Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can steel-toed boots survive being run over by a car?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Can steel-toed boots survive being run over by a car?

    Recently I've been working in a parking lot and was wondering: can the toe portion of steel-toed boots survive being run over by an average sized passenger car moving at low speeds? I hope so, because with the layout of the parking lot as it is I'm afraid someone's going to eventually have their foot run over.

  • #2
    Originally posted by bigshotceo View Post
    Recently I've been working in a parking lot and was wondering: can the toe portion of steel-toed boots survive being run over by an average sized passenger car moving at low speeds? I hope so, because with the layout of the parking lot as it is I'm afraid someone's going to eventually have their foot run over.
    I think they tested this on Mythbusters but I do not remember the outcome.
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

    Comment


    • #3
      In my non-scientific opinion, I think the steel cap is going to cut your toes off before it deforms.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
        In my non-scientific opinion, I think the steel cap is going to cut your toes off before it deforms.
        I remember that part from Mythbusters. It was a myth.
        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

        Comment


        • #5
          Anyone heard about boot with ceramic cap

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
            I remember that part from Mythbusters. It was a myth.
            Steel Toe Amputation:
            The Myth: When large weights drop on a steel capped shoe, do the steel caps meant to protect the foot buckle over and cut off your toes like a guillotine?

            Original Tests don't work as planned, the new ballistics gel they use is too rubbery to accurately measure the damage to a foot.

            They go to Plan B: Use clay to measure the crush since the new gel doesn't work right. The steel cap protects your foot under heavier weight than a regular shoe. So they go to 1 final test.

            The last test is with a heavy weight on a sharp egde, like the end of a heavy pipe. When it slams down, it deflects off the steel tip and lands higher up on the shoe, where there is no protection, cutting the shoe in half. This is the only case where the steel cap works against you, but the myth says the steel cap folds down and cuts off your toes; even in this case, the steel cap itself does not do the damage the myth claims.

            MYTH BUSTED
            "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

            Comment


            • #7
              The thing about this issue that gets me is this; we all have seen a soda can stepped on right? Well it doesn't "pop" back into shape like Tupperware does it? So who's to say that a 'heavy' enough weight (car/truck tire) will have the same result?

              The ceramic composite toes (I would think) would reach a point then crumble...maybe.

              My advice; step lively and be aware of your surroundings.
              ~Super Ninja Sniper~
              Corbier's Commandos

              Nemo me impune lacessit

              Grammical and Spelling errors may occur form time to time. Yoov bin worned

              Comment


              • #8
                The problem with a lot of the tests I've seen is that they either test the effect of a quick, sudden drop (such as a cinder block, which would hit the boot from the top and fall to the side) or how long the boot can hold the weight on top of it (such as if you couldn't get the block off right away). With a car running over your foot, it's kinda different. Rather than a sudden drop on the top, the tire would create a bell-shaped pressure curve going across your foot, with pressure along all points of the toe that would likely last about half a second for a slow moving vehicle. Also, the entire weight of the vehicle wouldn't be on your toe.

                Comment


                • #9
                  your toes

                  would be pretty much gone or close to it. We had a guy get run over with a Chevy Lumina in a shop I fixed cars in and he lost 3 of 5. Steel toes protect against industrial-type impact, i.e. dropping a hammer on your foot or something like that...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Steel toes in the winter will conduct the cold and your toes will stay numb. Also if I remember from a previous thread on this subject OSHA recommends plastic toe protectors. On the pro side you can get up to $3.000 per digit lost on the job.
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
                    http://www.boondocksaints.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'll keep my digits, thanks anyway
                      "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When I worked at Clarke-American (check printing company) I had about 1300 lbs of paper stock land on the steel toes of my boots. The drop was only from a pallet jack, so about 4-5", and of course it was a low speed drop, but my toes survived unscathed. It sucked being stuck standing there while the enept warehouse guy removed the pallet from my feet though! lol
                        I do security for work; I run into burning buildings for fun

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Dropping a dead weight onto your foot is going to be different than a moving object. As someone who has had his foot run over by his father a few times (no steel caps) as he drove off, bruising but nothing more than that. Steel caps - well it also depends on the brand, the style of boot, the surfaces (road base compared to concrete - dirt to grass) and I guess the speed of the car. I would not wish to experiement with this but I am sure some of you remember the tv stunts of someone having a car run over their chest or a bike over their stomachs and if you think of fire walking and hot coals - provided you keep moving, you will be fine. Any volunteers ?
                          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            My best advice is to avoid getting run over in the first place.

                            If you decide to require safety toed footwear, it is best to have non-metallic safety toes, especially if there are magnetometers(metal detectors) around. Steel toes make one of those go crazy!!
                            Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Long, silly story of the how and why, but, when I was in the USAF, my steeltoed boot survived being run over by an F-16. The one that was 'victimized' crushed about a quarter-inch during the low speed rollover.

                              I paid EXTRA close attention from then on during end-of-runway armings!
                              You can educate dumb, but you can't fix stupid.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X