it as cops. While I understand that this may be an opinion shared by some, it is my hope that this is not an idea that is shared by all. If this is how the industry perceives itself, it will become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

      As I have been expressed in other threads, the Security Industry is a great deal broader than most people give it credit for. I think the problem is that many of the people in business and in the security industry, particularly at the security patrol level, don't see the "big picture" that is Security Management. Security Patrol is actually a rather small part of Physical Security, which is a small part of Security Management as a whole. Success at Security Management is not possible if it is limited to those that can't make it as cops.

      In truth, even if someone could make it as a cop, they are not really what is needed for security, as their experience only applies to some aspects of Security Management and may even prove detrimental if the "cop mentality" can not be changed into a "security mentality". Security Management is a completely different perspective than Law Enforcement, with different tools, different rules, and different missions.

      The need for experienced and qualified Security Management experts is growing and I can tell you right now that the people stepping up to meet the need are not those who could not make it as cops. It is people like myself who have enough experience on both sides of the fence to realize what I have said here... that Security Management is a huge field that takes a larger perspective and multi-faceted approach.

      Resigning security to anything other than professionals is selling the whole industry short.
      Praise the Lord !!! Finally someone who has hit a homerun into the upper decks for us Account Manager's working for Securitas, Allied-Barton, Wackenhut. Bless you
      http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

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      • #4
        OK this has struck a nerve with me and speaks of my frustration with both professions. I come from several years of service in both the police and security fields (road, supervision, and top management). Your comments of the "cop mentality" and comments of police officers being lazy only further pushes the two professions apart. Police and security officers should act as two distinct sides of the same coin, and avoid the Us vs. Them notions. We are ALL "protection" officers. I have seen senior level police officers that should be trusted with meter maid duties, and contrastly I have seen security officer and managers that would be better off digging ditches for a living. Yes, there are lazy cops, some even bordering on embarrassing. However, those number are still less than the same type of people in the security field. Until we can collectively bring ourselves to a higher level of training and conduct/professionalism we will always be up against the rent-a-cop or wannabe tauntings. Industry-wide in our nation, licensure and governing regulations must be revisited and standards brought up closer to the public sector. Only then can we achieve the recognition as a professional career and not have our job listings posted in the 'unskilled labor' section of the want ads, not to mention the publics opinion. We must educate the public officers about our profession and demonstrate by example of quality service and personnel. Now, just because they were cops really doesn't make them a good security manager - agreed. But just because you have been turning keys in a clock for twelve years also doesn't qualify a person for management. Both backgrounds must be only a qualifying start of a closer examination of ability and consciences.

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        • #5
          From what I've seen...

          I have made a few observations about both LEO's and S/O's working in Private Security. Note:these come from what I have personally seen.

          1. LEO's look down on working as S/O's and do not motivate themselves to got out of their way to secure a site. They basically see this as a few extra hours of pay.

          2. WBS are useless and make up a good chunk of those that are out there. They make all of us look like total hacks. They also give the negative appearance that is cited by most LEO's.

          3. Really good S/O's are few and far between and will usually jet out at the first sign of a better paying contract elsewhere.

          4. LEO's cannot stand getting calls from S/O's on jobsites.

          5. LEO's from #4 are surprised when S/O's are well-versed in state law. (like my former company harped on.)

          6. In most circumstances in Texas, the state requires LEO's to go through the same classes/certifications that us lowly S/O's do. Guess they aren't as sharp as they think, huh?

          7. These are two groups of people who should be working together. S/O's are an LEA's first line, so to speak. We see, hear, and react to things alot sooner than an LEO can because we are there when it happens. Conversely, having the LEO's bring back-up is always nice when dealing with violent subjects. Plus, LEO's tend to pull more frequent patrols in areas where they have friendly relationships with the S/O's.

          Just a few things that I have observed in a few short years doing this.

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          • #6
            Yes and often you find out that some of the LEO's were part of the "Subway Quality Control Team" and never left the station too much in their careers. Like any industry there are good and bad people and yes as Dougo stated, those who are goers are going to walk looking for a better wage or career path. There is a high attrition rate in this industry as all it takes is a new Ops Manager and people will walk or want to join the company. I have worked with some training dropouts who believe they were going to be the next Dirty Harry (but failed the typing - yes 30 wpm was too hard), together with those who only talk about it and never go through with any applications.

            Yes LEO's do look down on the industry which is why I have always ensured anything under my control as been beyond expections from statements to briefs of evidence to even complying with the rules of evidence. Hey I am all sure we have had to deal with other companies where the standards are low or they are just not caring what happens to reports etc and I guess being mentored from day 1 by expolice who drummed it into my head how things had to be done with , report writing and correct terminologies, etc.

            Education and Public perception is going to assist making improvements but for every 1 outstanding officer there are close to 100 - 500 slobs who just don't care what happens provided they go home on time. Quality officers do not come cheap and to keep them at an account makes things difficult becasue if you pay a premium, everyone else's hand is out for a payrise.
            "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 8901 View Post
              OK this has struck a nerve with me and speaks of my frustration with both professions. I come from several years of service in both the police and security fields (road, supervision, and top management). Your comments of the "cop mentality" and comments of police officers being lazy only further pushes the two professions apart. Police and security officers should act as two distinct sides of the same coin, and avoid the Us vs. Them notions. We are ALL "protection" officers. I have seen senior level police officers that should be trusted with meter maid duties, and contrastly I have seen security officer and managers that would be better off digging ditches for a living. Yes, there are lazy cops, some even bordering on embarrassing. However, those number are still less than the same type of people in the security field. Until we can collectively bring ourselves to a higher level of training and conduct/professionalism we will always be up against the rent-a-cop or wannabe tauntings. Industry-wide in our nation, licensure and governing regulations must be revisited and standards brought up closer to the public sector. Only then can we achieve the recognition as a professional career and not have our job listings posted in the 'unskilled labor' section of the want ads, not to mention the publics opinion. We must educate the public officers about our profession and demonstrate by example of quality service and personnel. Now, just because they were cops really doesn't make them a good security manager - agreed. But just because you have been turning keys in a clock for twelve years also doesn't qualify a person for management. Both backgrounds must be only a qualifying start of a closer examination of ability and consciences.

              I have read over my original post several times... I even looked over other posts I have made that even remotely touch on this subject, but I can't seem to find any place that I either called LEO lazy or encouraged an "us vs. them" mentality.

              All I have done is state that Security and Law Enforcement are different.
              Security Management is a completely different perspective than Law Enforcement, with different tools, different rules, and different missions.
              I don't believe in, nor do I encourage, an "us vs. them" mentality. We are partners in safety with two distinct roles. You used the coin analogy, however there are more than two sides to this and they are never (should never be) opposing the other. It is more similar to ingredients for a good recipe... each has a different purpose, but all come together to make something that is great!
              -Jedi-
              Semper Paratus

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              • #8
                Security Management in its broadest sense has very little to do with the enforcement of laws. Its about the lessening of risk to acceptable levels for an organization and its investors / vendors...

                A law enforcement officer AND a security guard, without additional professional development in consultancy or management, would be hard pressed to do all the aspects of the job of a C-level manager.

                Security is more than protecting the client/employer from crime or disorder by investigation, detection, response, and enforcement.

                Without proper professional development, neither the guard nor the cop is going to know wtf they're doing. That's why when some clients think "I'll just hire a 10 year vet cop and he'll know exactly what to do," then dump InfoSec requirements as well as Physical Security requirements in his lap...

                WTF is all this, this is NOT what I learned on the force.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                • #9
                  There is a natural interface between law enforcement and security where officers from one side meet those on the other side. It would be beneficial to both sides if mutual respect flowed both ways at that interface.

                  It's easy to say that "respect is earned" - more or less implying that if I don't respect you, it's YOUR fault: You haven't earned it (or, worse, you have earned my DISrespect in some way). However, it isn't quite that simple, because in many cases I come into the situation already having a prejudice about you (or about the class of people to which you belong, such as LEO or SO). In such a case, the problem isn't a matter of your "earning" my respect, but about MY stinkin' thinkin'.

                  ..and there's a whooooooole lot of stinkin' thinkin' on each side about those on the other side. Like most prejudices, we start with a stereotype that's a putrid mixture of ignorance, misinformation, oversimplification, misapplied generalizations, jealousy, hatred and stupidity, and then we hang all of those negative traits around another person's neck and say "Prove me wrong!"

                  The human mind is a frightening thing sometimes.
                  "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                  "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                  "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                  "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Jedi View Post
                    In truth, even if someone could make it as a cop, they are not really what is needed for security, as their experience only applies to some aspects of Security Management and may even prove detrimental if the "cop mentality" can not be changed into a "security mentality". Security Management is a completely different perspective than Law Enforcement, with different tools, different rules, and different missions.
                    When I attempt to explain to new officers and clients the difference between LE and security, I use this example: When a crime is committed on client property, the cop asks "which way did he go?" The security man asks, "how did this happen, and how can we prevent a recurrence?" Our job is the prevent bad things from happening. Too often bad things that happen can be attributed to a deficiency in the security program.

                    Like everyone else in this business, I still come up against the mentality that only the cops know how to prevent crime. Not long ago, I gave a client a list of recommendations - that they requested - for securing a new area of their facility. The client said "that's nice, gee thanks, but we have the Chief of Police coming over tomorrow." The Chief arrived the next day; walked around a bit; and reviewed my recommendations. At the meeting, the Chief told the client that my suggestions were "practical, well thought out, and effective." The Chief had a couple additional suggestions which were rejected by the client as being "too much for our facility."

                    I found out the other day that the Chief is coming back to walk through another area of the facility. I have not been asked for my input this time around.

                    You would think that after 30 years in this business I'd get used to being treated like an idiot whose only abilities are rattling doors and turning off lights.
                    But it still makes me wanna scream.
                    At least the Chief is on my side!

                    Rant Over.
                    Last edited by Badge714; 02-25-2008, 02:55 PM. Reason: Grammar
                    "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Jedi View Post
                      I was somewhat disturbed by a comment in another thread that stated that security work is for those that can't make it as cops.
                      That was a comment by a troll... take it with a grain of salt.
                      "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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