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  • #16
    4 minutes is the departement standard response time for emergency calls. last year we responded in 4 minutes or less to 96% of our emergency calls and we had 3789 such calls last year. i.e Fights in Progress, Person with weapon, Fire Alarms, Combative patients, etc. We had a total of about 181000 total calls for service last year.
    "You gotta look like Rico Suave, Think like Einstein and, only if that fails...fight like Tyson." -Dougo83's FTO

    Me- "Should we call the police?" My FTO- "Justin, here, we are the police. Go get em."

    Originally posted by Black Caesar
    some people just need killin!!!!! (Or Tasing, or pepper spraying or whatever).

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    • #17
      I have been a trainee in the nuclear security field...
      Red flag. Maybe I am paranoid but this smells like NRC fodder.

      Jeremy, if you are serious about everything you said....ask to be put on more a challenging site. Personally I can't stand to be bored at work. No challenge imo also means almost no opportunity to advance. If you are working your way up to be a Nuclear Security Officer, your going to want to be an absolute hall-of-fame
      S/O at the vanilla post you are at at now.

      Master your post orders and do everything you possibly can within those post orders to make sure your area of responsibility is 110% squared away while you are on duty. If supervision at your site is lacking, that is an opportunity for you. Form an idea of what security SHOULD be like at the site and- without violating post orders or your employers policy- follow that idea. There is actually allot you could probably do. If you do it and don't move up in that account, you will probably be seen as too valuable to just let rot there and could be moved to a better position at a more challenging site.

      Challenge yourself, challenge your supervisors (in a productive way!). Never settle for mediocrity.
      Last edited by junkyarddog; 10-27-2007, 03:00 AM.
      formerly C&A

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      • #18
        Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
        Yep, wading into a fight alone is not smart, nor is it in the scope of a lot of security officer's duties. If you have gotten injured, most companies and responding cops would regard it as your fault.

        I would call the police and possibly yell at them to quit fighting from a safe distance (this often has worked actually).

        The only way that I am physically intervening is if it is a company employee or a cop involved. Otherwise, let the drunks duke it out. They will tire themselves out soon enough.
        I use a bull horn equipped with a siren - works great!
        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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        • #19
          Jeremy:

          I salute you and commend you for seeing your possible error of your ways.
          You seems as though a person who once shown the light of day, will make
          out to be good Officer. Any person who admits they goofed deserves a "tip of the hat". Good work.


          The mere fact that you did check in with us is a sign of a good Officer.


          The worse thing that can happen in our business is " all secure, nothing to report" During the winter months at our post and site the place is like a morgue. That is why on those days, I reread the post orders or Security Officer Hand Book. And yes do an extra patrol. Boredom and fatigue is something we have to fight on quiet posts.

          I would talk to your site manager about how you could do a better job on patrols. Doing an a-ok check with the other Officer in the other building two to three times a night. If he or she fluffs you off, I'd make a note of this
          in your personnal notes for future reference.

          Jeremy do stay till 2300 hours, and do two patrols. At least when you go home at night you can sleep better knowing you did your part to provide good security.

          There are posts and sites where it is okay to for Guards to be on the Internet. Keep it clean. Never know who is going to stop by at 2200 hours

          Keep checking in from time to time. There are a lot of us old f*arts who would glad to help.
          http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

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          • #20
            I have worked alone most of my career. I am expected to break up fights alone. Police response time is lobg. It is one of the reasons why in alonther post I mentioned that I stay friendly with the staff. The Maintenance man, Bellboy etc are my backup.
            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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            • #21
              I look at walking patrol as exercise time. Sure its the same thing day after day, but I"m getting a workout (up and down stairs) and don't have to hit the gym. And it may not be often, but stuff does happen. One day I was walking down a hallway I"d been down not twenty minutes earlier and I hear an odd noise. Go around the corner and water is just pouring from the ceiling. Can you imagine if that had been running for hours instead of minutes? Of course the maintenance guys seemed more annoyed than thankful, but I was happy.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by craig333 View Post
                Of course the maintenance guys seemed more annoyed than thankful, but I was happy.
                Probably just at the situation, not at you. Nobody wants to clean up a mess at all. Nobody thinks about how big a mess it would be later.
                sigpic
                Rocket Science
                Making everything else look simple, since 1958.


                http://my.opera.com/integrator/blog/
                One Man's Opinion

                The Future. It isn't what it used to be.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Jeremy View Post
                  I have been a trainee in the nuclear security field, and am currently working in unarmed contract security. I've been at 3 different sites that our company has contracts for, and the post I am assigned to now has got to be the easiest security job ever. I know most of you guys here have busy jobs that come with alot of responsibility. Some of you are also EMTs, you may have arrest powers or carry weapons, have multiple buildings to patrol several times a shift or you may drive security vehicles.

                  Our contract is with a pharmaceutical company. They have us under contract to provide security for two buildings on the campus. It is a 5 officer site. Two officers and the site manager on first shift, and two officers on second shift. Each officer is assigned to one of the two buildings, so we don't rotate and we rarely travel to eachother's buildings. I'm on the second shift (3pm to 11pm) and I might talk to the other officer about once a week. There is no graveyard shift, since the main campus security drives around, they are able to respond to alarms in our buildings and watch it during the midnight hours. We have all holidays off (they aren't paid though), and a week off for christmas. There is virtually no overtime here unless an officer quits.

                  90% of my shift is spent at the security desk in the lobby. The desk is equipped with a printer and computer which has the alarm monitoring software and software to issue and modify access badges. There are two monitors and a joystick pad for the Pan Tilt and Zoom cameras that are in the building and outside. And there is a refridgerator and microwave (that I purchased and added )

                  Is is very laid back here. Most of the time I just copy and paste the same shift report, but I just change the date. The minimum tours are supposed to be 2 inside, 1 outside. But most of the time I can get away with doing just 1 tour per shift, inside. I usually do the tour at 10:20, and leave to go home early at 10:40. It is a 3 story office building, and I only have to lock about 12 rooms.

                  From 3 to 6 is when I see the most "action". A few visitors might need to be let out of the lobby (it is a closed lobby with turnstiles) or I may have to sign out a parking pass or two.

                  When I think about the time I spend doing actual security work, its not that much at all. Probably 30 minutes during a whole shift. Everyone is gone from the building at about 6.

                  The fountain soda machine in the cafateria is usually on, and the computer at my desk has internet access. I'm typing this post on it right now. So thats what keeps me from getting bored - the internet.

                  So can anyone top this? Do you have it easier than me?

                  Edit: The site is located 4.6 miles from my apartment too!
                  I think I've got you beaten. I do armed security at a check cashing store that is about a 3 minute walk from my apartment (I can see the place from my apartment). Basically I am responsible for the building and its parking lot (about 1 acre total). Really, the only tough part of my job is that it is 7 days a week (in fact, haven't had a day off since October 22 2006, and that was to attend my grandmother's funeral). As for the actual job, on a typical day, the most action I ever get is getting customers who are improperly parked to move their cars (this is where my police officer appearace comes in handy ). In the entire year plus I've been working there, I've had two incidents that I had to write reports for (1 was for a customer who was arrested for trying to cash a fake check and the other was for when the husband of one the employees intentionally rammed her car with his truck one night). Another time, I had to stop what nearly escalated into a fight between a woman and her boyfriend behind the building (the two were not customers; they just happened to be near the building when all that happened). So, besides having to get people to move their cars every day, I have had a total of three incidents in 14 months. There is no set requirement for how often I patrol the parking lot, so I just try to do it randomly, so that in the event someone may be trying to case the place, they can't predict when I'll be outside. When I'm not outside patrolling, I'm either inside keeping an eye on things or reading the newspaper (I love the sudoku puzzles). A typical day is probably about 50% down time and 50% working time.

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                  • #24
                    Maybe I'm missing something but...I have very little "down time". LOL! I have Operations meetings 3 days a week. Then I am in the field 5 nights a week. Not including meetings with local LE and community / crime prevention meetings. LOL!

                    Be Safe,

                    Hank
                    " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

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                    • #25
                      I worked security for a major medical insurance company for a couple of months and we had a similar setup, boring as hell. we had to go over to the other building from time to time on third shift, but that was the only time we had to leave the building since during the other two shifts we had guard in each location.

                      But we never did a copy and paste report. Learn to write. Use different words that mean the same. Buy a thesarus if you have to, but switch things up. It will improve your mind and being able to write a good report can be an invaluable skill.

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                      • #26
                        During the Y2k BS I would work CPP and escort the 3 execs to foreign and domestic meetings. I would bring in a baby sitter whom I paid a cash premium to come and sit in my chair and do as you please for 3 x 10 hour days. He had a choice of random review of telephone recordings, smacking a few of the contract security staff in the head for sleeping in patrol cars (we HAD a remote camera network (perhaps a backup) a seperate system in case of terrorist attack or high risk incidents).

                        My friend would just do the daily stuff as I ramped up for the CPP stuff (and I know he would bring his own reports to do with his PI work) as it was alot of boring stuff usually. TV and video were in my office as well as private dunny, shower and sofa bed which is designed for the regular 12 hour days.
                        "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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                        • #27
                          I used to be lucky to work within a 5 minute drive radius of 4 sites which meant I would often do 1 of my relief shifts on 1 of these sites (I accepted it or past it on to another staffer) and often would walk home if I did not want to drive or had car issues.
                          "Keep your friends close and your enemies even closer" Sun Tzu

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by cocknaces View Post
                            Red flag. Maybe I am paranoid but this smells like NRC fodder.
                            Yeah I was a trainee....passed all the tests and 6 weeks of classroom training. Passed the weapons tests too and scored average on AR15 / Beretta tests. I was about to start on the job training when the medical department came back and said "We can't clear him until he takes a nuclear cardiology test. His pulse is too high". Then the site manager at the plant said "Jeremy, if you look tired or inattentive in class 1 more time, you're fired." At the time I was going between working at this job, and training for the nuke site. So I wasn't getting much sleep. Combined with the fact that I'm overweight and lacking energy...... I had no choice but to resign and not continue with that job at the present time.

                            When I get back into good physical shape, they said they would rehire me. If I was in shape I'd have no problem staying awake or getting through medical.

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                            • #29
                              I'd like to share an update to my original post.

                              Today was Day #1 of my promise to myself to recommit to the job.

                              I just returned from doing a thorough building tour and parking lot tour. I'll be doing another building / parking lot tour in about an hour and a half.

                              I started a blank shift report today. And made entries for a delivery that occured. I also made entries for keys that were picked up by an employee and another entry for papers that were picked up by an employee of my contract company. I recorded the exact times of the cleaners arriving and where they were in the building. While on tour I checked the temperatures of the data rooms and telephone room. I locked 2 storage closets that I don't usually check. I also checked the designated smoking area. I checked all the bathrooms, and walked down each row of cubicles. I checked the elevator rooms, electrical rooms. I poked my head and looked around each training room.

                              The funny thing is, as bad as I was doing before, the 1st and second shift officers at our other building messed up today and prompted an angry memo from the client threatening to replace us with another company =(....If that ever happens, I'd just ask the new company to hire me. But today has been good so far. I'm trying to use the internet less and less and look at the cameras more.
                              Last edited by Jeremy; 10-29-2007, 08:50 PM.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Jeremy View Post
                                Yeah I was a trainee....passed all the tests and 6 weeks of classroom training. Passed the weapons tests too and scored average on AR15 / Beretta tests. I was about to start on the job training when the medical department came back and said "We can't clear him until he takes a nuclear cardiology test. His pulse is too high". Then the site manager at the plant said "Jeremy, if you look tired or inattentive in class 1 more time, you're fired." At the time I was going between working at this job, and training for the nuke site. So I wasn't getting much sleep. Combined with the fact that I'm overweight and lacking energy...... I had no choice but to resign and not continue with that job at the present time.

                                When I get back into good physical shape, they said they would rehire me. If I was in shape I'd have no problem staying awake or getting through medical.
                                Sounds like good incentive to get in shape. Considering what has been going on with a certain security company that has recently lost all of its contracts with the nuclear generation industry, the issues involved etc. I would not be surprised to see an NRC investigation stumble its way onto an informal internet security message board. Inattentiveness is the very last thing they want to see in any current or potential nuclear security officer. For good reason. Keep trying and good luck.
                                formerly C&A

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