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  • wvd1979
    replied
    Originally posted by mjw064 View Post
    I've been pulled over numerous times in the Commonwealth of Virginia and have not received a single speeding ticket.
    I'm glad to hear that. They have some hefty fines down there.

    Leave a comment:


  • 5423
    replied
    I never was a big fan of writing traffic cites; guess my personal philosophy somewhat mirrored Lawson's (would write the blatant safety issues in a heartbeat, and issue a verbal or written warning to most other infractions... for the reasons BC cites on page 1).

    (BTW, I like Nathan's phrase about citing for Stupidity Related Offenses...)

    In short: No, I was not taught to make a decision before exiting the unit; my decisions were usually finalized at the drivers' windows.

    Don't know what they're teaching at CHP Academy nowdays, but a guy I worked around a lot (Way Back When) told me that their policy was the opposite; if they lit you up, you were getting papered.

    bpdblue; both of my old FTO's eventually quit over the same sort of bureaucratic BS you relate... a sad loss to the LEO profession (2 of the finest cops, and men, I've had the pleasure to know and work with). All too common a scenario; and one of those Catch-22's that LEO managers deal with all day. You couldn't pay me enough to do their jobs!

    mjw; It's definately your tactful, diplomatic disposition, combined with your distinct lack of saracastic wit.

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  • mjw064
    replied
    Originally posted by doulos Christou View Post
    Were you pulled over for speeding?
    Yeah it's always for speeding. I agree with TALON that it's probably due to my easy-going, very diplomatic and impossible to dislike personality.

    Leave a comment:


  • talon
    replied
    Originally posted by mjw064 View Post
    I've been pulled over numerous times in the Commonwealth of Virginia and have not received a single speeding ticket.
    Must be your great personality and easy laid back demeanor

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by mjw064 View Post
    I've been pulled over numerous times in the Commonwealth of Virginia and have not received a single speeding ticket.
    Were you pulled over for speeding?

    Leave a comment:


  • mjw064
    replied
    Originally posted by wvd1979 View Post
    One agency that doesn't mess around is the Virginia State Police. If you are pulled over on I-95 for speeding, you WILL get a ticket.

    Even if you are a police officer from another state, you WILL get a ticket in Virginia.
    I've been pulled over numerous times in the Commonwealth of Virginia and have not received a single speeding ticket.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sgt.Campbell
    replied
    integrator, a wonderful thing is happening here today ...

    We agree.

    A person's demeanor will dictate whether or not they drive away with a citation. I work as a non-union person at a place where we watch over union workers. Many times, they adopt the typical "eff-you" attitude, which doesn't promote much good will. Those that are more remorseful or understanding generally just get a talking-to and go on their way.

    Good post though, and an important one for those of us who actually, for whatever reason, are asked to stop a client's agents/employees/residents.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by wvd1979 View Post
    One agency that doesn't mess around is the Virginia State Police. If you are pulled over on I-95 for speeding, you WILL get a ticket.

    Even if you are a police officer from another state, you WILL get a ticket in Virginia.
    I've generally observed that state/highway patrols are less likely to give warnings than other agencies. This is probably because, although they do other things, of course, they're primarily traffic cops who spend more time working horrific high-speed accidents and prying mangled bodies out of twisted metal than most other cops do, and I think this tends to give them more of a "zero tolerance" attitude about violations. I think you become somewhat immune to all the pitiful excuses people give you, too. The 17th time in one week that you hear a woman saying she's late to pick up her kids at school, you start to form this mental image of millions of mothers driving insanely around on the highways leaving death and destruction in their wake, and out comes the ticket book...

    Also, I would imagine that to some extent such agencies probably tend to attract some people who get personal satisfaction from writing tickets all day (if you didn't, why would you voluntarily do this kind of work?), as well as the fact that the number of citations written IS one important measure of job performance in highway patrol agencies - even to the extent of giving recognition within the agency to officers who write the most tickets. (Yes, I do know this for a fact, although I'm not talking about "quotas" per se.) And, in a way, this makes sense. If other officers working the same area or zone average 140 citations a month and some other officer is getting 80, his supervisor would naturally be interested in the reason for the difference, even though "140" isn't really a "quota" in the sense of being a "mandatory minimum" or something like that.

    Adding it all up, the tendency in these agencies is to write tickets, not warnings.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 09-13-2009, 02:33 AM.

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  • wvd1979
    replied
    One agency that doesn't mess around is the Virginia State Police. If you are pulled over on I-95 for speeding, you WILL get a ticket.

    Even if you are a police officer from another state, you WILL get a ticket in Virginia.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    I disagree with the "Im not stopping it unless its worthy of a ticket" idea. Unless you're a hardcore ticket writer. Just because it isn't worthy of a ticket doesn't mean it isnt unsafe.

    I'll stop for seatbelts, lamps burnt out, +10 over the Speed Limit, Fail to Indicate lane change, failure to stop for a stop sign, etc...

    But it doesnt necessarily mean I will cite for it, but on the flipside, it doesnt mean it doesnt need to be addressed with the driver.

    Leave a comment:


  • JB diligence
    replied
    I'm not going to stop someone unless there doing something worthy of a ticket in the first place, or have a vehicle malfunction that they should be aware of that needs to be fixed.

    I give allot of verbal warnings. When I do stop someone for something and they give me a stupid excuse I.E. just pull on there seatbelt then play me for an idiot (get's a ticket) as opposed to just being honest and saying 'no sir I didn't have it on' or 'Ahh sh*t I know better' guy, I'll more often then not, give them a break.

    As far as speeding goes I am fairly lenient, 24 Km/H or lower over depending on the attitude I'll probably drop it it and give a verbal warning depending on the attitude. 25+ Km/H your getting a ticket because that is greatly exceeding the speed limit and a person should know better.

    Bottom line is that I try to treat people as I would like to be treated my self, but I have been known to say in my own vehicle "this rig don't roll till the seatbelts click"...

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    I found that when you stop a driver for doing something stupid which could cause harm and make him or her sit there for up to 10 minutes while you politely discuss the advantages of being a sensible driver does the trick. County supervisors, duly elected by fellow citizens, may complain to your chief but quickly learn you don't play favorites.
    Parents trying to maintain order, before the era of seat belts and booster seats, was one that you could address directly to the children that their father or mother trying to protect them was the reason they were stopped was a favorite of mine and maintain eye contact with each child and proved it worth. They moved from lane to lane without signalling or failure to come to a complete stop at the stop sign was caused by the parent involved with the child. We got calls from parents thanking us for the lecture to them as well as the child or children.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
    As a side note, In 1987 I lead my department in felony arrests, drunk driving arrests, and some other category that I don't now recall. I was also a top three in some other categories. I, and several other officers, were given a luncheon by the department for our great work done. But, since I was only writing five or six tickets a month I was given a warning that I was not performing to department standards, and could be written up if it continues.
    I
    This is a sad, but not unusual, story. One nice thing about issuing warnings is that you're not tied up as long with the stop, and not tied up in court. This means that you can actually make MORE citizen contacts compared with an officer who insists on writing a citation every time. You will also have fewer citizen complaints to deal with, incidentally.

    Increased citizen contacts - assuming that you're paying attention to the contents of the vehicle, whether you're going to warn OR cite - can certainly add up to making more arrests for "felony contents", so to speak (weapons, drugs, contraband, etc.) simply because you're getting the opportunity to look inside more vehicles, at least on a "visual" basis...and it's amazing how many people will have "in-view" weapons, alcohol, pipes, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I only wrote lease violations, since a few of our properties made it a violation of the lease to operate a vehicle unsafely, or to violate any law or ordinance of the state.

    In this case, if I started a stop, you were getting a "ticket," or a trespass warning. I always looked at it like this. If I, as a private security guard/officer/agent/person had to stop your vehicle, then it was past the threshold of a warning.

    I would generally start a stop for "stupidity related offenses." And by that, I mean stuff that you know you shouldn't do. Doing 25 in a 10. Unlawful exhibition of speed (Burnouts and jackrabbit starts.) Driving on the wrong side of the marked lane road. Running stop signs.

    Unlike a state citation, getting enough of these meant you were going to be evicted. After a week of writing cites, the traffic problems on the property calmed down a lot. Normally, the property was unarmed, but the property management put in writing: WE DON'T CARE IF HE WILL ONLY WORK ARMED. SEND HIM OUT WITH HIS GUN. JUST SEND HIM HERE!

    It was a perfect example of enforcing state or local law as provisions of the lease to protect the safety of the residents, their visitors, and the client. As well as reduce the risk of liability to the management company and owners for failing to address dangerous violations of the lease and traffic code.

    It was fun times. By the time I was done, we were racking up enough calls for service to open yet another small police department.

    Leave a comment:


  • bpdblue
    replied
    I too was never a big ticket writer. I felt it was the worst contacts I had with the general public. I would normally give warnings for violations that were not dangerous to other persons (including other drivers, pedestrians) on the road, and that were not so dangerous as to be reckless.

    As a side note, In 1987 I lead my department in felony arrests, drunk driving arrests, and some other category that I don't now recall. I was also a top three in some other categories. I, and several other officers, were given a luncheon by the department for our great work done. But, since I was only writing five or six tickets a month I was given a warning that I was not performing to department standards, and could be written up if it continues.

    I couldn't believe it. When my sgt. told me about it I told him I was going to have a talk with the commander (who issued the warning) about this. The sgt said he would come to back me up, and he did. (I was his best stat producer after all )

    When I met with the commander (who liked me, so that was not an issue, And I'm not stupid enough to blow up on him) I told him I was out producing most of the department. He told me he knew that, and knew I'd be in to see him. We talked about citations for awhile, and he ended up saying I'd have to write more, but would not tell me how many because you cannot set a mandatory number in my state. I told him I could just start writing all the drunk drivers I had been arresting a citation for the violation I had stopped them for insted of making an arrest.

    He smiled and then told me if I wrote 10 tickets a month I would not hear from him again about this issue. I did start to write the 10 tags, but I must admit that this situation really upset me with the department, and I never had stats like I had that year again.

    Leave a comment:

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