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Wreck near my post this weekend

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  • Wreck near my post this weekend

    A car with 4 occupants failed to make a curve on the highway along the fenceline of the Steel mill where I work as an EMT/SO. I had 4 injuries including the driver who was unconscious when I first arrived on scene. While they didn't hit our brand new chainlink fence we had just gotten relpaced following a recent wreck in the same location they managed to knock over a couple of concrete posts on the shoulder of the road which were protecting some utilities. The posts were painted with yellow and black stripes and in the photo you can see paint transfer on the side of the vehicle.
    Photo followed by report, names removed and replaced with *....


    Security Guard/EMT **ME** Date October 14, 2007
    Security Post **** Main Gate Guard Shack Time Approximately 2:00am



    While on duty at the main gate security desk I was advised by Scale Operator L***** that she was hearing radio traffic on the Shipping Channel that someone was hurt. I tuned a portable radio to Channel 4, the shipping channel, and was immediately notified by the ***Contractor** supervisor that a motor vehicle wreck had occurred in the curve on Hwy 628 along the fence line near Shipping. I told my Security Officer partner, ***** ****, to call 911 and report the wreck while I went to check on any injuries. I got in the Bayou Steel Medical van and as I was leaving from between the scales the ***Contract*** supervisor radioed that people were “hurt bad and trapped in the car”. I radioed SO **** to tell her to notify the 911 operator that we now had a wreck with injury and possible entrapment and to ensure that Laplace Fire Department was dispatched.
    As I arrived on the scene of the wreck I saw a car, a Mercury sedan, on the shoulder of the road next to the fence. A male and 2 females were pulling a third female from the drivers seat across the passenger seat and onto the highway. A pickup truck was stopped in the roadway and a young male was trying to help by having the injured passengers sit down and remain calm. The man, who identified himself as a out of area volunteer firefighter on his way to his sisters house, helped me put the injured driver on the long spine board from the medical van, placed a C collar on her and ensured that I had everything under control and help on the way. The bystander then left the scene in his truck.
    I placed the driver on oxygen (12LPM NRB) and then checked the other occupants of the vehicle. One female had lacerations to her face from glass. I gave her a 4X4 dressing to help control the minor bleeding and had her sit in the Medical van along the sliding door. The other female passenger complained of chest pain from hitting her chest on the dash. I had her continue sitting on the ground in front of the van. The male complained of pain in his left shoulder with visible deformity. I had him sit on the front passenger seat of the Medical van. I continued to assist all of the patients until St John Sheriff deputies, 2 Acadian Ambulance units and Laplace Fire Department arrived at approx 2:15am and had loaded the patients into the ambulances.
    State Police Trooper **** arrived and took statements from Shipping Department and **Contractor** employees who witnessed the wreck. The car was loaded onto a wrecker and I drove to the First Aid/Nurses clinic to swap out my empty oxygen bottle.
    At approx 3am I returned to my duties at the main gate security desk.





    Signature _______________________________
    ****ME***,
    Security Officer/EMT
    Hospital Security Officer

  • #2
    As I mentioned, this isn't the first time we've had wrecks into or next to our fence. We've had motorcycle riders slide right under our chainlink after wiping out in the curve. We've had cars hit poles and flip or run into the fence and strike rail cars parked inside our plant on tracks which run along the fenceline such as in this photo-

    I will respond to the wreck, assess the patient/s and assist the ambulance crews when they arrive. I answer the questions asked by the State Trooper for his report then I go back to the guard shack and write up my report for my supervisor when he comes in to relieve me at shift change.
    Yes, if the wreck is not in our fence it's technically outside of the plant. That said, we ( the EMTs and plant medical first responders) often will act as first responder medical to anything happening along the shoulder of the highway along our fence as a public service until local resources arrive (ie fire, police and the private ambulance service). I've been out there on the roadside doing chest compressions while a Medical First Responder trained shipping department employee does bag ventilations on an unresponsive accident victim.
    Any equiptment we used such as Collars or masks are restocked from the ambulance when it arrives. If I have to put a patient on our backboard, we will have someone, often the Security Officer, drive to the local hospital to retrieve the board.
    This weekend, after the wreck, I called my supervisor as he was leaving home and told him to pick up the backboard from the hospital on his way to the plant. I then deconned it and placed it back in the medical van.
    The only thing that we don't restock is the oxygen we use. So far the plant has not had a problem with getting the O2 bottles refilled after we use them assisting a citizen. It's a minimal expense and the bottle is sent off with others used in the medical department for employees who have breathing difficulties or other similar complaints.
    I hope this offered a peek into a night in my world.
    Hospital Security Officer

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow. Good Job. These folks probably don't realise how fortunate they are to have people there to observe these accidents and you right there on the scene. Again, Good Job.

      Comment


      • #4
        Great job EMT/Guard and nice description of your triage. I am in a very similar role with similar gear as yours where I work. We have been known to lend a hand to Joe public in similar events as well, hey if we can help someone out lets do it! Say were in the community patrolling our companies interests (which we have a few) and we come across someone in distress, could be an MVC like yours, or someone collapsed on the sidewalk. It's times like these when someone needs help R.F.N. Although off property were still trained to do it, so git'er done!

        I think it's important that clients allow this, infect I would hope so, yet I have seen a time (as a hospital S/O) when I got a little heat for leaving the site while looking for a missing patient, my gut told me to go to the lake and look around, so did the missing patient's. Fortunately the confused man was OK and just walking lost in knee deep water. The next day I was reminded by my supervisor not to leave the site (incident reports are so incriminating sometimes), later in a pre-scheduled meeting with hospital management the situation was brought up and the manager's comments had a more 'good stuff' ring to them. Either way it still felt good knowing I helped the old guy.

        My point is that clients/supervision need remember that when we do things like assist/respond off property and someone is better off because of it, that kinda stuff looks good on the company. Oh and someone lives another day, or is simply comforted knowing a professional is "here to help".
        I'm the guy you don't want to be around when your doing something wrong, but you can't wait for me to get there when your down, to fix you up...

        If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.

        Comment


        • #5
          You are to be commended for your quick thinking and professionalism in rendering assistance to these folks.
          I know you probably do not want publicity, but it would be a feather in your professional security officer hat to have public recognition. Hopefully the reporting media will mention your position as a security officer and perhaps kind words from sheriff and/or state police departments will do the trick. I'd like to see a letter of favorable communication in your personal folder by ranking city or county fathers sent through channels to your company's CEO and down through your corporate structure.
          Enjoy the day,
          Bill

          Comment


          • #6
            Bill,
            In the nearly 3 years I've ben there we've had many wrecks and injuries. Many have been reported in the local newspaper. NEVER has any article made any mention of patients being treated by EMTs from the Security Guard service or Medical First Responders from the plant.
            We've had a woman hit our fence and run into a train car. Her left arm was amputated at the shoulder. It was my supervisor who was the EMT on duty that day and he and a First Responder from the shipping department kept the woman alive until the ambulance srvice and fire department arrived and put her on a helicopter. When the article appeared in the paper nothing was mentioned of our people. It only mentioned that the woman was treated by Acadina Ambulance and LaPlace firefighters and flown to suchandsuch hospital.
            I did CPR with a First Responder for 10 minutes on a motorcycle rider who missed the curve and hit a pole before sliding into our fence. Acadian Ambulance arived, put him in the ambulance and worked on hime for about 15 minutes before driving, nonemergent, to the hospital. The Biker was prononced DOA. The article in the paper again read- treated by Acadian Ambulance....
            I can go on and on.
            It's even difficult getting through to the police officer on scene doing his report that I'm in fact a National Registered Emergency Medical Technician (pointing to the round NREMT patch on my shirt sleeve) holding the same certifications as the person driving the Acadian Ambulance unit away to the hospital. I also have to explain that the large sweaty guy next to me that was doing chest compressions is a trained and State certified Medical First Responder and not just some Donny Dogood.
            Sure they are probably used to meeting minimum wage security guards being on scene and getting in the way. Some may have CPR or Red Cross First Aid training. What he's not used to is showing up to a place which has trained EMT's on standby with vans equipted with medical gear.
            Even though I'm standing there with a stethascope around my neck, nitrile gloves on my hands and wearing a cap that looks like this

            the cop will probably note in his report "Security Guard was on scene when officers arrived". Except for the Plant Safety Officer who will read my copy of the Special Incident Report the next day, no one else will know anyone except the local Firefighters and Ambulance service was there.
            Last edited by EMTGuard; 10-15-2007, 10:51 PM.
            Hospital Security Officer

            Comment


            • #7
              EMT Guard, someone always remembers the important stuff, for the patient might be "the guy that saved my life/the guy that helped me out", sometimes it takes time for local law enforcement and Emergency Medical Services as well as te community to realiize what we really do. I truely know what you are saying, being in a dual role myself.

              You truely are a man of many hats!

              Sorry I had to.
              I'm the guy you don't want to be around when your doing something wrong, but you can't wait for me to get there when your down, to fix you up...

              If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
                Ive seen these hats in EMT, POLICE, SECURITY, from time to time... the little bit of text on the front always makes me chuckle... as if someone cant see the big ass EMT on the front, but they'll read it off the front of the bill.
                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                "The Curve" 1998

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by BHR Lawson View Post
                  Ive seen these hats in EMT, POLICE, SECURITY, from time to time... the little bit of text on the front always makes me chuckle... as if someone cant see the big ass EMT on the front, but they'll read it off the front of the bill.
                  The might be nearsighted.
                  The CCTV Blog.

                  "Expert" is something like "leader". It's not a title that you can ever claim for yourself no matter what you might know or might have done. It's a title that others bestow on you based on their assessment of what you know and what you have done.

                  -SecTrainer

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sure step up to the plate and help 100 people and no one knows your name. But just shoot one punk through the head and all of a sudden everyone knows you. Just don't seem right.
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
                    THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
                    http://www.boondocksaints.com/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great job!

                      We have several Security Officers who are Firefighters and/or EMT's. I usually let them do their thing until the city FD/EMS arrives.
                      "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Chucky View Post
                        Sure step up to the plate and help 100 people and no one knows your name. But just shoot one punk through the head and all of a sudden everyone knows you. Just don't seem right.
                        LMAO. Can't win em all.
                        I'm the guy you don't want to be around when your doing something wrong, but you can't wait for me to get there when your down, to fix you up...

                        If you don't stand behind our troops, feel free to stand in front of them.

                        Comment

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