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Earning the most $$$ as a Security Officer

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  • #31
    I have my licences still for 3 states in Australia and I could not waltz in and say "here I am give it to me now please". I had to be assessed, table all my certifications and qualifications and in 1 state had to go through their legal changes in a 2 x 2 hour exams which let me work as a PI in that state as well. Sure it cost me thousands but I also had company licences to work in these 2 states even if was just me and a dozen bodies but it meant I could be a Dir. of Security in that state legally. Not up to us to say how well we fit their profiles, we just need to say look you want this - I have this - and will do this and this to cover your requirements.

    Now universally, a degree or an associates will cover most things together with the authority's own training program. My former business partner, a 30 year ex police officer and myself sat through 12 hours BS in 1 day or mandatory training with newbies and people who could not speak english to order a glass of water at Evian, but we had to do it because the law requires us to go through the BS and pain of it to maintain our licences.
    "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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    • #32
      Originally posted by OMG_Ihatethisjob View Post
      I think its better to under-react, and just "observe and report;" than to over-react, and find yourself (and your employer) getting sued for negligence by your actions.
      I disagree. I think it is in fact best to know your laws and your rights as a security officer which will allow you to make the best possible choice in a specific situation, neither over- or under-reacting.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
        There is a department in America that pay a Chief Deputy 25k a year? What did the deputies get? Minimum wage?

        I know that some places pay police officers/deputies poor wages, but that takes the cake.
        My Lieutenant was Chief Deputy Sheriff in a small East Texas county, even served as acting Sheriff when the sitting Sheriff died. He made 9 dollars an hour. Back when he join the starting pay for an entry level College District Police Officer was $15 per hour, he got a 6 dollar an hour raise just coming to work for us lol, he has to drive an hour to and from work though.

        55% of American LEOs work for the biggest 1,000 agencies (and so can expect to make decent wages), the other 45% are spread out over the other almost 17,000 American police agencies. Some of the smaller PDs (like some campus PDs, small investigative agencies, Suburban or Enclave PDs ect ect) pay pretty good, but the bulk of those small agencies are small town rural PDs and Sheriff's offices and have crap for pay.

        The 45k per year national average police salary is heavily influenced by those top 1000 agencies.
        ~Black Caesar~
        Corbier's Commandos

        " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

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        • #34
          It seems to me that many rural LEO's who are paid poorly have chosen the job because they love LE and are in it for the right reason. The same is true with pilots. The majority are not making much money. The $$ comes after a pilot has been with a major airline long enough to fly left seat on the "big irons." Pilots love to fly - that's why they do it.

          SO's work for low pay for one of two reasons:

          - They may be unskilled, disqualified for LE, or unable to find other employment

          - They love the work but the area does not pay well.

          I am in the 2nd category.
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #35
            I suppose making the $$$$ is all about where you work. Priviate Companies {Contract Guard Services} usually pay around $10.00 to $14.00 an hour at least in my area {Philadelphia Region}

            I'm an In-House Officer working a 1200 + acre Oil Refinery. - Yes there is $$$ to be made in the Oil Industry and our Security Force is no exception to the rule. In my first complete year {2007} I made a little over $70K which of course included some OT but not alot. We're not armed and have it pretty easy as far as responsibilities are concerned. We do basic Security Work, Patrols, Electronic Monitoring {Cameras, Gates, and stuff like that} We do issue traffic citations with in the plant which is all point system based.

            We respond to emergencies {Medicals, Fires, Leaks, Spills} and assist where needed similar to a small town police force. Some of our personnel belong to the In-House Fire and Emergency Services Unit {My-Self Included} and respond in our off hours as Firefighters, Fire Apparatus Drivers, EMTs, and Haz-Mat Technicians for which we're well compensated.

            We're a well rounded unit {Security isn't just sitting around anymore punching a detex clock}

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
              When Rio Hondo makes the claim that the certification is good across the USA, they are telling the truth for the most part. All states and Puerto Rico and DC allow certified peace officers from other states "challenge" their State Peace officer exams.

              When I as considering moving to Georgia, I checked with GPOST about this (the last thing I want to do is go back through a full police academy, once is enough lol) and was pointed to their website's FAQ section.

              http://www.gapost.org/faq.htm



              This is the web page for out of state LEOs coming in to Texas.

              TCLEOSE Out of State Peace officer requirements

              And the one for out of staters moving to California...

              http://www.post.ca.gov/faqs/become.asp



              (BCW = the same thing most states do.)

              A Peace officer's license from one state is NOT an automatic "in" in another state, but it is a major major short cut. You still have to take their peace officer exam, but you usually don't have to go through a whole Academy again.
              First, all of you will want to thank BC for posting this as it avoided me making another of my exhaustive and exhausting posts to clarify "cross-credentialing" of certified POST training between states. Excellent.

              Second (and don't turn blue, this will be brief), I would second EMTGuard's statement that the original post missed a number of opportunities for people to improve themselves and move into good positions within the industry...not by leaving it. Proprietary (in-house) security would probably be my first choice, and I would select an industry (e.g., utilities, healthcare, etc.) where they pay a good wage to those in middle and upper security management positions, not just where they pay the best wages to officers. Take the long-term view and make the determination that you're going to do what it takes to move up the ladder. Usually, this means becoming very knowledgeable not just about security, but also about the industry you've chosen to work in, such as healthcare, utilities, property management, etc. You need to be able to speak the "language" of business, but this can be acquired if you want to.
              Last edited by SecTrainer; 02-23-2008, 01:24 PM.
              "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

              "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

              "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

              "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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              • #37
                A close friend's father in the US, is the County Sheriff in a small banjo playin` town in Miss. They have only have about 8 f/t officers and many spouses back up as summer deputies for the extra $$$. Wages are very low but they also get county paid rental houses, fully maintained vehicles (for any call outs) and after a find of a drug bust in the 1990's had a major cash influx for the $$$ located at one location (hence the new rental homes) which kept people from leaving the county. Cash is not always everything, ease of travel, some benefits and home town pride goes a long way.
                "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
                  There is a department in America that pay a Chief Deputy 25k a year? What did the deputies get? Minimum wage?

                  I know that some places pay police officers/deputies poor wages, but that takes the cake.
                  I think 25K a year is minimum wage...
                  Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
                    I think 25K a year is minimum wage...
                    Unfortunatly it isn't. As an Area Supervisor I was making 23,566. For a 40 hour week that came out to about 11.33 per hour. Now if I only worked 40 hours

                    Not sure about where you are but in FL min wage is 6.67 ph or 13,874 per year. I now of a in house security dept at a hospital here that their officers start out at not much more than that (7ph last I was told). This hospital is not located in the nicest part of town BTW.
                    SecurityProfessional is Back up and running!

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                    • #40
                      Yep, Federal Minimum wage is $5.85 per hour. Assuming a 40 hour work week, thats $12,168 per year. That's crazy, but there it is.

                      Good thing is many states and even cities have higher minimum wages. Minimum wage levels.
                      ~Black Caesar~
                      Corbier's Commandos

                      " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
                        Yep, Federal Minimum wage is $5.85 per hour. Assuming a 40 hour work week, thats $12,168 per year. That's crazy, but there it is.

                        Good thing is many states and even cities have higher minimum wages. Minimum wage levels.
                        EEP! We top out at $21.95 p/h + differentials for nights ($1), weekends ($.90 p/h), FTO pay ($.90 p/h while training). Supervisors top out at $27.00 p/h plus the night and weekend diff's. I cleard about $48K for 2007.
                        Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

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                        • #42
                          $5.85 an hour. You will be making that in Tennessee.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                          • #43
                            State correctional officer's training is not accepted by city police or sheriff's in California. State correctional officers are not certified by POST, they have STC and CPOST (Standards and Training for Corrections and Correctonal Peace Officers Standards and Training).

                            Just my two cents.

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                            • #44
                              Our officers top out at $52,250 and as a supervisor I top out at $67,760. However both officers and supervisors are overtime eligible and get triple time for holidays. We also have profit sharing which generally averages around 8 percent a year.

                              An officer or supervisor that likes overtime can bolster his/her earnings considerably. Overtime and holiday pay is also included in the profit sharing.

                              We also get a rule of 90 pension and a 401K. Needless to say, if a union came calling here, they would get laughed out of the building.

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                              • #45
                                One correction, CDC officers were POST certified until C-Post came into being. I have a basic post certificate from those times. I started with CDC in 1989. I think that they went to the c-post thing because too many cadets were unable to pass regular post without the dept spending a lot of money on classes that a corrections officer did not need, but were required for a regular post cert.
                                Murphy was an optomist.

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