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To the office first (a rant)

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  • bpdblue
    replied
    I should correct my previous statement from my earlier post here of my base pay of $45+ per hour.

    That $45+ included my actual base pay, plus 7% extra for having an advanced P.O.S.T. certificate, and 6% extra for working the graveyard shift. I just considered the $45+ as base pay because the 7% was permanent (unless it were to go up due to contract negotiations) and I always worked graveyards, so the extra 6% there was something I just expected.

    All other extra wages (like overtime for court, training, or other overtime, which paid at time and one half, or holidays (which we had 14 per year),which paid at double time, or acting watch commander pay, which was an extra 6% for each hour worked) were paid based on the $45+ per hour wage.

    In the last few years I worked there, I made over $100,000 per year, with the last year being near $120,000.

    The above wages, based on a 3% @ 50 retirement, allowed me to retire at 52, with an approx 81% rating, at $6600+ per month, with cost of living raises of up to 2% per year, with lifetime medical benefits.

    The one drawback to all this is as soon as I retired I ended up getting divorced (actually I'm still in the process as my lawyer nicely reminded me lately), and I have to give the ex $2750 after tax dollars every month for spousel and child support, and for the 25% of my pension that she gets for the rest of her life.

    Isn't marriage a great institution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Chaple
    replied
    I worked in Chicago for a short time after graduating. The company I worked for owned a condo for housing new hires/entertaining clients. It was a studio/efficiency which was about the size of my current homes living room and kitchen combined. They gave 11.5 times more for that studio than I gave for my house (again 2.5 the size) and yard. And I was only making about 2 dollars an hour more base pay. I lived and died by my bonuses and I really, really hate Chicago.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Some companies will lie to save costs

    In Australia if you are a static guard you are level 1 and a mobile patrol, CCTV office is a level 2 or level 3 if you have complex system. This could be $0.60 - $2.30 / hour difference and over 110 hours per fortnight could be $90 - $170.00 nett after penalties. Very few companies pay their staff the right levels but will brag about the competence of their staff.

    Not only is recognition important but financially it could be the cost of fuel, travel costs, part of the shopping bill or even the difference between child support for a single parent. Often people do leave the industry for the lack of a better career in an industrial role for more money, no shift work and ease of lifestyle - for the sake of that little difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • Limo LA
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Very important to consider the huge differences in cost of living when comparing salaries in different parts of the country.
    When I looked at ad on news paper in LA (I was not looking for security job, but anyway), many classified ad for Security company was $8.00 unarmed post, $9.50 armed patrol. with current Guard card or and firearm permit (it means experienced guard who already have guard card and weapon permit)
    BTW California minimum wage is now $8.00/hour

    I read other thread about Baton Rouge,
    http://forums.securityinfowatch.com/...ead.php?t=4470
    it looks same rate as Los Angeles Security pay.

    means, LA security get half the pay than other city (Except NY and Honolulu) consider of cost of living.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChuckyZ73
    replied
    I have decided I will not fight this issue with him but I am also going to refuse to drive my truck(which looks official) and drive my wifes Honda that gets 30 some miles per gallon unless he decides to pay me at least for gas traveling.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Yup - a condo that might cost $175K in Dallas could run you over a $million in the San Francisco Bay area...or in New York City (over a $million for around 750 square feet).

    ...and that doesn't count the differences that you would then have in property taxes and insurance due to the differences in valuation, which would also be proportionately higher. Taxes in Texas might be $2000 a year while they'd be upwards of $100,000 to $200,000 in the Bay area - in ADDITION to your mortgage.

    Very important to consider the huge differences in cost of living when comparing salaries in different parts of the country.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by Minneapolis Security View Post
    That $45.00/hr works out to $93,000+. Thats really high pay for a ploice officer. What city was this?

    You have to remember that cost of living is different in other places.

    This from Bestplaces.net for where my Sister lives and works as a Deputy Sheriff (Bay Area), to where I live when I plug in the numbers.

    She Doesn't make 93k, just using it as a comparison.

    To maintain the same standard of living, your salary of $93,000 in San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, California could decrease to $46,228 in Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, Texas.
    I make more as a Campus Police Officer in Dallas than 46k, not even counting my off duty security work. 93k for me if I moved to where my sister works would be a pay cut for me, for all intents and purposes. I just wouldn't be able to buy as much. My house in the Dallas Area is bigger than my sister's home in Oakland by a long shot, but she paid way more or hers.

    The Starting pay for a Berkley Campus Police officer is 66k. I thought that was great till I plugged in the numbers lol. The 66k from Berkley in California will buy you less stuff than the 38k starting pay with my Community College District in Texas.

    I don't know where BPD worked, I do know the Cost of living SUCKs in Cali.

    EDIT: This is the recruitment page for Oakland PD (not my sisters agency, but the PD for where she lives)

    $69,162 to $87,172 annual salary range ($62,245 while in Academy) plus shift differential, advanced degree / certification pay, and bilingual pay.
    Other benefits include paid vacation and sick, holiday, and military leave; medical, dental, and vision coverage. We are under the 3% at 50 retirement plan; the City of Oakland pays the 9% PERS contribution.
    Like I said, sounds good till you consider cost of living.
    Last edited by Black Caesar; 01-22-2008, 05:54 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
    Hey chucky,

    I don't want to be the bearer of bad news, but the threat your employer made to you (about taking away GOODIES that you get, you know, those little perks like playing on the computer) if you were going to want to get paid for your clock in and out time, happens in the police world too.

    In fact the same thing happened to me. I complained that I was getting dispatched to calls at 5 minutes before the shift change occurred, and that I would routinely get back to the station approx 30 minutes after my shift ended. (The last year of my police career was 2006, and I was making $45.00+ base pay per hour, so I was missing out on $33.75 in overtime every time this occurred.)

    Well it stirred things up pretty good, and one department supervisor went to verbal war with me over this. I must say the supervisor and I got along pretty well, so the battle was never personal, and my name was never brought up as the instigater, insted it was the old, "we have heard some rumblings about this issue," type of statements.

    The management position was exactly the same as your company, the old, "You guys get treated well, and it is rare that working over is required, and we give you perks like having ride-alongs, a little extra time for lunch if needed, letting you leave a little early from your shift if necessary,) and several more.

    Management said they would pay, but all perks would be gone.

    I thought about it, and I decided that I did not want to reck the offerings by the department for the other officers, so I let it be known that I was withdrawing my complaint.

    I knew I would be leaving the department some day soon, but I would leave everyone still there with baggage from my complaint.

    It worked out well enough for everyone though, as my hold overs on last minute calls decreased significantly, and management appreciated that an issue that could have gotten ugly didn't occur at all.
    That $45.00/hr works out to $93,000+. Thats really high pay for a ploice officer. What city was this?

    Leave a comment:


  • bpdblue
    replied
    Hey chucky,

    I don't want to be the bearer of bad news, but the threat your employer made to you (about taking away GOODIES that you get, you know, those little perks like playing on the computer) if you were going to want to get paid for your clock in and out time, happens in the police world too.

    In fact the same thing happened to me. I complained that I was getting dispatched to calls at 5 minutes before the shift change occurred, and that I would routinely get back to the station approx 30 minutes after my shift ended. (The last year of my police career was 2006, and I was making $45.00+ base pay per hour, so I was missing out on $33.75 in overtime every time this occurred.)

    Well it stirred things up pretty good, and one department supervisor went to verbal war with me over this. I must say the supervisor and I got along pretty well, so the battle was never personal, and my name was never brought up as the instigater, insted it was the old, "we have heard some rumblings about this issue," type of statements.

    The management position was exactly the same as your company, the old, "You guys get treated well, and it is rare that working over is required, and we give you perks like having ride-alongs, a little extra time for lunch if needed, letting you leave a little early from your shift if necessary,) and several more.

    Management said they would pay, but all perks would be gone.

    I thought about it, and I decided that I did not want to reck the offerings by the department for the other officers, so I let it be known that I was withdrawing my complaint.

    I knew I would be leaving the department some day soon, but I would leave everyone still there with baggage from my complaint.

    It worked out well enough for everyone though, as my hold overs on last minute calls decreased significantly, and management appreciated that an issue that could have gotten ugly didn't occur at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    Chucky,

    I somewhat took the liberty of addressing this issue with the Texas Workforce Commission... I EXCLUDED any and all information that would or could be directed towards anyone in particular so as to provide as much protection to you and our co-workers....

    Here is what I got in my inbox a few mins ago;

    Mr. X



    Thank you for your message to the Texas Workforce Commission (TWC). Your inquiry was forwarded to TWC's Labor Law section for our review and response. We administer the Texas Payday Law which assists employees with the recovery of unpaid wages.

    According to the Texas Payday Law, an employer is obligated to pay wages for all time worked, in accordance with the pay-rate agreed upon by the parties and on the posted, scheduled paydays. The Texas Payday Law does not specifically address the issue of driving time. However, the U. S. Department of Labor (DOL) does address the issue of "compensable time." Compensable time is normally defined as "all the time during which an employee is necessarily required to be on the employer's premises, on duty or at a prescribed work place.'' Generally, these are hours for which the employer must pay an employee. For additional information on this issue, you may want to contact DOL's Wage and Hour Division at 1-866-4-US-WAGE or review their website at www.dol.gov/esa/whd.

    This publication specifically addressed the issue in question here http://www.dol.gov/esa/regs/compliance/whd/whdfs22.pdf .

    If the information you receive from DOL leads you to believe you are due wages, you have the right to file a wage claim with TWC. Your claim will be investigated under the provisions of the Texas Payday Law. Please note that under the current law, a wage claim must be filed before we can make a decision regarding the specific scenario noted in your inquiry.

    FILING A WAGE CLAIM: Our web page at http://www.texasworkforce.org/ui/lablaw/lablaw.html offers detailed information about the Texas Payday Law, and there is a downloadable claim form at http://www.twc.state.tx.us/ui/lablaw/ll1.pdf. Wage claim forms are also available at most full-service Texas Workforce Centers. The Texas Payday Law states that the employee who files a wage claim must do so within 180 days after the date the contested wages were due for payment.

    MAILING ADDRESS: You must submit the wage claim form by regular mail to: TWC Labor Law Section, Suite 110, 101 East 15th Street, Austin, Texas 78778. You can send any additional information, questions, or correspondence to the Labor Law Section by fax to 512-475-3025, or by regular mail to the address above. We regret that currently we do not handle claim correspondence or status information by e-mail.

    QUESTIONS: If you have questions, please call our Labor Law Section’s Public Information line toll-free at 1-800-832-9243/TDD 800-735-2989 (within Texas only), or call the main number 1-(512) 475-2670. Office hours are 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. After office hours, our automated telephone system can answer many of your questions.



    Thank you again for contacting TWC.


    David Mortimore
    Program Supervisor
    Texas Workforce Commission
    Labor Law Section
    101 E. 15th Street Ste. 124T
    Austin, TX 78778
    Additionally, my Aunt is an Enrolled Agent (more than a CPA, she can represent her clients in Tax Court if need be) I recall a conversation with her about mileage being paid to an employee who is required to use his/her own vehicle for company duties... I could be off and forgetting something maybe it's a deduction.... Im a little foggy on that as of now.

    So, untill you get hired on with a PD/SO move on or press him...

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    What they need is this http://www.jobclock.com/

    If you are using any kind of guard tour system, you already have the tools needed, but otherwise this would work great. It's designed for jobsites, and I see no real difference in a security post.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Seems like this clown has been painted into a corner and now he is wanting to get nasty by threatening the little things. I wonder if your workplace safety rules are as strict as ours here and we do have state inspectors who react to allegations of dangerous worksites.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChuckyZ73
    replied
    I start the police academy next month and I don't want to be job hoping around like I had done before this company. I am stuck here until I can get on a PD.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    That owner sounds like a spoiled child. He'll pay you the money you are due, but then out of spite he will bust your chops over what he perceives as the extra perks on your job?

    What does the client permit? Does the client authorize guards leaving post and being on the computer?

    I agree with BHR, it is probably time to start looking for a better gig.

    Leave a comment:


  • junkyarddog
    replied
    Where I work, every S/O calls the supervisor when they actually start their shift, are on duty. They have to call from the phone at the post.

    No forms or reports? Never heard of that one before.

    Leave a comment:

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