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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    I also believe in giving as much notice as I can. However, 4 hours may not be possible when it comes to gastrointestinal issues such as nausea/vomiting or unexpected motor vehicle problems. If you have a good track record, then your supervisor should understand. If not, expect consequences for a no call, no show incident.

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  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
    I agree that someone who is late on a regular basis, and does not call in (if possible) to report they are going to be late or sick, within a reasonable amount of time (and the amount of time necessary IS debatable) should be handled in the usual ways.

    First, the verbal warning; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Second, the write-up; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Third, the suspension; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Fourth, the termination.

    There are exceptions to every rule, and some exceptions are if the employee gets into an accident on the way to work and cannot call, if the employee has a true family emergency and cannot call, If the employee is abducted by aliens and cannot transport back to earth , or any other valid explanation that is brought up by the employee. In these cases there should be NO action taken against the employee.

    In regard to the "how much notification time should an employee be required to give if they are going to be late or sick," I think that depends on several circumstances. As brought up in this post, if you have a 12 or more hour shift, and you normally get up a couple of hours before your shift starts, how can you call in four hours before the shift starts to make notification that you are going to be sick today. There are always reason why a rule had to be broken, and so those reasons need at least to be listened to to determine if they were reasonable. If no reason is given, then it must be assumed there was no reason to have committed the company infraction by the employee.
    I had an employee claim her purse had been stolen for the fourth time and her car keys were in it. Funny thing was, she always managed to come up with a new set of keys. The last straw was when she told me her car had been stolen (a company vehicle). I drove over to see for my own eyes, and low and behold the car was parked right in front of her house. She almost went to jail for filing a false police report. If it would have been a guy, he would have went to jail. She claimed that it must have been someone who had stolen her purse (1 of 4 times) and they had keys to her car, and then they brought the car back and parked it in front of her house when they were through with it. She had to go, that was just the final straw.

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  • Alaska Security
    replied
    I give as much notice as possible.. if I wake up in the middle of the night feeling like crap and being dead to the world I'd call in at that point because 9 times out of 10 it's not going to get any better.

    I had one instance where I was one of 2 guards at a live-in posting. I caught my bi-annual cold... I don't get sick but once every 2 years, but when it hits it's a bad one.. anyway, getting sicker and sicker, I just told the other guard, my supervisor, that I was going to take the next day off but i would leave my radio on the security channel and if he required me for anything serious (working as guard-EMT for the camp) then give me a holler and I'd suck it up.

    Notice is not required with the company I work with, as per the employment agreement.. but I will still give as much as possible knowing that burning bridges is a bad thing. People don't understand the grass isn't always greener!

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  • craig333
    replied
    [QUOTE=NRM_Oz;45376]I recall a few graveyard shifts when I had a cough and cold and would be leaving home at 2200 and be going out into the cold winter night air (ok it did hit 30's which for us is freezing cold with an icy wind) and I would have a swig from the cough mixture bottle to make it through the 5 hour shift. I knew I would come home and rest but at the same time, was not sedimentary at home.

    I sure hope you meant sedentary

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I recall a few graveyard shifts when I had a cough and cold and would be leaving home at 2200 and be going out into the cold winter night air (ok it did hit 30's which for us is freezing cold with an icy wind) and I would have a swig from the cough mixture bottle to make it through the 5 hour shift. I knew I would come home and rest but at the same time, was not sedimentary at home. This post paid me over double the day rate due to the high risk involved but it was just a transit inspectors role in a nutshell. I have shift swapped with some people and bought them a packet of smokes or dinner when they have taken over my shift or vice versa at short notice - just to say thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • bpdblue
    replied
    I agree that someone who is late on a regular basis, and does not call in (if possible) to report they are going to be late or sick, within a reasonable amount of time (and the amount of time necessary IS debatable) should be handled in the usual ways.

    First, the verbal warning; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Second, the write-up; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Third, the suspension; and if it happens again within 6 months;

    Fourth, the termination.

    There are exceptions to every rule, and some exceptions are if the employee gets into an accident on the way to work and cannot call, if the employee has a true family emergency and cannot call, If the employee is abducted by aliens and cannot transport back to earth , or any other valid explanation that is brought up by the employee. In these cases there should be NO action taken against the employee.

    In regard to the "how much notification time should an employee be required to give if they are going to be late or sick," I think that depends on several circumstances. As brought up in this post, if you have a 12 or more hour shift, and you normally get up a couple of hours before your shift starts, how can you call in four hours before the shift starts to make notification that you are going to be sick today. There are always reason why a rule had to be broken, and so those reasons need at least to be listened to to determine if they were reasonable. If no reason is given, then it must be assumed there was no reason to have committed the company infraction by the employee.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    I prefer to give a two week notice if I can.

    However, work is a two way street. I show up on time everday and do my job as well as I can. I also expect certain things out of my company. Pay me on time, treat me passably and so forth. Good companies can expect two weeks notice, really bad companies might not get any.

    That said, even if I'd like to give my company two weeks notice, if get that call for my dream job that doubles my salary, gives me the shift of choice and great benefits, and they want me to start tomorrow? Sorry, I'm gonna call and tell my boss what happened and say I'm sorry. Risking a great job just to give two weeks notice isn't something I have the luxury of doing right now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
    I went to cover an open shift once. It was a 2200 cold start, and I got a call from the client at midnight saying they had no guard. I tried calling the guard's house - no answer, of course. I wound up working the shift myself, when I got there, I found a note from the guard written on the desk blotter in the security office saying that he quit. He wrote it the night before! So, I cut the note out of the blotter and placed it in his file. I found out from the staff working at the account that the guard had been telling them for 3 days that he was leaving to work for another company.
    Then a few days later he called me and asked for his job back! Apparently his new job fell through. After I quit laughing, I told him he was welcome to re-apply, but we didn't have any immediate openings!


    It can be really frustrating sometimes! We pay really well for contract security in the Minneapolis area, and sometimes people still throw their job away with a no call, no show.

    Leave a comment:


  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by Minneapolis Security View Post
    It seems like the work ethic has gotten really bad lately. I remember when people used to give 2 weeks written notice when they quit, now they often times just stop coming to work, and that is how they let you know they intend to quit.
    I went to cover an open shift once. It was a 2200 cold start, and I got a call from the client at midnight saying they had no guard. I tried calling the guard's house - no answer, of course. I wound up working the shift myself, when I got there, I found a note from the guard written on the desk blotter in the security office saying that he quit. He wrote it the night before! So, I cut the note out of the blotter and placed it in his file. I found out from the staff working at the account that the guard had been telling them for 3 days that he was leaving to work for another company.
    Then a few days later he called me and asked for his job back! Apparently his new job fell through. After I quit laughing, I told him he was welcome to re-apply, but we didn't have any immediate openings!

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    Really depends on the site you work whether coming in sick is an option. I usually do unless its one of those need to stay close to the toilet illnesses. But, if you work a hospital or some site where your work brings you into close contact with lots of people. My previous site, I'd hate to ride the elevator and to be hacking and coughing all over the elderly and already ill people who can't avoid me.

    Of course since most of don't get sick leave and can't afford to take time off, those around us just have to suffer.

    I really don't know how the four hour thing works. If I know I'm not going to make it before I go bed I'll call let em know then, but otherwise I won't know till I wake up. And I generally get up and go to work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    Sometimes you just have to buck up and come to work sick. It seems like the work ethic has gotten really bad lately. I remember when people used to give 2 weeks written notice when they quit, now they often times just stop coming to work, and that is how they let you know they intend to quit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
    Let me start by saying, I have always personally felt the 4hr call-in rule that a lot of companies have is completely bogus and I'm glad we don't have it at BHR.
    I like the 4 hour rule because it gives us time to fill open shifts and not leave a guard stranded for an unexpected double shift. I have a small area hour-wise, billing only 600 hours a week on average, but my accounts are spread out. in an emergency, a guard's relief may be coming from up to 90 MILES away. Four hours notice is not excessive.

    I have 17 guards who have collectively called off a total of 11 shifts this year. One guard called off just 1 hour before a shift once, and I knew that is was unavoidable, based on his previous attendance record. Another guard was 2 hours late when he hit a deer with his car on the way to work.

    A guard of mine who missed 3 days with questionable explanations and was late so many times would be gone already. One thing I like about our company is the policy that lets the area or site supervisor determine what is excessive tardiness or absenteeism. My guards clearly know what my expectations are, so I don't have any problems in this regard. -Thank God!

    Leave a comment:


  • Cactus
    replied
    Personally I despise people like this, if it were up to me... he would have been let go a while ago.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    No excuse for that much absenteeism. I would start building a case for dismissal. Company policy should have a step system for dealing with this type of problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Well I've not been in Security long enough to fully appreciate the difficulty experienced by Supervisors/Senior SOs when dealing with subordinates, but I've always been a strong supporter of a 1-to-1 chat when difficulties arise with fellow employees...

    Try to establish if there's a personal problem (perhaps direct them to some support network) all while keeping a professional manner about the conversation, set them straight relating to their responsibilities to the company, reinforcing the reality that this conduct won't be tolerated any further (explaining the eventual outcome) & finish off the conversation with the opportunity for them to clarify any queries they may have

    BTW congrats on the promotion to Supervisor UPF!

    Leave a comment:

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