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  • Good Police Officer

    I was working a detail Sunday morning at a Electric Compamy Generating
    Plant. I was in my uniform.

    About 0200 hours a police officer drove through the gate at the
    plant, just to check on my well being. Nice Guy. Asked if I was okay,
    and wanted to know if I wanted coffee.

    I read posting too many times about bad Cops. Just to let you know
    there are good police officers. I think it helps if as I did call him sir,
    and address him as Officer.

    By the way for you Ford Lovers, the cruiser was a Dodge
    http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

  • #2
    Originally posted by copelandamuffy View Post
    I was working a detail Sunday morning at a Electric Compamy Generating
    Plant. I was in my uniform.

    About 0200 hours a police officer drove through the gate at the
    plant, just to check on my well being. Nice Guy. Asked if I was okay,
    and wanted to know if I wanted coffee.

    I read posting too many times about bad Cops. Just to let you know
    there are good police officers. I think it helps if as I did call him sir,
    and address him as Officer.

    By the way for you Ford Lovers, the cruiser was a Dodge
    I had one do that too - made a good impression. I wish there were more like them though. I noticed on a police forum that they were pleading for other officers to check in for safety when they observe another officer on a traffic stop. I would do that from a distance, but I'm sure some cop would get bent out of shape and tell me to leave. So, I don't bother.
    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
      I had one do that too - made a good impression. I wish there were more like them though. I noticed on a police forum that they were pleading for other officers to check in for safety when they observe another officer on a traffic stop. I would do that from a distance, but I'm sure some cop would get bent out of shape and tell me to leave. So, I don't bother.
      Good idea. The cop needs to focus his attention on the people in the vehicle. He should not have to worry that some want-a-be (no offense to you because I know you are not one), with who knows what training.
      I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
      Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

      Comment


      • #4
        Years back as a new patrol officer we were encouraged to make our presence known on night duties (I worked Fridays and Saturdays only) to check on any known hot spots (trouble) and to let them know we were in the area. It was appreciated by the Duty Officer who know that if we reported something (large group forming in a public park) we could give them all a heads up. When I attended Burglaries with my own company, staff were always told to offer the cops a coffee in winter as often they are waiting for forensics or the owner to arrive and that simple coffee (we had thermos of hot water always) breachs the gap between LEO and just another security wannabe.
        "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by copelandamuffy View Post
          I was working a detail Sunday morning at a Electric Compamy Generating
          Plant. I was in my uniform.

          About 0200 hours a police officer drove through the gate at the
          plant, just to check on my well being. Nice Guy. Asked if I was okay,
          and wanted to know if I wanted coffee.

          I read posting too many times about bad Cops. Just to let you know
          there are good police officers. I think it helps if as I did call him sir,
          and address him as Officer.

          By the way for you Ford Lovers, the cruiser was a Dodge
          The only thing I would recommend is not to call him/her "sir", as it tends to reinforce a hierarchy that does not exist.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hmmmmmmmmmmm I have always referred to our police by their rank or if dealing with an Inspector (Sir level) or higher used their rank and surname. Most insist I call them by their first names but for sake of asking for them or making telephone calls I have always used their ranks and full titles. I have been stopped for RBT (breath testing) and have also been stopped at random only to show a bit of respect to get away with a caution or a lesser fine.
            "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

            Comment


            • #7
              I call everyone sir or ma'am unless they request not to be. Regardless of any "hierarchy" that does or does not exist. It's called respect. Actually, as I think about it, the last person I was fighting with I commanded, "Sir, stop resisiting." Ive even called kids sir.
              "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
              "The Curve" 1998

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              • #8
                Don't get me wrong; I'm not suggesting that anyone should be disrespectful towards a police officer (or to any other person, for that matter). I'm simply suggesting that the use of "sir" should be discouraged because of the problem facing the security industry, which is that they are perceived as lower on the totem pole than police, when in fact there are two poles that just happen to be built next to each other. I think that using their rank would be equally respectful and would avoid the "one totem pole" perspective from flourishing.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bigshotceo View Post
                  Don't get me wrong; I'm not suggesting that anyone should be disrespectful towards a police officer (or to any other person, for that matter). I'm simply suggesting that the use of "sir" should be discouraged because of the problem facing the security industry, which is that they are perceived as lower on the totem pole than police, when in fact there are two poles that just happen to be built next to each other. I think that using their rank would be equally respectful and would avoid the "one totem pole" perspective from flourishing.
                  I just simply disagree with this analysis. Sir should always be used when speaking to a male and ma'am to a female. Regardless of any totem poles out there.
                  "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                  "The Curve" 1998

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    BHR, I completely agree. I use sir or ma'am even when I'm talking to punks or vagrants. "This is private property sir. I need you to leave now."
                    As you said, it's not about heirarchy, it's about basic respect. It's also CYA - if a situation escalates, I have no doubt that I went out of my way to be respectful and appropriate, and I know that I did not instigate.

                    I find that I can accomplish at least as much, if not more, by extending courtesy and respect at all times. And as far as police officers go, I do have an increased respect for them. Not because I'm a lowly security guard, but because they do have authority vested by the state/feds and because in most cases their background checks and training are more rigorous. There are of course exceptions to every rule. But I have never had any police officer treat me as just a security guard, or dismiss my observations.
                    That's a direct quote. Not word for word, but the gist of it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I found that being polite and using "sir" or "ma'am" pays dividends. I address my adult children the same way I did when they were little, ma'am or sir and they me, heard me address my wife in the same manner, yes ma'am or no ma'am. As a police officer, military or civilian, the word sir and being polite had its amusing moments as when I arrested one poor soul and got him a cup of coffee and a donut because I knew he was hungry. At the preliminary hearing he addressed the judge, "Dis officer is messing wid my mind, he wanted me to tell him all kinds of tings." The judge asked him why he thought that way? "This officer is the kindest m-f I ever seen, he kept saying sir all the time and asked if I wus ok and give me something to drink and food, and judge I knowed he wanted me to tell him stuff even though he'd never said so and no odder police ever did that to me." The judge smiled and remanded him to social services to get him dried out. When I left Ohio, he was working for Good Will and did not fall off the wagon.
                      Civil and polite do not necessarily equate to the same thing. We can make our jobs a lot easier by being both and contrary to perceived thought, it does not make us look weak.
                      Enjoy the day,
                      Bill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
                        I just simply disagree with this analysis. Sir should always be used when speaking to a male and ma'am to a female. Regardless of any totem poles out there.
                        Lawson is quite right. I always use the words "sir" or "ma'am" when dealing with everyone, regardless of what place they hold in society. Most often, I get called "sir" as well. It's just good manners my parents taught me.....

                        Be Safe,

                        Hank
                        " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I address everyone in the above similar fashoions, Sir, Ma'am... I am sometimes confronted with the; "Don't call me MA'AM!" or "Dont call me SIR I work for a living dammit!" At which point I will explain that that is how I was raised, and I only do it out of respect, then I inquire how they wish to be respctfully addressed.

                          9/10 you will know right off the bat if someone is playing on the Hollyer Than Thou side of things, and can act accordingly and professional. If they want to carry on like an ass, hey fine by me. I know I am being respectful and that they are being an ass.
                          Last edited by ValleyOne; 11-05-2007, 11:54 AM. Reason: dang keys are too cose together
                          ~Super Ninja Sniper~
                          Corbier's Commandos

                          Nemo me impune lacessit

                          Grammical and Spelling errors may occur form time to time. Yoov bin worned

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                          • #14
                            I have always used the Sir and Ma'am when reffering to individuals, and Officer(Surname if known) or their rank(if known) when dealing with uniformed individuals(ie: police) However, since I usually get to know everyone and we speak quite a bit it usually gets to first names withing a few minutes unless we are working with others around.

                            Generally when I see the local LEO's come on site I will check in with them and offer coffee since we always have it on hand, and I always offer a quick your of our site just in case something happens they know where they need to go when I call. I must say we have a great local police department, even if they do have a reputation as having "no sense of humor"
                            Never be afraid to try new things. Remember, amatures built the Ark while professionals built the Titanic.

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                            • #15
                              [QUOTE=ValleyOne;44511]"Dont call me SIR I work for a living dammit!"QUOTE]

                              That setence means you just ran into a current or former Non-commissioned officer...

                              You'll hear that from me on ocassion.

                              I refer to everyone respectfully sir/maam to try to prevent escalation of a situation.
                              Overmotivated and Underpaid... I'm a Security supervisors wet dream...

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