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  • Alaska Security
    replied
    KL2BY here, with the advent of IRLP/APRS the computer is playing more of a role in the amateur realm.

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  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
    Maelstrom, you a ham?
    KC5SAS here.
    Nah... an-almost-was

    I was heavily in to the Citizen's Band HF/UHF gear from '87 ~ '02, building & experimenting with antennas/configurations & DXing... during it's local 'heyday' we conducted fox-hunts on weekends and this is when my contacts with the local Amateur Radio Club assisted me locating the specification/design for an amplified FSM (which gave an edge in fox-hunting), I later turned the construction skills acquired through that hobby towards scanner antenna's & Digital UHF TV antennas

    Somewhere after that the 'local calibre' of enthusiasts went to hell in a hand basket, so I turned my interests towards the internet & PCs in general... I notice that the levels of license have since been altered to help entice those not interested in morse (or the lower HF frequencies) to this recreational past time, to be honest I think Ham radio will eventually seduce me one day... just not for the moment LOL

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    That's using your noodle... the guys I know would take it in on more as a personal challenge (though you could toss in a little financial reward), while I'm more fond of the analogue meter than the later LCD/LED variations, I'd have to agree that an additional amplified field strength meter would certainly increase your search accuracy/efficiency immensely
    Maelstrom, you a ham?
    KC5SAS here.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    We did get the radio and battery charger back for $250.00 cash and no police but it was a mess and hard to believe the meeting was only 500 yds from the site as I went with the Ops Manager to verify the radio was working fine and not damaged.

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  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
    As a ham I can tell you that if there are any active hams doing Fox Hunts in his area then contacting them would be a good idea. If he's in the USofA a good place to search out a local club would be to go here -> http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml and see what clubs are in the area. Then contact them and see if they can help.
    That's using your noodle... the guys I know would take it in on more as a personal challenge (though you could toss in a little financial reward), while I'm more fond of the analogue meter than the later LCD/LED variations, I'd have to agree that an additional amplified field strength meter would certainly increase your search accuracy/efficiency immensely

    Leave a comment:


  • MSPofficer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock View Post
    In this day and age, it is hard to believe serial numbers were not recorded for at least "high dollar" items. Hopefully when new radios are purchased, property management might get the bold concept idea of recording the serial numbers and keeping those numbers in a safe location within the company's other valuable paperwork.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    I agree with Mr Warnock, get the serial numbers next time.

    God Bless
    MSP Officer

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by airtight security officer View Post
    the brea police wa advise of the theft and a report was taken we did not have serial numbers
    In this day and age, it is hard to believe serial numbers were not recorded for at least "high dollar" items. Hopefully when new radios are purchased, property management might get the bold concept idea of recording the serial numbers and keeping those numbers in a safe location within the company's other valuable paperwork.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    May not be much help in this case, but if you are considering a new radio purchase, get a model that has the radio kill/stun feature.

    This is the model we are planning to go with, http://www.icomamerica.com/en/produc...s/default.aspx

    We are getting the IC-F43GT. It also has a feature called power on password, which requires a password when the unit is turned on.

    The local radio shop is selling these for $250.00, plus $16.00/month per radio for repeater access.

    Not a bad price for all the features.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    It happens to others too. I have heard the fire department pleading for "the person who took the radio, to leave it somewhere, call 9-1-1 saying where you left it & no charges will be laid".

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Where I worked once, an idiot took the patrol car offsite to get Pizza and left it unlocked with a portable radio, site keys and alarm control codes on the passenger seat. Keys and books were not touched but the portable radio was taken and the 12 volt battery charger as well. It shut down the whole company's network for weeks as we had been blasted with Arabic Music at every given chance. It wrecked havoc on the whole company and screwed up the company's ops. 1 staff member was fired for it and the other one SHOULD have been fired but used his union buddies to get off with a final warning. All it takes ................ and a network is shut down !!!

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  • airtight security officer
    replied
    the brea police wa advise of the theft and a report was taken we did not have serial numbers

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  • Alaska Security
    replied
    in all honesty I don't know, most hams have equipment tuned for their operating bands... some might though. I know I don't, which is why utilizing the 4 radio method of gross triangulation would be most effective.

    You already have radios specific for that frequency, and if they're transmitting you can do it on your own. It's not that hard to do as long as you can keep them talking. Hence my posting of 2 different methods. You can even do the first one with a single radio if you have a supervisor or someone who is mobile and can be able to get 4 points of reception loss... then you cover the sphere of infulence of the radio and will get a generalized location... at least within a city block if not less.

    We used this method with scanners overseas to locate individuals that needed a visit from black helicopters. it works...
    Last edited by Alaska Security; 12-26-2007, 06:11 PM.

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    As a ham I can tell you that if there are any active hams doing Fox Hunts in his area then contacting them would be a good idea. If he's in the USofA a good place to search out a local club would be to go here -> http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml and see what clubs are in the area. Then contact them and see if they can help.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Alaska Security View Post
    if they're transmitting, get multiple radios split up n/s/e/w... log where you lose radio reception of them, pull out a street map and connect n/s and e/w and that vicinity is where he's hanging out at.


    just a modified variation of aerial beacon location searching... but instead of moving one radio to do it, this method is faster provided you have the time and manpower to try to recoup the gear.. quick and dirty fox hunt vs having to use a yagi directional to try to pick it up...

    If you have a directional antenna, just go to 2 known points and log the azimuth you pick up the transmissions from at each point... draw a line from the known pos on a map away at that az... X marks the spot, again...
    Alaska - Do you agree that a Ham Radio club would probably have the directional equipment, manpower & williness to help him?

    Leave a comment:


  • Alaska Security
    replied
    if they're transmitting, get multiple radios split up n/s/e/w... log where you lose radio reception of them, pull out a street map and connect n/s and e/w and that vicinity is where he's hanging out at.


    just a modified variation of aerial beacon location searching... but instead of moving one radio to do it, this method is faster provided you have the time and manpower to try to recoup the gear.. quick and dirty fox hunt vs having to use a yagi directional to try to pick it up...

    If you have a directional antenna, just go to 2 known points and log the azimuth you pick up the transmissions from at each point... draw a line from the known pos on a map away at that az... X marks the spot, again...
    Last edited by Alaska Security; 12-26-2007, 02:39 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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