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  • Misdemeanors

    Does a misdemeanor automatically disqualify you for a position as a security officer? When I was 18 (2 years ago) I decided to go for a joy ride with a couple of my friends and got pulled over and I didnt have a drivers license. That has been the one and only time I have ever really broken the law, and yeah I know it was dumb and I regret it. Anywho Im looking to get married in June and wanted to try and get a better job and being that im currently going to school for criminal justice thought id get some experience being a security officer. Also they gave me summers probation for 2 years, will that also have any effect?

  • #2
    Originally posted by zeprider25 View Post
    Does a misdemeanor automatically disqualify you for a position as a security officer?
    I can't find one now but before BSIS re-design their web site, one of FAQ said, Misdemeanor "Can be" reason for denial.

    I think misdemeanor would be depend on what you've done.
    (Assault, thief or traffic)

    look #19 of this Firearm FAQ
    http://www.bsis.ca.gov/customer_serv...s_permit.shtml
    even firearm permit say Misdemeanor "Can be" deny.

    I think best bet would be e-mail to BSIS.
    I don't think they will answer you specific for your case, but they may answer as "misdemeanor also automatically denial" or "can be deny depend on type of conviction".

    http://www.bsis.ca.gov/about_us/contact_us.shtml
    Not many but few chauffeurs are armed to protect clients.

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    • #3
      In Australia it is 10 years unless it is something like a minor traffic offence - loss of licence or something similar. Either way you need to disclose it as if you are caught later you MAY be prosecuted for making a false and misleading declaration. Not sure about the USA, but I guess something similar would follow through.
      "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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      • #4
        Finding work as a security guard with a misdemeanor on your record should not be hard. Your biggest problem will be when you begin your career in criminal justice (I'm assuming you want to be a cop?) Even if you get your record expunged, law enforcement agencies still have access to previous arrest records and charges, so I'm not sure if this would be a problem or not.
        Last edited by Security; 01-29-2008, 01:29 AM.
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        • #5
          In California misdemeanors do not automatically disqualify you from security work or police work (with exceptions for weapons related offenses,violence realted or domestic violence related and a few others). I worked as a background investigator before I was promoted and I recomended one candiate who had a misdemeanor conviction for a job with our department.

          What counts when attempting to gain employment with a law enforcement agency is honesty during the hiring process, how much time has elaspsed between the conviction and your attempt to get hired, and what have you done to improve yourself since the conviction. Have you earned a college degree? Held a stable job? Paid you bills on time?

          I read in your post you stated you went joy riding without a license. Joy riding is a misdemeanor offense and driving without a license is a misdemeanor offense as well. Were you convicted of both offenses? Or are you using the term joy riding out of context?

          I wish you well in the pursuit of your goals.

          Stay Safe.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DeputyJ View Post
            In California misdemeanors do not automatically disqualify you from security work or police work (with exceptions for weapons related offenses,violence realted or domestic violence related and a few others). I worked as a background investigator before I was promoted and I recomended one candiate who had a misdemeanor conviction for a job with our department.

            What counts when attempting to gain employment with a law enforcement agency is honesty during the hiring process, how much time has elaspsed between the conviction and your attempt to get hired, and what have you done to improve yourself since the conviction. Have you earned a college degree? Held a stable job? Paid you bills on time? <snip>
            Ditto my own experience. Even the ajudicative process for secret clearances with the federal government provides some room for minor offenses. In fact, if I understand the nature of your offenses correctly, they might present less difficulty for you than something like really bad credit, a poor work history, plagiarism while in college, or domestic instability.

            Time makes a difference, as well. You're only 2 years out from these offenses. Youthful offenses take on less and less importance as you move away from them. The same is true of minor illicit drug use (not sales!). The longer it's been - presuming everything else in your life is "in order" - the better. Three to five years is fairly common for past issues to be treated as "old history".

            It's really the whole picture that says "Who is this person?", and what the backgrounder is looking for is:

            1. Evidence of moral character - honesty, honoring your obligations, respect for the law, respect for others, etc. Example - false statements on application or in reply to investigator followup questions, many traffic tickets (especially DUI or reckless driving), multiple traffic accidents where you were at fault, failure to pay court-ordered alimony or child support, dismissal or discipline from a job for dishonesty or theft, expulsion from university for plagiarism, etc.

            2. Evidence of emotional maturity - stable domestic relationships, stable work history, ability to handle criticism and correction constructively, fiscal responsibility, ability to form lasting friendships, etc. Example - domestic violence, many short-term jobs, getting into fights, failure to follow directives and policies on the job, accumulating unwise amounts of debt relative to income, evidence of impulsive behavioral tendencies.

            3. Lack of behavioral/lifestyle/psychiatric/relationship problems or issues that would make you unusually vulnerable to manipulation, corruption or subversion. Example - being a member of a skinhead group, posting sympathetic messages to forums that advocate discrimination or violence, belonging to ELF or other groups condoning unlawful "civil action", etc.

            4. The criminal record, of course, especially with respect to recent misdemeanors and any felonies. Usually, the criminal record will be reflective in some way of many of the problems noted in items #1 through 3 above.

            5. The civil record, especially with respect to credit, but any civil action for moral turpitude as well. Example - bankruptcy or being sued to recover embezzled funds, even if there was no criminal action taken.

            When issues arise in these areas, there are only some that automatically result in rejection of your application. For many others, especially those in the "distant past", there may be the opportunity to explain what happened, why it happened, and especially what corrective or mitigating actions you have taken to deal with these things.

            THE cardinal offense is any attempt to mislead the backgrounder or failure to fully disclose material matters. If you must err, do so on the side of too much disclosure. If a backgrounder knows what he's doing, he's probably going to find out about whatever you might try to hide, and if it doesn't come from you, that's BAD.

            Bottom line: These offenses you describe constitute one incident that happened when you were 18 and do not sound serious enough to preclude you from service PROVIDED you keep your life in order from here on.
            Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-29-2008, 10:24 AM.
            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

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            • #7
              If you work with some of the Security Officers I have worked with, you would know for a fact that it is certainly possible to be an S/O with a criminal history.
              "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
              "The Curve" 1998

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              • #8
                I was only charged with driving without a license. My main concern was obviously in regards to me becoming a LEO but I have 2 years before I finish my degree so in the short run I was worried about it effecting me right now with trying to get my guard card. Thanks alot guys.

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                • #9
                  Police Departments will consider the totality of the incident. They will thoroughly review the incident which could include speaking with the investigating officer and the prosecutor’s office. While there are concerned with the facts of your conviction, they will also want to know the who, when, what, where, why and how. And they will probably know those answers before they ask you about it.

                  They will watch the entire movie and the credits.
                  Last edited by Tennsix; 02-02-2008, 04:40 AM.
                  I believe I speak for everyone here sir, when I say, to Hell with our orders.
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                  • #10
                    In Arkansas, you would likely have to appear before the board along with your employer/prospective employer, and they would decide. I had a tech with a past marijuana bust, which they waived. At the same hearing, I saw them waive some stuff on a guard who had been in jail, but told his employer he could not work anywhere in which there were inmates present (work details, etc).

                    This applies to alarm techs, security guards, & PI's in AR.
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