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security guards considered private police officers in ohio

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  • ContractSec Level III
    replied
    Sorry I was looking up another topic from this forum about private police. It seemed interesting. And I saw this thread as a another search result. I didn't know that this thread was old.

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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by Pop pop View Post
    LOL, this little thread is three years old. GuardSSC you should be an Investigator. A good investigator has great patience.

    Ooops. I mean ContractSec Level III.
    They are not the same person.

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  • Pop pop
    replied
    LOL, this little thread is three years old. GuardSSC you should be an Investigator. A good investigator has great patience.

    Ooops. I mean ContractSec Level III.

    Leave a comment:


  • zm88
    replied
    Holy thread resurrection eh?

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  • ContractSec Level III
    replied
    Well in my state. Impersonating a security guard is a Class A misdemeanor. And assaulting a security guard carries the same punishment as assaulting a police officer.

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by OccamsRazor View Post
    I thought it was another one...I distinctly remember the instructor saying it was a law school, which was really funny to his way of thinking, as you'd need a lot of guns to protect future attorneys....Though he used some other words for "lawyer" and "attorney".

    LOL, I can bet what some of those words were

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
    City College of San Francisco. my sister worked there for a short time years ago before getting the job with the Sheriff's Dept. Here is a fairly recent article about them.
    I thought it was another one...I distinctly remember the instructor saying it was a law school, which was really funny to his way of thinking, as you'd need a lot of guns to protect future attorneys....Though he used some other words for "lawyer" and "attorney".

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    [QUOTE=bpdblue;46510]I tell you that some of the stuff you guys post about other states and what is allowed just blows my mind. (I'm from California ).

    I'm in Texas, where things are pretty straight forward regarding police, security, public safety in general compared to lots of other places (don't get me started on Florida). I look at other states and feel the same way. Even California.

    http://www.post.ca.gov/About_Us/What_is_POST.asp
    http://www.post.ca.gov/library/other/agency_page.asp

    The POST program is voluntary and incentive-based.
    Voluntary? i've never heard of such a thing anywhere else.

    I will also add that alot of the rules for allowing some of these things (like being the "private police") are probably based on old laws, and sooner or later somebody is going to screw it up for the rest of you, and that stuff will become ancient history.
    Some are old rules, but much if it is relativley new law.

    Although I will admit that there are some wierd practices here also, like PATROL SPECIALS (I think that's what their called) in the city and county of San Francisco, which is itself a one and only, as the only city and county in one, in our lovely little state of over 35,000,000 people. You know how there always has to be the one wierd one in the group.

    To give a little background on the Patrol Specials, they are allowed to PURCHASE little chunks of San Francisco as their area to provide service in, and to sell security services to anyone in that little chunk of town. They wear full SFPD uniforms, and drive FULLY marked and equipped SFPD patrol cars. They have to go through the SFPD police academy, but they do not work for SFPD. To be honest, I don't fully comprehend it myself, but they are even listed in the California penal code as legal.
    Patrol Specials aren't really unique, just really really uncommon outside of the East Coast. To me they are kind of like New York Constables.

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by OccamsRazor View Post
    Isn't there also that law school in SF where the security guards have peace officer status, but can't carry weapons? I heard about that in the academy.
    City College of San Francisco. my sister worked there for a short time years ago before getting the job with the Sheriff's Dept. Here is a fairly recent article about them.

    Campus Police Chief Resigns

    Iowa University Police officers just recently started carrying firearms (Article here), and the Columbus State Community college's President recently dis-armed her campus police force. (Article here, because we all know that during a life and death critical incident, it's better to rely on a city police force that is coming in from off campus and doesn't know the layout of the college than it is to have your own Police academy trained force that knows the campus like the back of their hands...... ). Her rationale being that "guns in the hands of campus cops don't prevent violent crime".

    Well, by that thinking we should disarm everyone, because millions of guns in the hands of the people, the cops and private security don't prevent violent crimes either .....

    This uncommon but not rare. Colleges and universities are bastions of "Anarcho-Liberal Think" when it comes to anything "Authoritarian" (like cops). in 1967 when the Texas Education Code was amended to allow for the creation of campus police, several facualty groups protested loudly that "guns in the academic environment would lead to violence". 40 years of Campus Policing in Texas and our colleges are just fine.
    Last edited by Black Caesar; 11-27-2007, 12:52 AM.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I remember seeing Kuffs on a flight from Singapore - after spending time laughing so much watching the Mr Bean episodes a few times. Shocking to think it is actually a true account of the Patrol Specials who purchased these regional policing services many years ago. When I first hit SF I had to check this out for myself ................. yep it was true and I took them as being a version of a sheriffs department initially.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
    I tell you that some of the stuff you guys post about other states and what is allowed just blows my mind. (I'm from California )
    Isn't there also that law school in SF where the security guards have peace officer status, but can't carry weapons? I heard about that in the academy.

    Don't forget the Washoe Tribal PD, who are sworn BIA officers, and cross-commissioned as Nevada peace officers, but had to get a special provision put in the CPC to merely drive into CA along the way to tribal lands, a provision that also specifically states they aren't considered peace officers by the state of California. I remember hearing from some of those guys how they used to have guys arrested by CHP (Can't Handle Policing) for driving into CA in their marked vehicles, on duty, on impersonation charges. I guess that's why the CPC was changed to allow that.
    Last edited by OccamsRazor; 11-26-2007, 11:29 PM.

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
    Although I will admit that there are some wierd practices here also, like PATROL SPECIALS (I think that's what their called) in the city and county of San Francisco, which is itself a one and only, as the only city and county in one, in our lovely little state of over 35,000,000 people. You know how there always has to be the one wierd one in the group.

    To give a little background on the Patrol Specials, they are allowed to PURCHASE little chunks of San Francisco as their area to provide service in, and to sell security services to anyone in that little chunk of town. They wear full SFPD uniforms, and drive FULLY marked and equipped SFPD patrol cars. They have to go through the SFPD police academy, but they do not work for SFPD. To be honest, I don't fully comprehend it myself, but they are even listed in the California penal code as legal.
    KUFFS. Loved that movie.

    Leave a comment:


  • bpdblue
    replied
    Wierd, just plain wierd.

    I tell you that some of the stuff you guys post about other states and what is allowed just blows my mind. (I'm from California )

    I will also add that alot of the rules for allowing some of these things (like being the "private police") are probably based on old laws, and sooner or later somebody is going to screw it up for the rest of you, and that stuff will become ancient history.

    Although I will admit that there are some wierd practices here also, like PATROL SPECIALS (I think that's what their called) in the city and county of San Francisco, which is itself a one and only, as the only city and county in one, in our lovely little state of over 35,000,000 people. You know how there always has to be the one wierd one in the group.

    To give a little background on the Patrol Specials, they are allowed to PURCHASE little chunks of San Francisco as their area to provide service in, and to sell security services to anyone in that little chunk of town. They wear full SFPD uniforms, and drive FULLY marked and equipped SFPD patrol cars. They have to go through the SFPD police academy, but they do not work for SFPD. To be honest, I don't fully comprehend it myself, but they are even listed in the California penal code as legal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    Originally posted by jer6141 View Post
    I worked at an amusement park in ohio and there's a mix of park police and security. Cedar point has park police, and Ive seen young guys up there with police on the patches. Kings Island has the same, with a destinction for security and police. Park Police wear navy tops, khaki pants and badges and patches all say park police. Cars say police, red and blue bar, but has a regular ohio plate which confuses me. The security officers dont carry much, wear white shirts and khaki pants, red light bars and security on the cars. But park police officers usually come from opota classes at scarlett oaks or butler tech, if they are smart.
    Your post was a trip in the wayback machine for me. Early in my career I worked for the Cedar Point Police Department. First in a 'non-bonded' security position and then in a 'bonded' position. The security officers at the amusement park have no powers of arrest and work along side of the bonded officers. The bonded officers are sworn (every year) under the jurisdiction of the city of Sandusky and have full powers of arrest and cite under the codes of the city.

    Because it is a private police force they have regular license plates on all of the PD vehicles. Their uniforms are close to the city of Sandusky and their patches say, 'Cedar Point Police Department' on them.

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  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by jer6141 View Post
    but has a regular ohio plate which confuses me.
    Most private law enforcement agencies out there roll with regular plates since they are not a government entity and not entitled to exempt plate status.

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