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  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Dog View Post
    I've been only lurking for the past few weeks, but I just gotta say how ticked off this story makes me.

    It was nothing but blatant disrespect on those cops part to come onto your jurisdiction in the first place without so much as a call or heads up. Had it been me I would've given them a friendly reminder that they were on my turf and I could've handled the interview. And it would've been followed up by the not so friendly reminder that if they ever pulled a stunt like that again I would shove those don't-mean-nothing badges so far up their fourth point of contact, they would be able to feel them scrape along the back of their teeth.
    Oh I am so sure you would.

    BTW: Interesting to read the comments of the old members from long ago, six plus years who were good people
    had good things to say, but have left us

    Leave a comment:


  • SpecialAgentKC
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Dog View Post
    Bad for or not, wrongdoing needs to be acknowledged and dealt with. Though it is an extreme example, if you found out your neighbor was a nazi war criminal in hiding, would you do anything about it? I mean, WWII was 70 years ago so why bring up long dead issues, right? Yeah, I didn't think so. You'd deal with it the same as how I'm dealing with it now.

    And, for the record, no LE bias or jealously on my part. I deal with scum day in and day out and have proven myself to my peers and those I protect.
    Though I'm thoroughly convinced you need to "get a grip" and could avail myself of the opportunity to respond to that last and most absurd post, I'll take my own best and recurring advice: "Don't feed the troll". Out. --K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by SpecialAgentKC View Post
    Heads up, hero, it is generally considered bad form to resurrect long dead threads...even when they provide you an opportunity to spout venom against LE personnel. You seemingly have a penchant for anti-police posts. However, it comes off more as envy, in my view. The latter portion of your post is pure fantasy. . . . You'd take on three trained, uniformed cops? "Sounds legit". --K.
    Bad for or not, wrongdoing needs to be acknowledged and dealt with. Though it is an extreme example, if you found out your neighbor was a nazi war criminal in hiding, would you do anything about it? I mean, WWII was 70 years ago so why bring up long dead issues, right? Yeah, I didn't think so. You'd deal with it the same as how I'm dealing with it now.

    And, for the record, no LE bias or jealously on my part. I deal with scum day in and day out and have proven myself to my peers and those I protect.

    Leave a comment:


  • SpecialAgentKC
    replied
    Originally posted by Wild Dog View Post
    I've been only lurking for the past few weeks, but I just gotta say how ticked off this story makes me.

    It was nothing but blatant disrespect on those cops part to come onto your jurisdiction in the first place without so much as a call or heads up. Had it been me I would've given them a friendly reminder that they were on my turf and I could've handled the interview. And it would've been followed up by the not so friendly reminder that if they ever pulled a stunt like that again I would shove those don't-mean-nothing badges so far up their fourth point of contact, they would be able to feel them scrape along the back of their teeth.
    Heads up, hero, it is generally considered bad form to resurrect long dead threads...even when they provide you an opportunity to spout venom against LE personnel. You seemingly have a penchant for anti-police posts. However, it comes off more as envy, in my view. The latter portion of your post is pure fantasy. . . . You'd take on three trained, uniformed cops? "Sounds legit". --K.

    Leave a comment:


  • Wild Dog
    replied
    Originally posted by Justice_Hound View Post
    So... I had a really crazy experience today that I want to discuss here on this forum. I am currently employed as a Retail Loss Prevention Manager for a sporting goods store. Today, three State Troopers came into my store to make contact with a sales associate that was named as a witness to a crime. I normally don't have any issues with any law enforcement in my community but today made me stop and think.

    These troopers were only there to talk to this associate as a witness (she didn't name herself as victim and they were not theirr to arrest her) and they ignored challenges by three employees as they entered the non- public area of the store (clearly marked as "employees only"). When they made contact with the associate to ask her questions she informed them that she was on the clock and needed to go punch off the time clock before she talked to them. The lead trooper refused and told her to stay put and talk to them. After a few moments the troopers decided that they needed more privacy than what the backstock offered and made their way down the hallway to the first open office door. That first open door happened to be my office. One of my new LP Officers was in my office at the time writing a report and they told him to leave! My officer then left the office and called to advise me of the situation. About a minute later I arrived at my office to find the associate sitting behind my desk (which is wrong anyways because there was confidential paperwork on my desk and associates are not allowed in the Security Department or LP managers office) and the door locked. When I rapped on the glass I was told through the door to go away because they needed privacy to talk to the associate. Of course, my keys are sitting on my desk so I could open the door. I then put my badge up to the glass and tapped again. After this one of the troopers came to the door and let me in. I was then told that I had an attitude and that I was not allowed to hear this conversation. And then I was told to leave or I would be subject offical action.

    Well, needless to say I was mad. You do not come on to closed private property and "commandeer" the security manager's office without legal cause.

    What would you have done?
    I've been only lurking for the past few weeks, but I just gotta say how ticked off this story makes me.

    It was nothing but blatant disrespect on those cops part to come onto your jurisdiction in the first place without so much as a call or heads up. Had it been me I would've given them a friendly reminder that they were on my turf and I could've handled the interview. And it would've been followed up by the not so friendly reminder that if they ever pulled a stunt like that again I would shove those don't-mean-nothing badges so far up their fourth point of contact, they would be able to feel them scrape along the back of their teeth.

    Leave a comment:


  • bpdblue
    replied
    The troopers acted wrongly!

    You need to make the FORMAL complaint to the actual department the troopers work for. I agree, with what you stated in your post, the troopers acted wrongly.

    As for demanding the use of the office, or car, in an actual emergency, the trooper has the authority to do most things, including take the car, order you out of your business, ect, or you are most likely to be arrested.

    But just to interview someone, there is no emergency, and no apparent right of the trooper to force you out.

    Send letters to your state legislature, the mayor or governmental agency for your area, write your local newspaper, and make sure to CC all letters sent to all of these groups to the commanding officers of the troopers.

    This type of action by the troopers was regretable, and as a retired police officer, I believed that providing the best service possible to the public was very high on my job priorities (this means keeping the public as happy as I could, knowing that most of the people I dealt with only call the police when they are truly upset anyway), and these troopers obviously did not have that spirit the day this incident occurred.

    So, I will say I am SORRY for the way law enforcement failed you that day, and that I hope the troopers involved get the punishment they deserve for their actions. They are PUBLIC SERVENTS, and should remember that.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    When I was with CDF there was a similar law on the books about them asking for citizens help on fires. That went way way back. Even though it was on the books they said there was no way they'd ever actually do that in this day and age.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky View Post
    As far as I know a cop in a real emergency can commandeer your car after showing ID. Now that would really Piss me off and I would most likely tell him to F off and hit the gas. Imagine the fun you would have if he trashed your car or killed a pedestrian and you had to go through all the red tape to get reimbursed. I'm sure your insurance company would not be to happy.

    In your case the only thing that was hurt was your pride and when the trooper stepped out you should have asked him remove the employee from your desk as confidential info was on top.
    Most states have a law that says if commanded by a leo to assist you must assist them or face arrest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dayanx
    replied
    probably over something simple like a traffic accident. For every 50 really great LEOs theres bound to be 4 or 5 wingnuts that think they're Judge Dredd.

    Mainly it's due to stress- but sometimes, the WRONG people are in the job.

    Leave a comment:


  • integrator97
    replied
    Sounds like a walking talking rectum to me.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chucky
    replied
    As far as I know a cop in a real emergency can commandeer your car after showing ID. Now that would really Piss me off and I would most likely tell him to F off and hit the gas. Imagine the fun you would have if he trashed your car or killed a pedestrian and you had to go through all the red tape to get reimbursed. I'm sure your insurance company would not be to happy.

    In your case the only thing that was hurt was your pride and when the trooper stepped out you should have asked him remove the employee from your desk as confidential info was on top.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    I agree with suggestion to file a formal complaint - this trooper is too big for his britches.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    When I worked LP, we kept the door locked and closed at all times. There was no reason, that the door needed to be open, unless there were several officers in the LP office locking someone up.

    Now, what I would have done in this situation was, showed credentials before tapping on the window. They (the troops) don't have a clue who you are (which is why they opened the door after you showed your badge). Then I would have asked, what's going on and if they wanted privacy, I would have simply explained that she is sittin on my chair, behind my desk, which has confidential forms..etc. However, i'd be more than happy to show you a room where you can have the privacy you need. Attitude, presentation is key and can make things easier.

    My B partner is a Fed, and we (a mutual friend thats a cop) were discussing how Fed's take over situations. Most just show up and say.. we're Fed's, we're taking over as simple as that. When you're on "official" duty, you're not worried about certain things. You're there to get what you need, and if this associate was a witness to a serious case, than I can understand their behavior. However, some cops are Arses by nature/birth.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Where I once worked, I had the LP office plus my office off that, so I had a seperate room to secure my information and files. Sadly I had a snooping LPS with another junior LPM who were so both incompetent that they needed to copy templates, emails and risk assessments to justify their wages. Eventually commandeered a filing cabinet and locked it up with a padlock that had the only key on my ID tag. I suggest you try something similar to keep prying eyes away from what does not need to be seen.

    By law including industrial relations, I am not permitted to leave any confidential papers unattended on my desk or in an unsecured environment without my presence. I had a large sliding cabinet desk that I would dump any working papers into and secured it before locking my office. Nothing worse than have hundreds of papers spread out and someone wanting your attention immediately so you need to pack it up and lock it away - hence the cabinet the size of a drafting table.

    NEVER leave your keys unattended as you never know WHAT happens behind your back with them. I had an LPO switch his restricted office key to a spare master key - when he was confronted, he lied but admitted later what he did. I fired him within the hour (he was a thief and I had a file on him ready for interview but he did it for us). If I remain where I am, I will fit a biometric office door lock to restrict key issues, as No-1 has access to my office apart from me (only key is with my ID card). No cleaners, Building Staff or even my CEO has access to the office as 1 refuse to let anyone have access to my office under any circumstances.
    Last edited by NRM_Oz; 01-12-2008, 12:53 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jbaerbock
    replied
    I personally in that situation would have gotten on the phone right away and contacted their supers. Otherwise you did really all you can do. Sadly too many LEO's think they are the King of anywhere they go. They are mistaken in this and I believe there is a federal law barring something like this unless they have a warrant. Private property is truly private, sadly sometimes you have to fight for this right. Just another issue where the government is overbearing and thinks they can do anything.

    Leave a comment:

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