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  • How to create a training class.

    I am working on creating a "BHR Security Training Class" that will cover some basic material that I think needs to be covered. We, as proprietary guards, receive 0 training in the security field, and I feel some stuff needs to be gone over. I plan to have this cover:

    - Property Laws
    - Basic Security Laws
    - Interview Techniques
    - Pat-downs/Searches
    - Use of Force Continuum
    - Tactical techniques
    - BHR Security Considerations (Such as closing curtains, checking certain doors, etc...)

    This is the first training docket I've ever worked on putting together. Im wondering, for those of you that have done something similar, what else should I add, or go over, and what would be the steps to getting it approved?
    "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
    "The Curve" 1998

  • #2
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
    I am working on creating a "BHR Security Training Class" that will cover some basic material that I think needs to be covered. We, as proprietary guards, receive 0 training in the security field, and I feel some stuff needs to be gone over. I plan to have this cover:

    - Property Laws
    - Basic Security Laws
    - Interview Techniques
    - Pat-downs/Searches
    - Use of Force Continuum
    - Tactical techniques
    - BHR Security Considerations (Such as closing curtains, checking certain doors, etc...)

    This is the first training docket I've ever worked on putting together. Im wondering, for those of you that have done something similar, what else should I add, or go over, and what would be the steps to getting it approved?
    You don't mention how much time you have available, so it's difficult to advise you. Many of your topics could be anything from "skim the surface" to something more. They say that "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing", and that is true for some of the topics on your list, that's for sure. Other topics really require both presentation of principles and practical exercises.

    Unfortunately, we live in a day when inadequate training can actually present more liability than no training (and no job expectations) at all. I would be concerned about your idea if you do not have some sort of training credentials yourself. You might want to pick up a good book on adult training methods to familiarize yourself with the scope of the issues. "Trainer Basics" by George Piskurich from ASTD (American Society for Training & Development) is inexpensive and very good, plus it's part of the ASTD series on training if you decide you'd like to learn more in depth.

    This last problem (training credentials) can be somewhat mitigated if you use "authoritative sources". Since your venue is healthcare, you should consider tailoring a "custom" program using material taken from the IAHSS basic security textbook, for instance, plus maybe some sections from the IFPO basic security text on the more general security topics. These sources are "recognized", at least to some degree.

    One thing I'd include is fire extinguisher training, which the fire department is often glad to provide for nothing. It's surprising how many people don't know the proper extinguisher to use for a particular type of fire, or even how to "arm" and then use an extinguisher effectively. Ditto, basic training on the facility's built-in fire alarm and extinguishing systems.

    And, of course, basic first aid with CPR and defibrillator can be made part of your program without you actually having to provide it. The Red Cross is happy to do so, and is very good about figuring out how to work first aid training around employees' work schedules.

    I presume that "tactical techniques" would include such things as building evacuation, the notification system, and "special problems" that a behavioral health facility encounters with patients and family.

    I applaud your efforts and sincerely wish you good luck!
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-25-2007, 11:22 AM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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    • #3
      SecTrainer has a good idea in asking the FD to put on a fire extinguisher class for you. Don't overlook opportunities for free expert training!
      When I held my last training class, I invited the local PD to present their POST approved Meth program. My POST certified officers got credit for the class, my other officers got some good training, and the cops got to meet our officers and get to know them a bit. This was a great way to build rapport with the police dept.
      For vulnerable adult training, we received training from the Sheriff's Dept lead investigator for vulnerable adult cases. Again, through the class, we built some rapport with the Sheriff's office.
      And for helicopter landing training, North Air Care flies to the hospital and provides a class. They even have a drawing for rides in the chopper after the class!
      FEMA requires NIMS certification for certain positions in health care, law enforcement, fire, EMS, etc. Your officers can get this training free from the FEMA online learning web site.
      Check with the education dept at your facility. One of our hospitals gives us access to their in-house computer-based training. Between rounds my officers receive training in all kinds of subjects; safety, bio-hazards, emergency procedures, etc. The hospital training dept even assigns new lessons and let's me know when each officer has completed them!

      Good Luck!
      Last edited by Badge714; 12-26-2007, 11:12 AM.
      "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

      Comment


      • #4
        There are a few generic training videos you probably can purchase on line. Since you are in a hospital, I will strongly suggest you arrange for your officers to complete the Red Cross training program "Disease Transmition Prevention" in addition to basic CPR and First Aid.
        Would your hospital pay for you to become a certified instructor in baton (MEB), handcuffs (PATH), OC Spray (OCAT), etc...
        Contact the companies that manufacture the fire alarm and supresion systems. They, more than likely, already have developed educational materials regarding their products that would be of use to you and your officers.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
          I am working on creating a "BHR Security Training Class" that will cover some basic material that I think needs to be covered. We, as proprietary guards, receive 0 training in the security field, and I feel some stuff needs to be gone over. I plan to have this cover:

          - Property Laws
          - Basic Security Laws
          - Interview Techniques
          - Pat-downs/Searches
          - Use of Force Continuum
          - Tactical techniques
          - BHR Security Considerations (Such as closing curtains, checking certain doors, etc...)

          This is the first training docket I've ever worked on putting together. Im wondering, for those of you that have done something similar, what else should I add, or go over, and what would be the steps to getting it approved?
          As far as content is concerned, I would emphasize effective observation and documentation (esp report writing) techniques. The two issues I see more than anything are poor report writing (especially shift-logs), and a failure to report incidents in a timely and accurate way.
          formerly C&A

          Comment


          • #6
            How about covering appropriate radio/phone usage, protocol & equipment care?
            "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

            Comment


            • #7
              I would say to definitely tailor it to your specific facility for the best chance of getting it approved by management.

              If the staff doesn't conduct pat downs, make arrests, or interview suspects, the administration might very well see the training as nothing more than fluff.

              If I recall correctly, your facility does not authorize any gear. So, they may look at training on the use of force continuum to be useless as well.

              Organizations are interested in getting a solid return on their investment. By tailoring the training to events that take place or could reasonably take place at your facility, you will get their attention a lot sooner.

              Also, many of the areas that you speak of would be best served by having certified training as opposed to merely a guy that works there that has some knowledge.

              I am not saying that you wouldn't be a good trainer, but by conducting the training you invite a certain amount of liability exposure on to yourself. This is especially the case in areas that you are not certified.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
                I am not saying that you wouldn't be a good trainer, but by conducting the training you invite a certain amount of liability exposure on to yourself. This is especially the case in areas that you are not certified.
                I am working on becoming a certified instructor in a lot of stuff I plan to go over.
                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                "The Curve" 1998

                Comment


                • #9
                  ASIS training guidelines:
                  http://www.asisonline.org/guidelines...ivatefinal.pdf

                  Basic Training courses and videos I've been able to find online:


                  Listrom & Associates, LLC SO training programs:
                  http://www.listromcorp.com/
                  Effective Security Officer's Training Manual, Second Edition (Paperback):
                  http://www.amazon.com/Effective-Secu.../dp/0750670908
                  CSS training:
                  http://www.gocss.com/training.htm
                  Professional Security training Network:
                  http://www.twlk.com/security/pstn_home.aspx
                  Security in the Health Care Environment:
                  http://books.google.com/books?id=FzK...Ipb1_C36DFXgjk

                  Equipment certifications (programs used by the AlliedBarton training department)

                  Baton training:
                  http://www.armortrainingacademy.com/bp/

                  OC spray training:
                  http://www.personalsafetytraining.com/ocat.php

                  Handcuff training:
                  http://www.personalsafetytraining.com/path.php

                  Comment

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