Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How can a client get a better quality security officer?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    How much does this have to do with their being former police officers, and how much of this has to do with their actually being able to do the job assigned?
    There are many reasons that former cops can make great security officers. My counterpart has 32 years experience as a licensed police officer. Here's what he has to offer:

    1. 32 years of carrying a loaded gun in public.
    2. 32 years experience in dealing with people at their worst.
    3. 32 years experience in writing reports, and testifying in court.
    4. No desire to "play cop." He's our only guy who'll carry a gun only if he HAS to. He doesn't drive a surplus Crown Vic, and you won't find any "tactical" gear in his car trunk!

    In Minnesota, you need at least an associates degree to be a cop. We hire many current law enforcement students and recent graduates. We know that someday, they'll get a cop job and move on. But while they're with us, we enjoy having college-educated officers who can write decent reports; officers who are doing something related to their career choice and something they enjoy doing rather than auto-mechanic's students who want the job to get paid while studying.

    Don't get me wrong, there are former cops and law enforcement students who don't make good cops or security officers. Heck, I've had to fire a few of both myself. But in my experience, former cops, currently licensed cops, and kids going to law enforcement school are excellent choices for security officers.
    Last edited by Badge714; 12-19-2007, 10:00 PM. Reason: redundant words
    "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
      My 1st FTO with the tiny town PD I worked for (who was also part time, the only true full timer was the Chief lol) owned a small security company. I once told me that some very smart clients would specifiy a minimum officer wage from the start before openning up the bidding process, and bidding companies knew from the outset what they would have to charge to make the contract doable.

      That seems a clinet driven process the way it was with him, but I'd think a smart security company could turn that around and make that a selling point. The whole "yes we charge a bit more, but the quality you get exceeds the extra amount you will pay"

      They need to explain to the prospective client the monumental (hell, exponential) quality differance you get from an officer who is making above average wages without needing overtime than what you get from an officer who works a full schedule PLUS overtime and still can't make ends meet. The security company can also be WAY more selective and probably assure a very low turnover rate like this too.

      As my old FTO used to say (for some reason he thought I'd end up owning a security business, heck he might have been trying to sell me his ) SELL the positives and you MAKE the sale (or something like that).



      Like everything else, it depnds how you do it. There is the right way and then there is Wackenhut (lol, and I can say that because I used to be a CPO ).

      When I was with Wackenhut, the "officer quality" among CPOs (who are required to have military or LE or corrections experiance or at least training) was widely variable, because the hiring rules were so lose. I was able to be a CPO because I was a reserve police officer (with less than a year of experiance) and had been to the police academy. Another guy (my partner on the site I worked) retired a Sergeant 1st Class from the Army after 20 years. A THIRD who had worked for a private corrections corporation for 2 months (technically fulfilling the requirement) was also a CPO.

      We all made the exact same money, and Wackenhut was charging the client out the wazoo for us to be there. It was crazy sometimes, I remember on guy in the Wackenhut Armed guard class who had been an MP in the Army 20 years (and 200 pounds) ago, he answered every shoot/don't shoot question SHOOT (he was later involved in an incident where his weapon was taken from him on post, he was lucky to be alive). it was just not a good situation IMO.

      Contrast that with my experiance working for Alrod Security on the GSA contract. By then I had 2 years of police experiance and that just barely got me though the door. Just going to the police academy or being a Detention officer for a while would not have cut it. They also checked to see if I was in good standing with my PD, something Wackenhut did not do.

      For ex-military, you had to have atleast an honorable discharge with nothing major (as far as disciplinary actions) on your service record and be seperated from the service no more than 5 years. Everyone had to pass a physical and take a PT test. Thats alll in addition to the GSA requirements and testing.

      The team I worked with at the Federal Building was THE most top notch private security unit I've ever experianced, all of us ex or reserve LEOs or retired or ex military. Hell, there are times I wished I'd stayed on there at least part time when i went to work for the college.

      When it's done RIGHT, requiring prior service of some sort can be a big boon (and another major selling point), just lots of companies don't do it right at all.
      When I was an active employee with Wackenhut, they added 4 year college degree (believe it could be a BS or a BA) as fulling requirement to be a CPO
      with the other prerequisites Black Caesar posted above.

      The office I was working out of was not so great. I was brought on as a full time armed officer and was put at a small, unarmed site part time with two grave yard shifts. I did end up getting hours with Allied again that summer. I ended up requesting only one night shift a week and that somehow was turned into refusal to work by the supervisor. The DM called me I told him what I was brought on for and where I ended up and I was just requesting not demanding or refusing with the work hours. He said he was going to look into and get back to me. It's been 18 months and never heard anything from him!

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by hisownhero View Post
        If a guy has security experience and a license but has worked for several companies in a smaller amount of time, I don't hire them even though he looks good on paper.
        I'm the same way. Another thing I check for is whether applicants give proper notice to ther last job. I've had currently-employed guards from our competitors say they could start "immediately" without giving proper notice. I wouldn't touch them with a 10 ft pole.
        I have a little saying; "If they did it to you, they'll do it to ME!"
        "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by hisownhero View Post

          If I had it my way, all security officers would have to sign a non compete agreement agreeing not to work for another company for a certain amount of time or within a certain distance of any site they've worked and have the minimum distance be far enough out that they know they can't just up and leave and work at the building next door.
          See, I signed a non-competition agreement with my security company, and I'll be honest, I couldn't care less about what it says. For one, the gal who wrote it up stole it from her prior company so the irony just kills me. On top of that, there are a few places where the original company's name is still in the contract. Awesome.

          I think non-competition agreements are the opposite of beneficial employment. If I am at, say, my current company and wish to work for another security company due to better gigs, or more money - why should the fact that I was a guard somewhere else before matter? I see the point of not going around and bouncing from company to company, that's not what I am saying...what I am saying is that if another company can offer me more, I am an individual - I can decide on where I want to work.

          I've worked in much more lucrative industries and never had to sign such a document....is this just designed to scare people straight?

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Silva Consultants View Post
            With very few exceptions, most of my clients are less than completely satisfied with the level of professionalism that they receive from their contract security officers. The most common complaints are lack of people skills, lack of motivation, and failure to understand enough about the client's business to really do their job correctly. High turnover is also a major issue.

            In fairness to the security companies, many of these same clients are the same ones that always take the "low bid" when soliciting proposals for security services.

            My question is this: can a client really pay more to get more? That is, if the current billing rate for an officer is $20 per hour, can they offer to pay $25 an hour and get a better officer? Or will they be paying more to get the same basic thing? If paying more money works, what percentage increase in pay would make a difference?

            From the perspective of the security company, what else can the client do to improve the quality of officer and level of service that they receive?

            The majority of my client base is in Washington, Oregon, and Calfornia, if this makes a difference.
            Your clients should ask for a full breakdown of the bill rates, including, of course the pay rates. Everything else being equal, it then comes down to which companies do a better job screening, hiring, training and supervising their people. I would look to a strong regional company for this. Real small companies often cut corners and the nationals are asleep at the wheel.
            Richard Dickinson
            Dickinson Security Management Group, LLC
            DSMG Provides a Variety of Software Products and Consulting Services to the Contract Security Industry
            www.hrdickinson.com

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Silva Consultants View Post
              With very few exceptions, most of my clients are less than completely satisfied with the level of professionalism that they receive from their contract security officers. The most common complaints are lack of people skills, lack of motivation, and failure to understand enough about the client's business to really do their job correctly. High turnover is also a major issue.

              In fairness to the security companies, many of these same clients are the same ones that always take the "low bid" when soliciting proposals for security services.

              My question is this: can a client really pay more to get more? That is, if the current billing rate for an officer is $20 per hour, can they offer to pay $25 an hour and get a better officer? Or will they be paying more to get the same basic thing? If paying more money works, what percentage increase in pay would make a difference?

              From the perspective of the security company, what else can the client do to improve the quality of officer and level of service that they receive?

              The majority of my client base is in Washington, Oregon, and Calfornia, if this makes a difference.
              Here is an example: http://www.hrdickinson.com/products/...tanalysis.html
              Richard Dickinson
              Dickinson Security Management Group, LLC
              DSMG Provides a Variety of Software Products and Consulting Services to the Contract Security Industry
              www.hrdickinson.com

              Comment


              • #22
                No question that substantially higher pay will yield a better quality guard. You'll attract a larger pool of candidates to choose from, like one poster earlier alluded to.

                More importantly, you can afford to be more selective in your job requirements, thus filtering unqualified applicants.

                But just paying the contract security company a higher rate won't do it. Make sure that translates to higher pay for the guard.

                Locally, one company was billing a high profile client in the entertainment industry well over $100 per hour per guard. Client later found out the guards were getting paid only $20 per hour, was upset (understandably so) and fired and replaced that company.

                A $10 per hour guard is different than a $20 per hour guard is different than a $50 per hour guard. Of course, as a client, you can't just pay it, you have to verify you're getting what you pay for.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by hisownhero View Post
                  Another thing I ran into was the amount of work the officers have to do. I work for a large national company. The people at my site do everything from fire panels, responding to codes, checking fire extinguishers and patrolling, to doing non security related work because this is what the client demands. They feel that for 10.50 an hour, why should they do that when their peers down the street work at a high rise, make 11.00 an hour, and do a quarter of the amount of work.
                  Excellent point! The contract must call for adequate staffing, and the post responsibilities/expectations must be realistic. No matter what you pay an officer, or how conscientious he might be, he cannot provide a high level of service if he is being run off his feet because he's asked to secure more area than is proper, is having to try to reconcile the demands of conflicting duties, or because he is being used in ways that detract significantly from the security mission.
                  "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                  "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                  "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                  "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
                    I asked an attorney friend of mine, and she said that fur trappers aren't a protected class. Now if I was a GAY fur trapper, maybe I'd have a case!
                    LOL....LMAO!!
                    THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I refuse to work for anyone who has a noncompete clause. They could fire you, now you can't go get another job in that line of work.

                      I have had bad experiences,such as a company pays every 2 weeks.The checks were always late, and when u finally get paid it's almost time for another check. They always blamed it on the post office, but they wouldn't fix the problem, such as direct deposit. They said some s/o's couldn't get a bank account, b/c they kept writting bad checks, bad credit,etc.

                      I have received paychecks that bounced.

                      I have seen armed security w/out an armed license.

                      I have observed supervisors w/ far less experience, and training.
                      THE VIEWS EXPRESSED ON THIS WEBSITE/BLOG ARE MINE ALONE AND DO NOT NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Silva Consultants View Post
                        With very few exceptions, most of my clients are less than completely satisfied with the level of professionalism that they receive from their contract security officers. The most common complaints are lack of people skills, lack of motivation, and failure to understand enough about the client's business to really do their job correctly. High turnover is also a major issue.

                        In fairness to the security companies, many of these same clients are the same ones that always take the "low bid" when soliciting proposals for security services.

                        My question is this: can a client really pay more to get more? That is, if the current billing rate for an officer is $20 per hour, can they offer to pay $25 an hour and get a better officer? Or will they be paying more to get the same basic thing? If paying more money works, what percentage increase in pay would make a difference?

                        From the perspective of the security company, what else can the client do to improve the quality of officer and level of service that they receive?

                        The majority of my client base is in Washington, Oregon, and Calfornia, if this makes a difference.
                        Others have already made some very good points, so I won't go into any detail here. Suffice it to say I agree with what has already been posted. An old saying comes to mind here, "You get what you pay for." If your clients want better officers, then yes they have to be willing to pay more than $13/hr for the contract. And as others have said, they need to make SURE that the added pay is going to the OFFICER, not into the contract company's profit. The vast majority of contract officers out there are making between $8-12/hr here in the PNW. When an opening comes up for a job paying $18/hr+ they go quick, and usually to the officers with more experience/training.

                        As hrdickinson put it, I would recommend staying away from the small "mom & pop" companies, and DEFINATELY stay away from the huge national ones. Look for the middle-ground companies that are large enough to be running a good ship, but still small enough to give a rats butt about what's going on.
                        Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                        Originally posted by ValleyOne
                        BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                        Shoulda called in sick.
                        Be safe!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Some valid points have been raised including a client's expectations when paying a premium rate but not knowing the staff are on minimal rates. A CPP role I accepted with a tv celeb 11 years ago was to have been with a partner for 10 / of my 12 hours. I arrived and 4 hours later my partner arrives in uniform / unarmed. 4 hours later he leaves so I work alone for 8 / 12 hours. Next week I am at the office getting my taxi receipts paid when I see a fax coming in for my CPP job. I see 2 x CPO x 12 hours and a rate 12 times what they paid me. No wonder I was paid to go by taxis. I resigned the following week after I was as I was furious to see such BS around.

                          Higher pay does not always guarantee better staff but does attract anyone with a licence or certifications. Often people will flash their exLEO or military experience around and without proper screening you could have a chef or clerk working as your new supervisor / manager.

                          Clients expect more bang for their bucks and now will expect the S/O to be also concierge, receptiontion, parking attendant and also to be the tour guide around visitors. Many are too tight with their budgets to pay more for these extra staff but demand better service beyond the scope of the contract.

                          Competition does not always give the client the best offer - merely the cheapest. Some firms will undercut so much that they lose money in order to offer technical or consulting services to make up lost income. Don't expect to get anything of a suitable quality in these contracts as the staff are usually going to be paid almost nothing and forced to work 12 hour shifts x 5 days to make up for low wages.
                          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I think a major reason is pay...plain and simple not EVERYONE takes pride in the work they do even if they are payed little. My philosophy is do the job the best you can regardless....if you dont like the pay go get a different job.

                            But it is hard to expect to get the most professional people in the world for 8 bucks an hour around here. So unfortunatly you attract alot of bums who just happen to not have a criminal record and live in thier parents basment with no motivation to do anything.

                            I have found working conditions/pay/workmates to be better in an "in-house" security force like I work with now. They are able to cut out the middle man, we are employees of the hospital. The pay is better and so are the attitudes and type of people. Also it seems most here take a little pride in the fact that they work here...actually dealing with people/situations instead of guarding cheese or pudding.

                            Basically it comes down to the person...I may take my job serisously and do it well...but if I'm good then you can bet I wont be around long with only 8 bucks an hour.....its insulting to pay someone with responsibility that....hell the kids at McDonalds make 7.50. Better pay and some responsibilty = pride in work and at least an applicant pool with people who have potential. Seriously what person qualified with experince etc. or whatever would work for 8-9 bucks an hour??

                            Sometimes I wonder why McDonalds doesnt hire 5 people at 10 bucks an hour instead of 10 people at 7 bucks an hour or whatever...same prinicple..better pay means possibility for better help and that means less screwed up food orders that I drive away with. I gaurentee that if the companies payed the officers around 15 and the companies took the rest....there would be a DIRECT correlation with performance, you would still have idiots (hopefully weeded out in interviews) but generally as a rule they would be more satisfied.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              You want better S/O's???

                              I have noticed a few things that contribute to officer performance:

                              1. Smaller companies tend to have higher customer satisfaction ratings. They are smart enough to not over-extend themselves and do not tax their officers with unrealistic demands, i.e. working 5 or 6 12+ hour shifts in a week. The average human cannot handle that kind of work and still carry on life.

                              2. You get what you pay for. If I am making $10/hr and am having to do guard tours, lock/unlock, foot patrol and occassionally stand in for other guards, I am on my way to another job.

                              3. Training is essential. S/O's should be given some sort of incentive program for advancement. If I do not monetarily benefit from getting extra certs, and all they mean is I get to do more work, I will not get them...

                              4. Screen your employees. I just started a new job recently and was hired on as a 'supervisor' on the spot without calling my past employers or anything. I do my job as all my supers will attest to, but this is how you get terrible employees. "Garbage in=Garbage out."

                              5. Better equipment helps as well. Not only does it improve officers' morale when they look sharp, they can more effectively perform their duties. I worked for a company that refused to give us rain gear. They always had a lame excuse why we didn't have it. To explain, Texas state law requires our badge, company name, and "Security" to be visible on the outermost layer of our clothing, be it jacket, rain gear, or whatever. I worked a post where I did not leave my vehicle for 12 hours except to use the head because it was pouring down rain. WE DO NOT GET PAID ENOUGH TO DEAL WITH CRAP LIKE THAT OR GET SICK FOR OPS MANAGERS' STUPIDITY.

                              6. Better management and supervisors. If we sense incompetence in our higher-ups, we will usually disount them. I have supers who have been in the business less than I have. They may have business degrees, but they know nothing about how to do my job. They do not understand field work. This is why I am such a supporter of promoting from within.

                              7. Fire all your WBS wastes of space if counseling does not do the trick. The 300# yeti with the nacho cheese stains on his untucked, wrinkled uniform shirt,with his piercings and inability to shower, shave or cut his mop of hair, not to mention his white tennis shoes with his black uniform pants he found on the floor or his beat-up Civic hatchback while hungover/stoned to annoy clients with his lack of knowledge, talking through his unbrushed teeth while listening to his iPod or reading his comics or playing his Nintendo DS, or talking with what, miraculously, appears to be a girlfriend should not be allowed to show up late and unprepared on site (no flashlight on night shifts, etc.), this kind of 'guard' should be fired...I have worked with them and I have seen them with other companies who then wonder why they cannot keep accounts.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                #7 made me laugh Dougo, as their Aussie cousins have worked around me a few times.

                                Further to comments on company equipment, it is the little things that upset the apple cart which includes radios that are non functional or have faulty batteries. Torches often have flat batteries with no1 going to change them over or find the spares missing again. It does not take much to persuade a good security professional to accept a better offer from a rival firm.
                                "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                                Comment

                                Leaderboard

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X