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  • craig333
    replied
    I even had one of my bosses yell at me for wearing a black undershirt. It might be mistaken for a vest. I"ll be wearing it to the graveyard shift at the casino tonight. Don't expect the boss to stop by. And yes, I'll leave this company, just waiting to hear back about another position.

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  • Chucky
    replied
    Originally posted by Curtis Baillie View Post
    I beg to differ - flak vests worked.
    I concur. Saved my butt a couple of times. Just wished they were twenty pounds lighter. Just for the record I don't know of anyone that sat on their helmet while flying to prevent flak from as stated in the movie Apocalypse Now severing their pvt parts. Most as I did sat on their flak jacket while 500 feet or more.
    Speaking of movies most misinformation comes from them. Robert Duval standing on the hot beach spouting about napalm, John Wayne standing in the middle of a fire fight barking orders and Mel Gibson standing during a very close range fire fight barking orders while all his men are prone shooting and dyeing around him. Lets see in real life if you are the VC then who would you shoot first?? Hmmmm
    Last edited by Chucky; 01-31-2008, 09:35 PM.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Won't argue there Curtis - but my point was, there is limited coverage so unless we are thinking of the kevlar coats from Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man movie (yes I know it is bogus), it does not mean anyone is invincible and I do know VIP's who have refused to wear them due to comfort factors or ego in high risk environments. Now if I was in an active area, I would be wearing everything I could as a 2nd chance - even the flak underpants WWII fighter crews had the option of wearing (I never said how they had a pitstop mid flight).

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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    I beg to differ - flak vests worked.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Yes vests can give you a false sense of security and ask anyone who was a Huey pilot and find their flak vests were uses as seat cushions since they were useless if you copped a shot in the head and with heavy AA fire, the undercarriage presented a far bigger target to enermy fire. As I was told working CPP - you are vulnerable taking a shower, pitstop and getting dressed or getting in and out of a motorvehicle. Most companies will find an excuse to cover themselves for their HR decisions and in our industry, often the ego gets in the way of the decision.

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  • msofin
    replied
    I was finally able to speak with an officer from OSHA. He informed me that currently ballistic vests are outside of their jurisdiction. He encouraged me to get in contact with licensing board for the state. I started with my Lethal Weapons Training instrutor who referred me to the The Municipal Police Officer's Education and Training Commission (MPOETC), who heads up training for armed security.

    At this point, if I choose to file a lawsuit against the company it will be be based on the fact that I was suspended for refusing to remove my shirt for the supervisor.

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  • ValleyOne
    replied
    OK, WTH... Here's my thoughts;

    1) I'm thinking this Lt. has a rather narrow field of view towards security. He SHOULD know the periphiral (sp?) advantages to wearing a vest. Personally, I would've told him it was a dual threat vest (STAB/Ballistic) and go on to state the fact that more people are assualted with edged weapons than shot. After all as a former LEO he would know and understand. If I had one, somethings you can bluff. That brings us to his narrow view on security... "It's JUST security you don't need a vest...."

    2) Rats don't jump ship without a good reason... If the entire command staff all left within a similar time frame I'd already be filling out applications else where.

    But hindsight is always 20/20... Don't beat yourself up, I don't recall the memner who mentioned it (several times) but the issue of boxer vs. briefs it all to clear.



    Good on you for standing your ground...

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  • DMS 525
    replied
    My .02:

    My biggest fear of those wearing body armor is that they would get the false sense of security in thinking they can't be injured, and perhaps take more foolish chances. Has happened in the past. But for the majority of us(myself included), we wear it in a passive protective role, for what we can't see coming or what is unexpected. I wore my vest for years, and all it saved me from was when someone tried to whap me with a beer bottle between the shoulder blades, but at least it protected me from something!

    Sounds like your new LT is a boy wonder who moved up in a quick hurry. Reading on, I agree with the rest, in that you just ought to tell that company to blow it out their whazoo, and seek employment elsewhere. They'll make fools out of themselves in no time at all. BTDT.

    FYI: So many private security agencies, especially those nationwide ones, actually do not give a tinker's damn about the safety, professionalism, or image of their employees. All they care about are high profit margins, and count on a 300% turnover every year to keep wages low and profits up. As a result, all you get are these bozos who give security the bad rap it gets. A never ending vicious cycle.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    This type of thinking is why people needed unions in the first place. Someone will hire this guy if he goes through with this. Someone either needs a warm body, or needs a high speed tacticool operator. Either that, or someone just needs a guy with the balls to stand up for what is right.

    I would prefer a guy who stands up to people, I know I can put him places that other guards would cave in and do things that I don't want them doing. Things that could get me litigated into next year, things that could get me thrown in jail.
    No need for you to get bent out of shape - it was simply an observation, one that you clearly, right or wrong, don't share.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
    Ever hear the expression: "Won the battle but lost the war"

    If you pursue this case legally, other security companies may shy away from hiring you out of fear from possible litigation. Let's assume you win and are reinstated with back wages. Will you be happy working for a company that doesn't want or appreciate you?

    If you are unhappy and decide to find other security employment will anyone hire you? (Falsely labeled as a trouble maker, boat rocker, etc.)

    Sometimes it's better to cut your losses and move on.
    This type of thinking is why people needed unions in the first place. Someone will hire this guy if he goes through with this. Someone either needs a warm body, or needs a high speed tacticool operator. Either that, or someone just needs a guy with the balls to stand up for what is right.

    I would prefer a guy who stands up to people, I know I can put him places that other guards would cave in and do things that I don't want them doing. Things that could get me litigated into next year, things that could get me thrown in jail.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Just a thought

    Ever hear the expression: "Won the battle but lost the war"

    If you pursue this case legally, other security companies may shy away from hiring you out of fear from possible litigation. Let's assume you win and are reinstated with back wages. Will you be happy working for a company that doesn't want or appreciate you?

    If you are unhappy and decide to find other security employment will anyone hire you? (Falsely labeled as a trouble maker, boat rocker, etc.)

    Sometimes it's better to cut your losses and move on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Security Leader
    replied
    What state are you in?

    And what was the exact reason you were terminated?

    Leave a comment:


  • msofin
    replied
    the insanity!

    update (green font, my thoughts, opinions, etc...):

    I went in to get my pay check today, the operations manager greets me and asks what he can do for me. I tell him I'm there to pick my pay check up. He asks if I have my uniforms to return. Of course I don't the last news was my suspension. The ops. manager tells me I've been relieved of my duty and will not be issued a check until the uniforms are returned. I just askflat out ask him, 'Am I terminated?'. He says "hmm, yes.' I go home, return with the uniforms, the ops. manager in the hall way and tells me to go back to the office, the acting Security Director will take care of you. This guy calls the custodial supervisor in to get me my check. While I'm waiting I ask the director why I was terminated, he replies "you haven't been termited yet, you're indefinetly suspended until an investigation is complete.". It's been a week since I was suspended and they still haven't completed the investigation yet. I told him what the ops. manager told me. He started to go on about the investigation while staring at the desk behind his. This really did add a little salt in my 'wounds', I just looked at him and said "please look at me". I don't think he cared for that very much. I asked him who was investigating. All he would tell me is someone from Tennessee (The 'corporate ' office). I also asked him for the name of the area manager for the company, he looks at me with the expression of a dumb founded fool and doesn't say a thing. I look at him and said ina a you got to be kidding me voice, "you don't even know who are area manager is?". Honestly, how can you be in a supervisory position and not know who is above you in the chain of command?
    The ops. manager came in and I asked him who the area manager was. He wasn't happy but did tell me the man's name along with the VP for who leads up security. He went on to tell me the VP was the same man i spoke to when I called the company before. I told him, "I did not speak with him, the only person I spoke with was the staff assistant.". I left with my pay check.

    I still haven't heard from OSHA yet, I will call the area office on Monday. If I still can't get a hold of the officer there I will try the national call center. It is amazing that a 'national' company is this disorganized. Not even TWC is this bad! It looks like I might luck out, CS woman who likes me called the director who hired me and brought him up to date on my situation. He is back with Allied at a very good site adn had her pass his cell No. to me as he wants to bring me on at his new site. I will be in touch with him, hopefully I will back with Allied soon. I certainly will continue to see what I can do, as far as legal action goes, with my situation with ERMC.

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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Bill - I use a variety of sources including computerized police crime reports, (if the area PD is large enough), and I use Cap Index. The client pays.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Curt, you have written well.
    Nothing beats a comprehensive security survey, I mean comprehensive site specific survey, conducted by people who know what they are doing. Avoid the GSA model at all costs. GSA has a survey format wherein one size fits all. If Building A has a low profile, they then reason such will apply to Buildings B thru Z.
    The survey must be appended if an event takes place. If the initial survey was done in January 2007 then one should be conducted prior to the end of January 2008.
    The trick is who picks up the tab for these surveys?
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:

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