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  • Deputy mistreatment

    Anyone catch this? I was watching Fox News and saw the video clip - unbelievable...

    http://www.news10.net/display_story.aspx?storyid=38364

    They were saying that the head guys hadn't even seen the video until today...wow.

  • #2
    Maybe the suspect resembled her ex-husband

    For her to react like that, I'd speculate he either physically resembled someone she hated (like maybe her ex-husband), or it could a racial incident, though the news didn't show picts, or mention what race Brian Sterner was. It sounds like the county of Hillsborough, Florida is going to to be writing a huge check in the near future to settle this out of court. I'm guessing the initial court filing will be a million dollars, including punitive damages; then the out-of-court settlement will be $250K, seeing that medical technicians had concluded there were no internal injuries, as he claimed he had suffered broken ribs from his fall.

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    • #3
      I highly doubt the arrested subject reminded the deputy of someone she hated or it was racial (come on now). The deputy was probably so used to inmates trying to get over on her, that she f***ed up.

      It's unfortunate that an incident like that occurred. I wonder what kind a discipline history she has. It could be that she has a history of unnecessary force, or this could be the only time she lost it, and now will most likely pay with her career.

      Stay Safe.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by DeputyJ View Post
        I highly doubt the arrested subject reminded the deputy of someone she hated or it was racial (come on now). The deputy was probably so used to inmates trying to get over on her, that she f***ed up.

        It's unfortunate that an incident like that occurred. I wonder what kind a discipline history she has. It could be that she has a history of unnecessary force, or this could be the only time she lost it, and now will most likely pay with her career.

        Stay Safe.
        I've done that job and I have to agree. There was nothing to suggest the incident was racially motivated or that it triggered some sort of post traumatic stress episode. It would be rash to speculate otherwise. She was wrong and I'm sure she will lose her job. She might even go to jail over it.
        I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
        -Lieutenant Commander Data
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        • #5
          When first working clubs as a young lad, I had a man come in with his g/f who was holding him up. I assumed he was drunk and she was helping him. I then looked down and saw the cast on his foot and pointed to the cashier before opening the door for him to go in. Never ASSUME !!!!!

          Perhaps Benny Hinn was on TV and you know how good he claims to be and all ? Unless you are a Dr - never claim to be someone who is. Witnesses this with a former boss who claimed 1 of my crew was bogus on his sick leave form and then I made sure she apologised when he had a letter from his Dr specifying the nature of his injury. Bloody idiot !!!
          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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          • #6
            Benny Hinn LOL Hmm... Great defense. Faith Healing. I would go with that!
            I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
            -Lieutenant Commander Data
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            • #7
              That went over my head

              Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
              .....Perhaps Benny Hinn was on TV....
              Not familiar with that name, and had to go to Wikipedia to understand your post. I don't watch televangelist at all, and had felt justified in my skepticism of religious leaders when the Jim & Tammy Bakker scandal broke out in the late 1990s.

              Originally posted by DeputyJ View Post
              .... it was racial (come on now)....
              Growing up outside of Los Angeles, I've always heard rumors and reports of LEOs using excessive force. It wasn't until I came close to getting beaten by Ohio State Troopers in the late 80s ( I was working as a 48-state trucker in the USA) that I became distrustful of white LEOs. When the Rodney King scandal happened in 1991, my distrust of white LEOs was justified.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by OMG_Ihatethisjob View Post
                Not familiar with that name, and had to go to Wikipedia to understand your post. I don't watch televangelist at all, and had felt justified in my skepticism of religious leaders when the Jim & Tammy Bakker scandal broke out in the late 1990s.



                Growing up outside of Los Angeles, I've always heard rumors and reports of LEOs using excessive force. It wasn't until I came close to getting beaten by Ohio State Troopers in the late 80s ( I was working as a 48-state trucker in the USA) that I became distrustful of white LEOs. When the Rodney King scandal happened in 1991, my distrust of white LEOs was justified.
                It seems are quick to judge a group based on the actions of a few.

                Rodney King’s incident had less to do with race and more to do with his reputation and known criminal conduct. If one contends they beat him, they were “beating” Rodney King; not so much a black man. It doesn’t make it anymore right but it does shed a little different light on things.

                In this case (as reported), it was reckless to suggest race was a dynamic. There was no inference of that. None at all.

                I just watched the video. It appears the officer is black and the prisoner is white. So much for distrusting white officers...
                Last edited by Tennsix; 02-13-2008, 11:46 AM.
                I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
                -Lieutenant Commander Data
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tennsix View Post
                  It seems are quick to judge a group based on the actions of a few.

                  Rodney King’s incident had less to do with race and more to do with his reputation and known criminal conduct. If one contends they beat him, they were “beating” Rodney King; not so much a black man. It doesn’t make it anymore right but it does shed a little different light on things.

                  In this case (as reported), it was reckless to suggest race was a dynamic. There was no inference of that. None at all.
                  Perhaps your view is representative of a portion of the population. I'm in Los Angeles, and was affected by the Riots, which resulted when the LEOs were acquitted of the charges by an 83% white jury. The outcome was not the same when the LEOs were retried the 2nd time, by a mixed-raced jury. The Los Angeles Times published a poll after the 2nd trial, and people's opinion of the case was divided along racial lines. Latino, blacks, and orientals felt King was beaten because of his race, while whites felt the beating was justified because he refused to obey orders to get down on the ground.

                  If you had not seen the entire video, it starts out as the officers shouting verbal command for King to get down on the ground. King just stood there like he didn't speak English, but was not combative, as all the LEOs had written on their official report. The LEOs began swinging with their PR24s at him when they got close enough.

                  The first jury (83% white) agreed that King's failure to obey verbal orders justified his beatings, which resulted to the LA Riots when news reported the acquittal of the LEOs. The 2nd (mixed race) jury concluded the officers were not justified to use force. What spelled the difference is not the jury's race, but what was presented in trial. On the 2nd trial, the prosecution introduced the "swarm" technique of bringing down and subduing a suspect, which was taught at the Police Academy. The officers failed to use this strategy, and it was concluded that the LAPD violated their own policies.

                  The city of Los Angeles paid 3.8 million $$ to settle the case. This amount is indicative of negligent the LEOs had acted. In case you're not aware, there was one LEO who tried to walk up and stop the beatings. Her action had resulted in the Warren Commission Report to recommend increasing the number of female officers admitted into the LAPD. I've researched and can't find her name. Seems history had forgotten her. I only remember she was a California Highway Patrol officer. I'll edit this posting if I find her name.

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                  • #10
                    There are almost 800,000 full time State, Local and Special District Law Enforcement Officers in the United States (of which 100,000 are California Peace Officers) spread out over almost 18,000 separate Law Enforcement Agencies. That's not including almost 100,000 reserve/auxiliary officers and another 150,000 Federal Law Enforcement Officers.

                    That's more than 1 million people, most of them (like the country in general) are white folks. Unless you can give me the names and numbers of all 700,000 or so American cops who happen to be white, I don't think you're in a position to judge. Rodney King was one incident, how many GOOD things have LA or California cops done every day that didn't make the news?

                    I don't happen to be white (but I can empathize, I've watched my fellow campus cops who do happen to be white catch hell, to the point that I joke with my Chief that if I ever wake up one day and find out I'm white, I'd quit lol) , but I find it irritating when people make foolish generalizations about cops based on their race. LOL, it's reverse racial profiling, Why is it racial profiling is only wrong when the cops do it?
                    ~Black Caesar~
                    Corbier's Commandos

                    " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OMG_Ihatethisjob View Post
                      Perhaps your view is representative of a portion of the population. I'm in Los Angeles, and was affected by the Riots, which resulted when the LEOs were acquitted of the charges by an 83% white jury. The outcome was not the same when the LEOs were retried the 2nd time, by a mixed-raced jury. The Los Angeles Times published a poll after the 2nd trial, and people's opinion of the case was divided along racial lines. Latino, blacks, and orientals felt King was beaten because of his race, while whites felt the beating was justified because he refused to obey orders to get down on the ground.

                      If you had not seen the entire video, it starts out as the officers shouting verbal command for King to get down on the ground. King just stood there like he didn't speak English, but was not combative, as all the LEOs had written on their official report. The LEOs began swinging with their PR24s at him when they got close enough.

                      The first jury (83% white) agreed that King's failure to obey verbal orders justified his beatings, which resulted to the LA Riots when news reported the acquittal of the LEOs. The 2nd (mixed race) jury concluded the officers were not justified to use force. What spelled the difference is not the jury's race, but what was presented in trial. On the 2nd trial, the prosecution introduced the "swarm" technique of bringing down and subduing a suspect, which was taught at the Police Academy. The officers failed to use this strategy, and it was concluded that the LAPD violated their own policies.

                      The city of Los Angeles paid 3.8 million $$ to settle the case. This amount is indicative of negligent the LEOs had acted. In case you're not aware, there was one LEO who tried to walk up and stop the beatings. Her action had resulted in the Warren Commission Report to recommend increasing the number of female officers admitted into the LAPD. I've researched and can't find her name. Seems history had forgotten her. I only remember she was a California Highway Patrol officer. I'll edit this posting if I find her name.
                      I am exceptionally familiar with the incident and I have seen the tape, in its entirety. Being an African American police officer, I was drawn to the case and followed it closely.
                      I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
                      -Lieutenant Commander Data
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