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  • #16
    I always use Sir and Ma'am, Miss, etc. This is especially important when dealing with older folks, who were brought up in a different era.
    When I am working at the hospital, I refer to patients as Mr. Jones, or Mrs. Smith even though I know their first names. If they insist on me using a first name I will, but not without being asked to first.
    "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
      I always use Sir and Ma'am, Miss, etc. This is especially important when dealing with older folks, who were brought up in a different era.
      When I am working at the hospital, I refer to patients as Mr. Jones, or Mrs. Smith even though I know their first names. If they insist on me using a first name I will, but not without being asked to first.
      A 'quaint' way to get around that is call them Mr. Bob, Ms. Cathy, ... Its done here all the time, and now I can see why: it gets around the problem you are talking about efficiently while showing respect.

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      • #18
        I am

        probably the youngest person, or one of them, that still says sir or ma'am when talking to people. Being only 24, I get a lot of strange looks when I say it to people. However, it's how I grew up. I was raised to respect women, my elders, and pretty much everyone. I try to respect those I come in contact with at work, even when it gets very hard to say 'sir.' I don't see, in reference to the earlier post, how doing so to an LEO is hierarchical at all. They refer to me in the same manner.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by dougo83 View Post
          probably the youngest person, or one of them, that still says sir or ma'am when talking to people. Being only 24, I get a lot of strange looks when I say it to people. However, it's how I grew up. I was raised to respect women, my elders, and pretty much everyone. I try to respect those I come in contact with at work, even when it gets very hard to say 'sir.' I don't see, in reference to the earlier post, how doing so to an LEO is hierarchical at all. They refer to me in the same manner.
          It is darn good practice! Even in a use of force scenario, yell "Sir" or "Ma'am" really loud. When LE is investigating the incident, you want all of the witnesses to tell them you were professional, even when taking someone into custody.

          Be Safe,

          Hank
          " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

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