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  • IAHSS Security Officer cert.

    Hi all,

    I recently applied to an area hospital for a security officer position. On the announcement they noted that they would prefer IAHSS membership and the basic training 4th edition for security officers.

    My question is, has anyone taken this certification? Is it difficult? Is it worth it? Any more info on this association or thoughts on hosipital security in general is appreciated!
    If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

    "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

  • #2
    I've taken the basic myself, it's fairly simple. I would suggest getting the manual because their is some hospital specific stuff on there, that if you've never worked in a hospital you won't know. Other than that it's pretty much common sense. I definitely think that it is worth it.

    As for hospital security, most here will tell you they've heard me say this before: Hospital Security is a completely different environment then any other security you will do. No matter if you work in a small local hospital or a large Level I trauma hospital, you are going to deal with some of the worse people and some good people at their worse.

    90% of the people that walk through your doors are already going to be emotional, upset, angry or in pain. Within 2 hours the other 10% are going to be emotional, upset and angry because they've been waiting!

    Personally I love hospital security. I have worked in 3 different hospitals and one day would like to go back to it. Remember to keep your head on a swivel and gloves on your hands.
    SecurityProfessional is Back up and running!

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the help gcmc! I'm gonna get the certification than. I can't really go full time with anyone until this summer, so I might as well use this time to get my certs. up to date.
      If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

      "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by gcmc security part 2 View Post
        I've taken the basic myself, it's fairly simple. I would suggest getting the manual because their is some hospital specific stuff on there, that if you've never worked in a hospital you won't know. Other than that it's pretty much common sense. I definitely think that it is worth it.

        As for hospital security, most here will tell you they've heard me say this before: Hospital Security is a completely different environment then any other security you will do. No matter if you work in a small local hospital or a large Level I trauma hospital, you are going to deal with some of the worse people and some good people at their worse.

        90% of the people that walk through your doors are already going to be emotional, upset, angry or in pain. Within 2 hours the other 10% are going to be emotional, upset and angry because they've been waiting!

        Personally I love hospital security. I have worked in 3 different hospitals and one day would like to go back to it. Remember to keep your head on a swivel and gloves on your hands.
        GCMC - I didn't think it was possible for someone to take the IAHSS tests (even Basic) unless they were sponsored by a senior member (in other words, had to be employed at a hospital already). Is that correct?

        I know the tests have to be proctored and the IAHSS site says that the proctor may be a senior member OR "other arrangements may be made if a senior member is not available".
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
          GCMC - I didn't think it was possible for someone to take the IAHSS tests (even Basic) unless they were sponsored by a senior member (in other words, had to be employed at a hospital already). Is that correct?

          I know the tests have to be proctored and the IAHSS site says that the proctor may be a senior member OR "other arrangements may be made if a senior member is not available".
          Let me answer my own question: IAHSS informs me that it is permitted for persons who are not employed currently in a hospital to take the online certification tests.

          This being the case, may I suggest that members who are not currently working in healthcare security consider adding this certification to your portfolio. Even though it is focused on "healthcare security", it is considered to be a very credible credential in our field, and should be familiar to most security employers. Of course, it would also instantly broaden your employment opportunities, and healthcare security positions in a given geographic area will often be among the best compensated. These are usually in-house positions, although there are contract services that specialize in HC security as well. It ranks right up there with government security services, college campus security, nuclear plant security, etc. in terms of the more "choice" positions in our industry. Specialization is good for your career.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 12-12-2007, 02:03 PM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

          Comment


          • #6
            You might want to check on if the hopital you are applying to is a screening/treatment center for mental health patients. If so then you are possibly in for a very physical job. My previous job was 6 months at the local hospital. Since the facility did not have any orderlies, security was called anytime a patient became unruly. While we had the ocassional call for an elderly patient that just wanted to go home, the majority of our calls were to assist with violent mental health patients and those under the influence of controlled substances. Granted only 10% of mental health patients become violent, however when the ER screens 100 a month, odds are good of a struggle every few days.
            With this in mind, gcmc security said it best, keep your gloves handy, as you never know when you might recieve a notification of exposure to both HIV and Hep-C from a single combative patient with cut wrists. (been there, done that, burned the t-shirt)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cnick001 View Post
              keep your gloves handy, as you never know when you might recieve a notification of exposure to both HIV and Hep-C from a single combative patient with cut wrists. (been there, done that, burned the t-shirt)
              100% agreed! however gloves alone don't offer sufficient protection from blood borne pathogens, eyes don't have a natural protective layer (unlike intact skin) and are an easy entry point for undesirable organisms... cover those eyes with protective eye wear!


              EDIT: - Cobra already supply these wrap style glasses below to hospitals in bulk, the styling provides additional protection to the eyes peripheral regions...

              Last edited by Maelstrom; 12-12-2007, 06:06 PM.
              "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

              Comment


              • #8
                Please tell me these come with interchangeable lens ?

                St Johns Ambulance is a volunteer 1st aid and ambulance organisation that provides medical support to events and country areas for ambulance transportation. These guys are voluntary and push for donations but subsidise things with training courses, 1st aid kits and other gear for sale. They used to sell a velcro wallet PPK with gloves, face shield and room for a bit more. I added some medi-preps (alcohol pads), betadine swab, bandaids and a disposable mini eye shield (piece of clear plastic and eslastic string.

                I think I paid $10.00 for mine and never leave without it in my bag or when I was working in uniform in one of my pockets. If something is small enough to not be left behind due to the bulk or shape of it in your pocket it will always be there. A 50 cent piece of gear could save you the agony of going through the testing of communicable diseases and the worry on your family.
                "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

                Comment


                • #9
                  AFAIK they're not interchangeable (being a cheap mass produced item)... but are available in any combination of black/grey frames with clear/amber/mocha (reflective & non-reflective) lenses, Smith & Wesson also market similarly styled safety eyewear... brand really shouldn't be the issue, it's the lateral eye protection of the design that's of primary importance IMHO

                  "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Just to let everyone know that I passed the Basic Exam for the IAHSS. Now I am going for the Advanced....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As long as you're padding your "Certification List", take a look at the FEMA site. They have a bunch of NIMS related courses. At my hospital S/Os are required to complete IS100HC, and IS200HC. Anyone in a supervisory position is also required to complete IS700, and IS800 as well.

                      There is no charge to get certified in any of these courses, and they will look good on your resume.

                      Here is a LINK to the NIMS courses. They also offer a lot of other courses that you might be interested in taking.

                      (you also get CEUs for completing them)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Big Jack View Post
                        As long as you're padding your "Certification List", take a look at the FEMA site. They have a bunch of NIMS related courses. At my hospital S/Os are required to complete IS100HC, and IS200HC. Anyone in a supervisory position is also required to complete IS700, and IS800 as well.

                        There is no charge to get certified in any of these courses, and they will look good on your resume.

                        Here is a LINK to the NIMS courses. They also offer a lot of other courses that you might be interested in taking.

                        (you also get CEUs for completing them)

                        Here are the ones that I have done. The First Aid and Hazmat were given through my employer along with the instructor trsainngs. The rest were all online and free.

                        Hazardous Materials First Responder Awareness Level

                        Hazardous Materials First Responder Instructor

                        FEMA-IS-241 Decision Making & Problem Solving

                        FEMA-IS-242 Effective Communications

                        FEMA-IS-002 Emergency Program Manager

                        FEMA-IS-002 Emergency Preparedness,USA

                        FEMA-IS-015 Special Events Contingency Planning

                        FEMA-IS-240 Leadership & Influence

                        FEMA-IS-230 Principles Of Emergency Management

                        FEMA-IS-235 Emergency Planning

                        FEMA-IS-317 Introduction To CERT

                        FEMA-IS-139 Exercise Design

                        FEMA-IS-244 Developing & Managing Volunteers

                        FEMA-Certificate of Achievement(Professional Development Series)

                        School of Public Health/Univ. of Albany,SUNY-Terrorism Preparedness & Pblic Health

                        NYS Emergency Management Office-ICS 100

                        USFA Certificate of Training-Emergency Response To Terrorism(Self Study)

                        NERRTC/DHS/ODP-WMD Terrorism Awareness For Emergency Responders

                        NERRTC/DHS/ODP-Public Works:WMD Basic Concepts

                        NERRTC/DHS/ODP-EMS I:Basic Concepts For WMD Incidents

                        NERRTC/DHS/ODP-WMD Incident Management/Unified Command

                        American Red Cross-First Aid CPR AED Instructor

                        Texas Engineering Extension Service- Children and Nerve Agents

                        Texas Engineering Extension Service- Introduction to SNS and Mass Prophylaxis

                        Texas Engineering Extension Service- Medical Effects of Primary Blast Injuries

                        Texas Engineering Extension Service- Emergency Management Concerns for the First Responder in Terrorism and Disasters

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Radiation Safety Disaster Preparedness

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Radiation Safety:Units

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Radiation Safety:Bioeffects and Standards & Radiation Detection

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Radiation Safety:Types of Radiation

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Chemical Weapons Detection Basics(Part 1&2)

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Chemical Weapons:Protection Basics

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Chemical Weapons:Introduction & Classification/Chemical Weapons:Basic Concepts

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Incident Command Systems(ICS) For Public Health

                        North Carolina Center for Public Health Preparedness- Crisis Leadership:Leadership at the Speed of Light

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Bioterrorism

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Chemical Terrorism

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Counterterrorism Incident Command

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness-Defense Against the Radiological Threat

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Food as an Effective Weapon of Terrorism

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Improving Your Communication Skills

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Managerial Communications

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Managing Conflict in the Workplace

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Practice-based Scenarios for Recognition, Detection and Exposure Assessment of Chemical Terrorist Agents

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Preparing for a Chemical Terrorist Event

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Recognition and Safe Handling of Chemical Terrorist Agents

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Using Risk Assessment in Chemical Emergencies to Protect Public Health

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Terrorism, Risk Assessment and Homeland Defense

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- The Terrorist Threat to Global Agriculture, Food and Water Supplies

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Managing Diversity Begins with You

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Communication Gap: Linking First Responders and First Receivers

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Planning, Implementation and Expolitation of a Field Exercise

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Biological Response Preparedness for Emergency Medical Services

                        South Central Center for Public Health Preparedness- Guidelines and tandards for a WMD Response

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Hazardous Materials Response-Awareness Level

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Incident Management System-Awareness Level

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Evacuation Coordinator

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Emergency Response Planning

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Unified Command-Awareness Level

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Bloodborne Pathogens

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Container Inspections

                        Michigan State University School of Criminal Justice- Hospital-Based Decontamination: Hazard Recognition

                        Use of force continuum instructor

                        President's DNA Initiative - What Every Law Enforcement Officer Should Know About DNA Evidence: First Responding Officers

                        President's DNA Initiative - What Every Law Enforcement Officer Should Know About DNA Evidence: Investigators and Evidence Technicians

                        President's DNA Initiative - Communication Skills, Report Writing, and Courtroom Testimony for Forensic Analysts

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just an update for everyone...

                          I finally took and passed the exam, so I'm basic certified now. Just waiting for them to send me the cert.
                          If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

                          "People look to you to dig them out of life threatening dung - that is an awesome responsibility and should be honoured with your blood and sweat in preparation for the day when you may have to work very hard to save someone you might not even know or like. If you are terrible at your job, somebody gets blinded/maimed/disfigured or killed."-Slack

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Congratulations.
                            -Jedi-
                            Semper Paratus

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Congrats.... Nice work

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