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  • #16
    Two things I have noticed in my career.

    1. People do not like us when they are doing something wrong and we caution/correct the situation.

    2. If something goes wrong and they are involved, we are their new best friend.
    You are not defeated unless you believe you are -Fernando
    The world is full of willing people; some willing to work and the rest willing to let them - Robert Frost

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    • #17
      Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
      If I had a nickle for everyone who swore at me after telling them that they were making too much noise at 3 a.m........
      HS that seems to be a huge problem with your type of post. This should start with the Hotel front desk to profile guest when they check in and say four 19 year olds check in then they should get a friendly warning about any problems with behavior First time a warning and second time pack your bags a cab will be waiting out front and the cab fee will go on your credit card.
      THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
      THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
      http://www.boondocksaints.com/

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      • #18
        Originally posted by CAP View Post
        ...As long as you respect others and portray yourself with the utmost SELF-RESPECT and INTEGRITY, the people that you would approach and befriend will respond to you in the same positive way.

        Keep your head up!

        CAP
        Cap, while I strongly subscribe to your advice regarding officer deportment, we still have to be aware that there will always be some people who will not respond in kind and will react adversely to the mere presence of the officer, even up to the point of instigating violence in return for the courtesy and respect shown by the officer. It is not just that some people don't like to be told what to do...some of them may already be committing a crime, have just committed a crime, or are about to commit a crime when you approach, unknown to you. Or, they could be hopped-up on something so their reactions won't "match up" with your demeanor.

        By maintaining this awareness, the officer will not be surprised when this happens, as it will sooner or later. Surprise is always bad because it both delays reaction and contributes to selecting the wrong reaction.

        Since there is usually a verbal exchange, however brief, involved in the escalation to a physical threat, I strongly recommend that officers be trained in methods of verbal jiu-jitsu that can often interrupt this process of escalation.

        The Bible says, "A soft answer turneth away wrath", and I guess that's true sometimes. But, I hear that a lot of criminals don't read the Bible for some reason (a busy criminal doesn't have much time for reading), so I advise officers to maintain space, always know where to take cover and keep their weapons ready just in case you run across one of these heathens.

        When dealing with other people (the non-crims), I find that requests work better than commands, and that there's nothing demeaning to your "authority" if you provide an explanation to someone who asks "Why?". This is a new day, and a lot of people in society reject the notion of "blind obedience to authority". These people, who are perfectly law-abiding, will also challenge or ask the reason for a command given by anyone in authority. It helps a lot if we understand that this is not a phenomenon experienced only by security officers, nor any reflection on our "position" or even "respect". Ask any police officer, teacher, school principal, employer, minister or other authority figure and they'll tell you that their authority gets questioned every day. So, if you think that people only "push back" because you're a security officer, you're mistaken. Who buys Tasers? Police agencies - and it ain't because everyone just "hops-to" and obeys them when they issue a command.

        (Incidentally, there's also a paradox here: Be suspicious of an excessively "compliant" and "respectful" subject too. This is someone who seems overly agreeable, calls you "Sir" a dozen times a minute, and is eager to disengage from you. His eyes will usually be scanning for an escape route. If someone seems to be saying what you want to hear so you'll let him go on his way, ask yourself why.)
        Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-16-2007, 12:53 PM.
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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        • #19
          SecTrainer,
          I guess I should have read all of the Posts a little more closely. I was under the impression the main focus of the topic was the general pubic's view of security industry.

          I agree with the points you have made in your post when it comes to subject contact, and officer alertness to the fella who is just a "little too nice".

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          • #20
            The easy answer is yes and no.

            The harder answer is why the differing responses.

            There have been many ideas posted here to explain some of the reasons people feel the way they do, so I'm not going to try to explain that.

            I am just going to say that people do feel good and bad about people in the security field. So you just need to do the best job you can, so your employer, and client, feel good about you, that's whats it's all about, because bottom line, that equals your paycheck.

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            • #21
              As Nathan stated, very well, that you do represent authority. People hate being told what to do, regardless if you are a LEO or a SO. Even if it is in their best interest. Individuals want speed and convienence and any road blocks placed in the way is an annoyance, such as detours because of a traffic crash or a guest/vendor required to sign in. They degrade you because they "make more money than you!" or " you're a guard because you failed the police academy!". I know I am disliked and I am okay with that. I am not " Ofc. Friendly" and truth be told, I don't have to be. I get compliance 8 times out of 10. Just bear in mind that they hate the uniform and badge, not the person wearing them. IMHO!

              Be Safe,

              Hank
              " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

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              • #22
                Although, I have learned through a couple of years of working in the "Jail System" and over 10 years of working EMS in a low income area that no matter who you encounter-if you show them respect, the "street respect" they desire, the majority of the time things will work in a more positive manner than walking up trying to be Billy Bad A$$. Yes, there are times when you have got to drop the gloves and take a more "nasty" approach.

                Also I have learned that these people that you give that respect to, go a little easier on, help out during a hard time in their life, will in turn help you when you find yourself in that situation where the drunk won't comply and wants to fight you or whatever the situation is that arises.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by CAP View Post
                  SecTrainer,
                  I guess I should have read all of the Posts a little more closely. I was under the impression the main focus of the topic was the general pubic's view of security industry.
                  ...and that's what I addressed in saying that many people today "push back" at or view all forms of authority with disfavor and distrust - not just security. In part, this is because there is no institution of authority in society (legal, political, religious, business, etc.) that has not been sullied in recent years by misconduct of those in authority, eroding trust and respect for all who are in authority.

                  For us, it's Blackwater. For the police, it's Rodney King or whoever was taken down on TV yesterday. For politicians, it's Clinton. For teachers, it's any number of them having sex with kids. For religion, it's pedophile priests or Jim Bakker. For business, it's Enron and Lay. There's widespread cheating and misbehavior in our society among those in authority, and the result is widespread disrespect for authority, security or any other.

                  A good book on this subject is "The Cheating Culture: Why More Americans Are Doing Wrong to Get Ahead" by David Callahan. There's even a website and blog based on the book: http://www.cheatingculture.com/. Read the book, and you'll understand that many Americans have simply withdrawn their "blind acceptance" or trust of authority - and for good reason. My point here is that failure or slowness in compliance is not an indication of how people necessarily feel about security, but about all authority.
                  Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-20-2007, 03:39 AM.
                  "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                  "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                  "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                  "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                  • #24
                    I tend to notice more people who dont like security.. I had allot of the tenants liking me since Id make it a point to walk in, see how the day was going and help them out, which was nice. They also knew I wasnt playing any games like some of the morons we had with us. But Ive had a anchor stores Loss Prevention call the police on me before, so obviously there is not allot of love there. Found it funny when the dispatcher told them no one would be responding. They called the store manager, who proceeded to go off on me over phone, and tried banning me from her store. That store never liked me at all after that. But in general, if somone needs something, then they like you. Especially if its something they are afraid to do. Otherwise, they think you're a highschool drop out or something who is kinda worthless. Doesnt help having bad officers out there reinforcing all of that. But Im not getting paid to make friends anyway..

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                    • #25
                      Some very good points posted above. A couple of you noted that helpfulness can soften people’s reaction to those times when authority must be exercised. That's very true and one of the strengths behind community policing where beat cops walk and interact personally with people who live in their sector. We can learn from that by being friendly and helpful to those at our site. This may help when we ask them to follow policy.

                      I had a guy come in this weekend who needed an item that he left in his office. Unfortunately, he didn't have after-hours access privileges. Instead of being hardnosed, I offered to go get the item while he remained in the lobby. He got what he wanted and I didn't have to break policy or instill bad feelings.
                      Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Chucky View Post
                        HS that seems to be a huge problem with your type of post. This should start with the Hotel front desk to profile guest when they check in and say four 19 year olds check in then they should get a friendly warning about any problems with behavior First time a warning and second time pack your bags a cab will be waiting out front and the cab fee will go on your credit card.
                        Chucky: I have posted many times about our problem in Montreal. The lawyers for the police have decided that an hotel room is your home. The Canadian Charter of Rights does not allow the police to evict someone from their home without a judgement from a court. No court meets in the middle of the night. Therefore a REGISTERED guest (not people he invites to visit) can NOT be thrown out in the middle of the night, only after his "lease" (Check-out date & time) is over or if he commits a criminal act. Making noise in the middle of the night is a by-law enfraction, not a criminal act.
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
                          The harder answer is why the differing responses.

                          There have been many ideas posted here to explain some of the reasons people feel the way they do, so I'm not going to try to explain that.
                          Quite simply because "Security" and the authority our uniform represents creates a varied array of responses in different people... it's not personal just what we represent (Nathan already covered this most eloquently)
                          "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

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                          • #28
                            I think that even though LP's don't wear uniforms a lot of this applies to us as well It seems that a lot of people (including associates), tend to misunderstand why we do what we do.
                            "Life In Every Breath"

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                            • #29
                              Not one of the associates likes me at our store. The only person that even talks to me is the HR lady.
                              Top Flight

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                              • #30
                                Hell, I know officers that hate other officers, won't speak to them, wave, smile, back them up......you name it. I have dealt with this first hand when dealing with other departments or passing them on the street, etc.

                                You would think that with all the "hating security" that goes on that the officers would at least stick together.

                                Maybe we should look in our own backyards first.
                                K9...."Protect all who enter"

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