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I survived supervising another day shift

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  • I survived supervising another day shift

    I'm a night worker. I sit at my desk from PM-AM supervising the patrols and sometimes even going out on a patrol or two myself just to get away from the phones and CCTV monitor.
    When my Site Supervisor needs a day off to get his heart checked out I get pulled to cover his shifts. Oh what a difference day shifts are.
    All those offices with their desks and cubicles which are empty when we do our walk throughs at 6:30 pm are now full of employees answering phones, typing on computers and rushing about. At the security desk in the guard shack my phone rings with callers looking for extensions I'm not used to dialing. At night nobody calls me to be connected to Human Resources or Payroll. On days that's only the beginning.
    But I handled everything which came my way. I'm the supervisor with a capital S.
    Early in the shift I got a call from an employee in the Administration Building. He was locked out of his office. I went into our key-box but couldn't find a key tagged for his door. I took about a dozen keys which I thought may have a chance of being the right key and tried them all to no avail. In the end a maintenance employee climbed through the ceiling and dropped down into the office and opened the door from inside.
    Around AM I got a call from a SO who was scheduled to work tonight. She woke up with a case of Pink Eye. Before she had even hung up with me I had picked up another phone, dialed the home number of another officer who I know works nights and arraigned for him to come in to work her shift. I grabbed the clipboard with our schedules and made the necessary changes. Crisis averted.
    That's pretty much the highlights of my day. Everything else was the usual routine of signing in trucks, telling visitors not to park RIGHT IN FRONT OF THE NO PARKING SIGNS and answering the phones.
    I had a off duty SO stop by and drop off a copy of his TWIC application receipt. He had driven to the New Orleans area TWIC center and had his finger prints and photo taken and paid his $132.50.
    I also had a plant employee who was injured this past week drop off paperwork from his orthopedic doctor. His foot had been crushed and trapped in the coupler between 2 rail cars. I had responded to the initial call for help, cut his boot off his foot with my EMT shears freeing his foot so I could bandage it and transport him to the hospital. I found out today that he has a broken foot and about 60 stitches but should be off his crutches in about 8 weeks. It was good to see him and learn that he would be OK. He seemed more concerned about the bloody mess he made in my medical van that night. I assured him that it was no problem and that's why we have bleach solution. Deconing is no big deal.
    Tomorrow I'm back on my night shifts. It's good to do something different sometimes and if I get pulled to work a day shift or two every few weeks then I'm sure I can handle whatever gets tossed my way.
    I'm going to bed.

    Steve
    Night, and some days, shift supervisor SO/EMT.
    Hospital Security Officer

  • #2
    See I told you - someone is going to snap you up and move you into a supervisor or site manager role. Always good to know you can cover these sudden emergencies when SHTF and that you are capable of taking charge when you need to be. Yes day shift is a different life and working nights occassionally at 1 corporate HQ, the other states would ring in asking for extensions and people which we had to say - sorry they went home 3 hours ago due to the time difference and being Friday afternoon.
    "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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    • #3
      Steve, wish I had you as a supervisor!!!!!!

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      • #4
        Yeah, despite the perception, nite shift's cool for SO's. You can really have Security on 3rd shift w/o too much trouble.

        First and Second shifts are circuses comparibly. The Supervisor is so busy doing repetitive tasks that he/she cannot concentrate on security: and the 'systems' are never 'that' fool-proof that I've seen.

        Plus you don't need to buy/wear sun-screen

        Even though you have to concentrate to do it, its still nice to keep your job skills competitive. Baby sitting on nite shift is quite different from the day shifts. You have time to think about what you say before you spit it out.

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        • #5
          Weekend / Sunday shifts are even better when you basically you and your partner are sole occupants of a site. Apart from occassional telephone calls or welfare checks - you have the day to yourself. With no interruptions, vehicular patrols together with miscellaneous paperwork were the only duties together with vehicle maintenance checking tyres, oil, water and fuel. 1 Sunday night I borrowed a site car to cover a burglary 30 minutes away and 1/2 way there had the OIL Light come on. Must have been easier to sign off on the vehicle check for 6 weeks in a row than do the actual 5 minute task.
          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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          • #6
            Originally posted by NRM_Oz View Post
            Weekend / Sunday shifts are even better when you basically you and your partner are sole occupants of a site. Apart from occassional telephone calls or welfare checks - you have the day to yourself. With no interruptions, vehicular patrols together with miscellaneous paperwork were the only duties together with vehicle maintenance checking tyres, oil, water and fuel. 1 Sunday night I borrowed a site car to cover a burglary 30 minutes away and 1/2 way there had the OIL Light come on. Must have been easier to sign off on the vehicle check for 6 weeks in a row than do the actual 5 minute task.
            How many sites does your company have that close to each other?
            "A good deed’s like pissing yourself in dark pants. Warm feeling but no one notices." - Jacob Taylor

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            • #7
              This was some years back and once onsite - you do not move as the client has paid for 3 bodies they are to get 3 bodies. I was fortunate that I then lived 4 minutes away from the regional command and control and working as a relief manager would be asked if I wanted to work a few odd shifts here and there. NOBODY gives up Sunday penalty rates and with travelling time, knew I would work 8 hours and be paid for 12.
              "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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