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  • #31
    Originally posted by Jeremy View Post
    I'd like to share an update to my original post.

    Today was Day #1 of my promise to myself to recommit to the job.

    I just returned from doing a thorough building tour and parking lot tour. I'll be doing another building / parking lot tour in about an hour and a half.

    I started a blank shift report today. And made entries for a delivery that occured. I also made entries for keys that were picked up by an employee and another entry for papers that were picked up by an employee of my contract company. I recorded the exact times of the cleaners arriving and where they were in the building. While on tour I checked the temperatures of the data rooms and telephone room. I locked 2 storage closets that I don't usually check. I also checked the designated smoking area. I checked all the bathrooms, and walked down each row of cubicles. I checked the elevator rooms, electrical rooms. I poked my head and looked around each training room.

    The funny thing is, as bad as I was doing before, the 1st and second shift officers at our other building messed up today and prompted an angry memo from the client threatening to replace us with another company =(....If that ever happens, I'd just ask the new company to hire me. But today has been good so far. I'm trying to use the internet less and less and look at the cameras more.
    Nice, keep it up. Cover your butt with those shift reports and whatever other reports that you do. Not sure what your chain of command is like there, but if I were you I would keep plugging away and look at the problems with the account as an opportunity.

    Like I said in the first post I made in this thread- if supervision is lacking at your post, that could be an opportunity for you. Yes I am opportunistic and aggressively ambitious. Being a better security officer than your own supervisor means that when management looks at everyones shift reports, yours will demonstrate that you are making a substantial contribution towards keeping that account. That can mean allot. You know the particulars better than anyone else. Don't be afraid to be the best. Everything is a competition.

    btw...I post here often from work (before or immediately after my shift, to help the transition between home-mode and work-mode) so if my attitude is a little intense, its because I am in "work mode". In other words, no offense meant in that first post I made this thread.
    formerly C&A

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    • #32
      When I joined 1 company I naturally looked at the log book to find 6 months where nothing actually happened. All it said was 0645 S/O JOHN JONES ON DUTY then later 1745 S/O JOHN JONES OFF DUTY. No keys were ever issued and there were no deliveries. On my first shift I made a 3 line entry of being onsite, receiving master keys and key card and commencing duty with no alarms active - it was the most written in 6 months with no audits from any company manager. The S/O's I worked with just said "oh we never write anything down".

      When this company lost their contract I was asked to stay on but declined as I was a relief person who only wanted 1-2 weeks a month at the most so agreed to train and audit the SOP's. On another site I had a full on argument with a partner S/O when the site alarm was deactivated and I recorded for a staff member to use the ATM in the foyer and reactivated 30 minutes later. He told me I did not know SOP's and then I replied that is why he is level 1 and I was a level 4. I pointed to the SOP's and suggested he read them only to recall 1 of the major issues on the shift reports - record all alarm activities.
      "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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      • #33
        Well, i work a Corp Site doing my 2 rounds during my graveyard shift. but i have a Patrolman status with my security company where i can be used at other sites so my work week can change drasticly. it can go from quiet corp facility to war zone down the street in just a phone call. remain ontop of your training, keep sharp. even tho you think nothings going to happen on your shift somthing may and your pants are going to be so far down it will lead you to a swift write-Up.

        Any seasioned officer will say that things go on when you some times least expect it, so my advice..... Expect anything. shine up your boots and badge, make sure your duty belt is on right and be ready to kick ass when needed.
        sigpic

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        • #34
          Jeremy, I'm glad you're starting to take it more seriously. I have learned that you will only be as proud of your job as what you put into it. If you "phone it in" every day, then you'll wonder why you're stuck being just a security guard and a boring site. If you choose to see yourself as a professional, and act professionally at all times, then you will start to take pride in and ownership of your performance, regardless of how active or quiet the site is.

          As others have said, always report everything that happens. Remember, it is not our job to decide what is important and what is not. That's up to the company, manager, and sometimes legal system. It is our job to secure the site and report all facts and factual details. Report any time you make or receive a phone call, any time a supervisor is on post, any time you touch a key or door.

          This sounds like an excellent opportunity for you to step up. If there is a leadership vacuum, fill it. Do your required patrols, and if you get bored, do more. Walking is a good way to wake yourself up and sharpen your focus. Change up your patrols. Don't do them at the same times or in the same patterns. Just because nothing has happened, doesn't mean it will stay that way.

          Don't be afraid to get a little brown on your nose. "Hey Boss, would you look at my report and tell me what I need to add?" Don't be an all out suck-up, but use your superiors' and co-workers' knowledge to your advantage.

          Mostly, though, keep trying to improve yourself daily. If you take it as seriously as you say, it will fall into place with hard work and willingness to learn.
          That's a direct quote. Not word for word, but the gist of it.

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          • #35
            Good job on the change in attitude. I think you will be pleasantly surprised at the outcome.
            "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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            • #36
              I've only been on duty for 2 hours and 55 minutes, and my shift report is already like 3 paragraphs so far. Alot of activity. I was wondering if I over-did it...I recorded manual access of doors with name of person and time... issued and returned temp badges and parking badges... I was even proactively watching the cameras, and told someone to move their car out of a reserved spot and saved them a violation notice. I wrote a parking violation for someone else today and was ontop of the reserved spaces.

              Yeah I'm sending this report directly to my manager and asking for feedback. If I continue, I'll be building a solid record that could lead to a direct position with the pharmaceutical company's in-house security, maybe.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Jeremy View Post
                I've only been on duty for 2 hours and 55 minutes, and my shift report is already like 3 paragraphs so far. Alot of activity. I was wondering if I over-did it...I recorded manual access of doors with name of person and time... issued and returned temp badges and parking badges... I was even proactively watching the cameras, and told someone to move their car out of a reserved spot and saved them a violation notice. I wrote a parking violation for someone else today and was ontop of the reserved spaces.

                Yeah I'm sending this report directly to my manager and asking for feedback. If I continue, I'll be building a solid record that could lead to a direct position with the pharmaceutical company's in-house security, maybe.
                There you go. Can't ever be too much information as long as you are concise and accurate. Occurrences that are legal, normal, safe and are of 0 threat, you probably want to summarize and leave the details out.
                formerly C&A

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                • #38
                  I had to school some S/Os once on a site about "useless information." They told me that they didn't like that I was logging when Pizza Delivery people arrived and left. They said it was "useless information and was irrelevant."

                  I basically had to explain to him that we need to log who is on our site and where. For instance if we, on our next patrol find a sign has been knocked over by a car, we can check all the employee's cars for damage, but what if it was the pizza guy no one knows about? On the reverse side, lets say someone says someone performed a hit and run out on a public street at 1245 in a car matching that of the delivery boy. If our reports show that he was on our site at that time, it can help HIS legal defense if they get a hold of that report.

                  Theres hardly anything that isnt worth logging for some reason or another.
                  "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                  "The Curve" 1998

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                  • #39
                    So easy, a caveman could do it !!
                    K9...."Protect all who enter"

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                    • #40
                      Speaking of easy jobs...I had a detail tonight where I had to post at a building whos mag locks weren't working. All night. Sat in the vehicle at the front doors maybe an hour out of the whole shift. Spent the rest walking or riding around the building. Made a numbered list of security issues/potential safety hazards in the building, and suggested corrections. Got a "fire evacuation" diagram off the wall, made a copy of it, put the original back. On the copy I put the numbers from the list at the correct locations, circled them in red. Stapled that to my other daily paperwork and turned it in at the end of the shift. Always room for creativity, even in the most seemingly boring and stifling of details.
                      formerly C&A

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                      • #41
                        The easiest/boringest post I ever had was an empty warehouse. The building was steel and had running water and power. It was in the middle of a lot that was completely paved. The perimeter had a ten foot chain link fence with razor wire at the top. There were no reports to fill out. And by no reports I mean there weren't even any forms. The client, and I spoke with him personally, didn't care if we brought in a cot and slept, or didn't show up at all. He just wanted the reciept to show the insurance company, as it was cheaper to do it that way. this site was 24/7. I normally brought a chair, TV, hot plate, food and some reading material. I still made rounds, but as long as I was there, the only thing that happened was shift change. Almost forgot: There was an old rotary phone that we called the office on every hour for a welfare check.
                        "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
                          I had to school some S/Os once on a site about "useless information." They told me that they didn't like that I was logging when Pizza Delivery people arrived and left. They said it was "useless information and was irrelevant."

                          I basically had to explain to him that we need to log who is on our site and where. For instance if we, on our next patrol find a sign has been knocked over by a car, we can check all the employee's cars for damage, but what if it was the pizza guy no one knows about? On the reverse side, lets say someone says someone performed a hit and run out on a public street at 1245 in a car matching that of the delivery boy. If our reports show that he was on our site at that time, it can help HIS legal defense if they get a hold of that report.

                          Theres hardly anything that isnt worth logging for some reason or another.
                          If something turned up missing or damaged, or someone was attacked in a restroom or something, you would know who had been in the building. If a fire broke out or you had a bombing, you can assume employees had been in the building, and may be missing. But without the log, who would look there for the pizza guy?
                          sigpic
                          Rocket Science
                          Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                          http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                          One Man's Opinion

                          The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by cocknaces View Post
                            Speaking of easy jobs...I had a detail tonight where I had to post at a building whos mag locks weren't working. All night. Sat in the vehicle at the front doors maybe an hour out of the whole shift. Spent the rest walking or riding around the building. Made a numbered list of security issues/potential safety hazards in the building, and suggested corrections. Got a "fire evacuation" diagram off the wall, made a copy of it, put the original back. On the copy I put the numbers from the list at the correct locations, circled them in red. Stapled that to my other daily paperwork and turned it in at the end of the shift. Always room for creativity, even in the most seemingly boring and stifling of details.

                            Curious, couldn't someone have snuck in while you were driving around the building or off making copies? But anyway, was there not a way to lock the doors mechanically and use a different door? I always have my customers keep the mechanical lock on and re-key it, just in case. You never know when lightning might hit, something may cause a power outage for an extended period beyond battery capacity, or someother failure. It is electronics, after all.
                            sigpic
                            Rocket Science
                            Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                            http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                            One Man's Opinion

                            The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Andy Taylor View Post
                              The easiest/boringest post I ever had was an empty warehouse. The building was steel and had running water and power. It was in the middle of a lot that was completely paved. The perimeter had a ten foot chain link fence with razor wire at the top. There were no reports to fill out. And by no reports I mean there weren't even any forms. The client, and I spoke with him personally, didn't care if we brought in a cot and slept, or didn't show up at all. He just wanted the reciept to show the insurance company, as it was cheaper to do it that way. this site was 24/7. I normally brought a chair, TV, hot plate, food and some reading material. I still made rounds, but as long as I was there, the only thing that happened was shift change. Almost forgot: There was an old rotary phone that we called the office on every hour for a welfare check.
                              Sounds like my dream site.

                              I've often spoke reverently about my perfect site:

                              An abandoned missile silo....20 miles down a dirt road, behind 12 rows of electrified razor wire. No employees, public, or federal officers to visit...Has working bathroom, power, a microwave, fridge, nice desk and wi-fi (last part negotiable; I have a library of books)...Four 10-hour shifts weekly, at my current pay rate, with paid travel time for that dirt road. Alternatively, a secure, site-specific parking lot at the other end of the road and a vehicle for that drive in.

                              Dare to dream!

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by JSam21 View Post
                                Its stuff like this that kinda ticks me off a bit. "I'm suposed to do 3 patrols, but I can get away with one." Wrong... Do your job!! Its what the client is paying the contract for. If you don't want to walk around all night that's fine but at least do you minimum patrols.
                                I don't believe in just meeting my client's expectations. I exceed them - every day.
                                The last place I worked where there were recorded rounds was at Lakewood Cemetery in Minneapolis. The rounds started when the gates were locked until 0600. We were supposed to make one round each hour, which took about 15 minutes by car if you drove slow. Most guards made the rounds on the hour, taking 10-15 minutes each time. Then they parked by the main gate until the next round. You could set your watch by those guys.
                                I made continuous rounds once the gates were locked. I drove very slow since I drove with my lights off 99% of the time and didn't want to hit any markers. I'd hit a key or two, then stop and sit on the hood of the squad for a few minutes and scan the area with my night vision scope. Then maybe I'd double back and hit the two keys I just did, and hit the last key and work backwards, stopping to check mausoleum doors and open graves and scan around with my night vision. I kept this up my entire shift. I rarely parked at the gate, except to meet the Field Supervisor when he came by to visit.
                                At first, the POC complained that my Detex tapes were so hard to read compared to the other guards. He changed his mind after I explained the method to my madness. In fact, I found out later that the POC quit reviewing my tapes because he knew I was doing my job.
                                "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

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