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security guards considered private police officers in ohio

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  • security guards considered private police officers in ohio

    I just notice something interesting in Ohio code a security guard is considered a private police officer under state law in ohio. For the purposes of the impersonating a police officer statute.

    2921.51 Impersonation of peace officer or private police officer.

    (A) As used in this section:
    (1) “Peace officer” means a sheriff, deputy sheriff, marshal, deputy marshal, member of the organized police department of a municipal corporation, or township constable, who is employed by a political subdivision of this state, a member of a police force employed by a metropolitan housing authority under division (D) of section 3735.31 of the Revised Code, a member of a police force employed by a regional transit authority under division (Y) of section 306.35 of the Revised Code, a state university law enforcement officer appointed under section 3345.04 of the Revised Code, a veterans’ home police officer appointed under section 5907.02 of the Revised Code, a special police officer employed by a port authority under section 4582.04 or 4582.28 of the Revised Code, or a state highway patrol trooper and whose primary duties are to preserve the peace, to protect life and property, and to enforce the laws, ordinances, or rules of the state or any of its political subdivisions.
    (2) “Private police officer” means any security guard, special police officer, private detective, or other person who is privately employed in a police capacity.
    (3) “Federal law enforcement officer” means an employee of the United States who serves in a position the duties of which are primarily the investigation, apprehension, or detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses under the criminal laws of the United States.
    (4) “Impersonate” means to act the part of, assume the identity of, wear the uniform or any part of the uniform of, or display the identification of a particular person or of a member of a class of persons with purpose to make another person believe that the actor is that particular person or is a member of that class of persons.
    (5) “Investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation” has the same meaning as in section 2903.11 of the Revised Code.
    (B) No person shall impersonate a peace officer, a private police officer, a federal law enforcement officer, or investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation.
    (C) No person, by impersonating a peace officer, a private police officer, a federal law enforcement officer, or investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation shall arrest or detain any person, search any person, or search the property of any person.
    (D) No person, with purpose to commit or facilitate the commission of an offense, shall impersonate a peace officer, a private police officer, a federal law enforcement officer, an officer, agent, or employee of the state, or investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation.
    (E) No person shall commit a felony while impersonating a peace officer, a private police officer, a federal law enforcement officer, an officer, agent, or employee of the state, or investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation.
    (F) It is an affirmative defense to a charge under division (B) of this section that the impersonation of the peace officer, private police officer, or investigator of the bureau of criminal identification and investigation was for a lawful purpose.
    (G) Whoever violates division (B) of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the fourth degree. Whoever violates division (C) or (D) of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree. If the purpose of a violation of division (D) of this section is to commit or facilitate the commission of a felony, a violation of division (D) is a felony of the fourth degree. Whoever violates division (E) of this section is guilty of a felony of the third degree.
    "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

  • #2
    Originally posted by bigdog View Post
    (2) “Private police officer” means any security guard, special police officer, private detective, or other person who is privately employed in a police capacity.
    Notice the police capacity part, I don't believe they are talking about your everyday security officer.
    Craig

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Craig S View Post
      Notice the police capacity part, I don't believe they are talking about your everyday security officer.
      I have to agree, "employed in a police capacity" is the key statement here.
      Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Craig S View Post
        Notice the police capacity part, I don't believe they are talking about your everyday security officer.
        To be a private police officer you have to complete a training course given by the Ohio peace officers commission.
        "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
          I have to agree, "employed in a police capacity" is the key statement here.
          Yeah, but that could be a huge gray area. It comes down to what Ohio's definiition of "police capacity" means. Some duties of security officers could be considered police capacity.
          "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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          • #6
            Yes according to the Ohio Revised Code Security Officers are considered Private Police Officers. I'm in Ohio and have also taken the Ohio Peace Officers Training Academy Private Security Academy. Nobody in the state pushes the "Private Police" thing because it is just asking for trouble. Everybody here is basically a Security Officer and we know it. Their is a company in Columbus that calls themselves "Task Force Police" and The Whitestone Company has "Private Police" on their patches but they are the only two I know who exploit this issue. I also understand it has gotten them into some s**t before.
            "If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn't thinking."
            - General George Patton Jr

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            • #7
              Why would anyone in security want to be called "Private Police"? We don't have police powers. Anyone who wants to wear a patch that sayes "Private Police" on it, is probably just a wannabe. These are the security officers that scare the hell out of me.

              On the bright side, the training academy sounds like a really good idea. What kind of stuff did they teach? Just the basics or stuff you could really use?
              Craig

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              • #8
                I wonder if this refers to positions like railroad police?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Craig S View Post
                  Why would anyone in security want to be called "Private Police"? We don't have police powers. Anyone who wants to wear a patch that sayes "Private Police" on it, is probably just a wannabe. These are the security officers that scare the hell out of me.

                  On the bright side, the training academy sounds like a really good idea. What kind of stuff did they teach? Just the basics or stuff you could really use?
                  In St. Louis City and County all security officers have the exact same power as a police officer while on duty and in uniform. So yes we do have police powers.

                  There is a rumor going around my place of work that I find very interesting. It involves POST certification.
                  "You gotta look like Rico Suave, Think like Einstein and, only if that fails...fight like Tyson." -Dougo83's FTO

                  Me- "Should we call the police?" My FTO- "Justin, here, we are the police. Go get em."

                  Originally posted by Black Caesar
                  some people just need killin!!!!! (Or Tasing, or pepper spraying or whatever).

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                  • #10
                    On the bright side, the training academy sounds like a really good idea. What kind of stuff did they teach? Just the basics or stuff you could really use?[/QUOTE]

                    It took me 5 months to complete. They taught us Search and Seizure, Laws Of Arrest. Report Writing, ASP and Firearm Certification, Dealing with Persons With Developmental Disability, Cultural Sensitivity, Public Relations, First Aid/CPR, Retail Security, Patrol Techniques, Crowd Control just to name a few courses. It was a 132 hour course. I took it back in 2002 so it could have changed by now.
                    "If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn't thinking."
                    - General George Patton Jr

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                    • #11
                      I worked at an amusement park in ohio and there's a mix of park police and security. Cedar point has park police, and Ive seen young guys up there with police on the patches. Kings Island has the same, with a destinction for security and police. Park Police wear navy tops, khaki pants and badges and patches all say park police. Cars say police, red and blue bar, but has a regular ohio plate which confuses me. The security officers dont carry much, wear white shirts and khaki pants, red light bars and security on the cars. But park police officers usually come from opota classes at scarlett oaks or butler tech, if they are smart.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jer6141 View Post
                        but has a regular ohio plate which confuses me.
                        Most private law enforcement agencies out there roll with regular plates since they are not a government entity and not entitled to exempt plate status.
                        "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                        "The Curve" 1998

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by jer6141 View Post
                          I worked at an amusement park in ohio and there's a mix of park police and security. Cedar point has park police, and Ive seen young guys up there with police on the patches. Kings Island has the same, with a destinction for security and police. Park Police wear navy tops, khaki pants and badges and patches all say park police. Cars say police, red and blue bar, but has a regular ohio plate which confuses me. The security officers dont carry much, wear white shirts and khaki pants, red light bars and security on the cars. But park police officers usually come from opota classes at scarlett oaks or butler tech, if they are smart.
                          Your post was a trip in the wayback machine for me. Early in my career I worked for the Cedar Point Police Department. First in a 'non-bonded' security position and then in a 'bonded' position. The security officers at the amusement park have no powers of arrest and work along side of the bonded officers. The bonded officers are sworn (every year) under the jurisdiction of the city of Sandusky and have full powers of arrest and cite under the codes of the city.

                          Because it is a private police force they have regular license plates on all of the PD vehicles. Their uniforms are close to the city of Sandusky and their patches say, 'Cedar Point Police Department' on them.
                          Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                          Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                          Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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                          • #14
                            Wierd, just plain wierd.

                            I tell you that some of the stuff you guys post about other states and what is allowed just blows my mind. (I'm from California )

                            I will also add that alot of the rules for allowing some of these things (like being the "private police") are probably based on old laws, and sooner or later somebody is going to screw it up for the rest of you, and that stuff will become ancient history.

                            Although I will admit that there are some wierd practices here also, like PATROL SPECIALS (I think that's what their called) in the city and county of San Francisco, which is itself a one and only, as the only city and county in one, in our lovely little state of over 35,000,000 people. You know how there always has to be the one wierd one in the group.

                            To give a little background on the Patrol Specials, they are allowed to PURCHASE little chunks of San Francisco as their area to provide service in, and to sell security services to anyone in that little chunk of town. They wear full SFPD uniforms, and drive FULLY marked and equipped SFPD patrol cars. They have to go through the SFPD police academy, but they do not work for SFPD. To be honest, I don't fully comprehend it myself, but they are even listed in the California penal code as legal.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by bpdblue View Post
                              Although I will admit that there are some wierd practices here also, like PATROL SPECIALS (I think that's what their called) in the city and county of San Francisco, which is itself a one and only, as the only city and county in one, in our lovely little state of over 35,000,000 people. You know how there always has to be the one wierd one in the group.

                              To give a little background on the Patrol Specials, they are allowed to PURCHASE little chunks of San Francisco as their area to provide service in, and to sell security services to anyone in that little chunk of town. They wear full SFPD uniforms, and drive FULLY marked and equipped SFPD patrol cars. They have to go through the SFPD police academy, but they do not work for SFPD. To be honest, I don't fully comprehend it myself, but they are even listed in the California penal code as legal.
                              KUFFS. Loved that movie.
                              Hospital Security Officer

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